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Is this computer configured where it will work? :P

KilawuaKilawua Tulsa, OKPosts: 52Member

http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/system/Gamer_Scorpius_8000/

I plan to change the case to the Cooler Master HAF-X though. Will it work alright? :/

Comments

  • jdnewelljdnewell Spring Hill, TNPosts: 2,150Member Uncommon

    It should work fine.

    But I have to ask, If your going to buy another case, take everything out of the old one and put it in a new case, then why oh why dont you just buy the components and build one?!?

    No offense but that whole idea is just plain silly. And thats wording it nicely o.O

  • AvsRock21AvsRock21 Denver, COPosts: 256Member

    I agree with the above poster. Build your own computer! As long as you have access to Google and Youtube, you won't have many problems. Also, you can always ask questions here if you run into issues. If you read the manuals for your motherboard, case, processor, power supply, and video card, you probably won't even need to look anything up on Google or Youtube. The manuals have most of the instructions on how to hook everything together. The build will also be cheaper, and you can customize it more building it yourself. Just make sure the parts are compatible when you buy them! (CPU socket must match motherboard socket etc...)

     

    And the Coolermaster HAF-X Full Tower case is absolutely amazing. It's a beast and has plenty of room for everything. The cooling it in is more than sufficient as well.

  • KilawuaKilawua Tulsa, OKPosts: 52Member
    I meant I was going to order that case instead of the one the configurator thing set as default. They won't assemble the parts in the new case? I don't know how this works. :P
  • tkacidtkacid Calgary, ABPosts: 17Member
    nice
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,789Member Uncommon

    You don't buy a $200 case on a tight budget.  Or at least you shouldn't.  The HAF-X is a case that you might think about on a $1500-$2000 budget, not your stated $500-$700 budget.

  • KilawuaKilawua Tulsa, OKPosts: 52Member
    Okay, I guess I won't.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,789Member Uncommon

    It looks like you're inclined to give up on waiting for prebuilt Trinity.  That's understandable, and I'm surprised that OEMs mostly aren't offering the Trinity platform yet.  HP does, but only in a badly-configured all-in-one (not that there is any other kind of all-in-one), and not in a real desktop.  Even CyberPower PC and AVA Direct, which have long offered Llano systems, aren't offering Trinity.

    So I'd say, go ahead and get the computer that you linked.  You might want 1866 MHz memory rather than 1600 MHz, since they're the same price.  But just recognize that about $100 of that price tag is paying someone else to read directions and use a screwdriver.

  • jdnewelljdnewell Spring Hill, TNPosts: 2,150Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Kilawua
    I meant I was going to order that case instead of the one the configurator thing set as default. They won't assemble the parts in the new case? I don't know how this works. :P

    Doh my bad lol.

    I was home sick and on medication o.O I misunderstood what you meant lol.

    But building your own is still a good idea =) You can order one from a place like that and it should work fine to answer your question. All the parts wont be top notch or real dependable tho. However when you unpack the box and plug it into the wall it will boot up.

  • eddieg50eddieg50 Tolland, CTPosts: 1,614Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    It looks like you're inclined to give up on waiting for prebuilt Trinity.  That's understandable, and I'm surprised that OEMs mostly aren't offering the Trinity platform yet.  HP does, but only in a badly-configured all-in-one (not that there is any other kind of all-in-one), and not in a real desktop.  Even CyberPower PC and AVA Direct, which have long offered Llano systems, aren't offering Trinity.

    So I'd say, go ahead and get the computer that you linked.  You might want 1866 MHz memory rather than 1600 MHz, since they're the same price.  But just recognize that about $100 of that price tag is paying someone else to read directions and use a screwdriver.

       I bought a pre built computer from Ava direct for not much more than I could have bought all the parts from some place like Tiger direct or new egg.  They have a really good forum where they will answere your questions, or you can call them  (I did) and talked directly to a tech or sales person, if they cannot answere your question they will find someone who will.  I felt no sales pressure from them nor did they try to upsell me. Just asked me questions of what I was looking for in a computer. They build it, test it, tweak it and ship it with a 3 yr warrentee.  To me it looks kind of complicated to build a computer, I guess if I put my mind to it I could but what if I screw up?  I think it is also a huge time saver.  Any way this is not a commercial for Ava Direct LOL just that I had good luck with them and they treat you well

  • jdnewelljdnewell Spring Hill, TNPosts: 2,150Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by eddieg50
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    It looks like you're inclined to give up on waiting for prebuilt Trinity.  That's understandable, and I'm surprised that OEMs mostly aren't offering the Trinity platform yet.  HP does, but only in a badly-configured all-in-one (not that there is any other kind of all-in-one), and not in a real desktop.  Even CyberPower PC and AVA Direct, which have long offered Llano systems, aren't offering Trinity.

    So I'd say, go ahead and get the computer that you linked.  You might want 1866 MHz memory rather than 1600 MHz, since they're the same price.  But just recognize that about $100 of that price tag is paying someone else to read directions and use a screwdriver.

       I bought a pre built computer from Ava direct for not much more than I could have bought all the parts from some place like Tiger direct or new egg.  They have a really good forum where they will answere your questions, or you can call them  (I did) and talked directly to a tech or sales person, if they cannot answere your question they will find someone who will.  I felt no sales pressure from them nor did they try to upsell me. Just asked me questions of what I was looking for in a computer. They build it, test it, tweak it and ship it with a 3 yr warrentee.  To me it looks kind of complicated to build a computer, I guess if I put my mind to it I could but what if I screw up?  I think it is also a huge time saver.  Any way this is not a commercial for Ava Direct LOL just that I had good luck with them and they treat you well

    If I were to order a prebuilt PC then it would be from AVAdirect as well. I enjoy building my own and take some satisfaction that " I " built it from the ground up. I can see the appeal for ordering one already built for many people tho.

    Just make sure you pick quality parts for them to assemble. As they have no qualms about selling you a misconfigured         " gaming " computer that pretty much sucks.

  • ghettocelebghettoceleb brush prairie, WAPosts: 76Member Uncommon
    I doesn't take much time to assemble the components. My first build was quick and almost no problems. 
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,789Member Uncommon

    I think that AVA Direct's business model is to wait until you place an order, and then they'll buy parts off of New Egg or Tiger Direct or Amazon or whatever.  Then they'll mark it up 10% or 20% or some such before passing it on to you.  That means that, unlike most OEMs, they don't really care which particular parts you get, but only the total price tag.  They get the same profit whether you severely overpay for inferior hardware or get a great deal for the money (again, with the same total price tag), so they don't have to try to steer you toward the former.

    Most other OEMs have a handful of parts that they stock, and have to buy the parts ahead of time.  That lets them test configurations more throughly (which matters less today than it used to) and lets them have a quicker turnaround time.  But it also sometimes means that they have particular parts that they really want to get rid of.  (If a part on Dell's site says "Dell Recommended", that means, "This is the choice that gives us the largest profit margin.")  And, of course, it means a much narrower selection.

  • eddieg50eddieg50 Tolland, CTPosts: 1,614Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    I think that AVA Direct's business model is to wait until you place an order, and then they'll buy parts off of New Egg or Tiger Direct or Amazon or whatever.  Then they'll mark it up 10% or 20% or some such before passing it on to you.  That means that, unlike most OEMs, they don't really care which particular parts you get, but only the total price tag.  They get the same profit whether you severely overpay for inferior hardware or get a great deal for the money (again, with the same total price tag), so they don't have to try to steer you toward the former.

    Most other OEMs have a handful of parts that they stock, and have to buy the parts ahead of time.  That lets them test configurations more throughly (which matters less today than it used to) and lets them have a quicker turnaround time.  But it also sometimes means that they have particular parts that they really want to get rid of.  (If a part on Dell's site says "Dell Recommended", that means, "This is the choice that gives us the largest profit margin.")  And, of course, it means a much narrower selection.

       Befor I ordered I knew exactly which parts I was getting , I than looked them up on New egg to price check them and when the computer came it had a packing list with the products and their names, I then took off the side wall and double checked the parts (I had to do that anyway as they blow foam into the interior to protect it during shipping) and everything seemed kosher, so i guess I'm happy

  • Recon48Recon48 QC, IAPosts: 221Member
    There are plenty of 'How-To' write-ups on various websites to walk anyone familiar with tools through the build process.  
  • eddieg50eddieg50 Tolland, CTPosts: 1,614Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Recon48
    There are plenty of 'How-To' write-ups on various websites to walk anyone familiar with tools through the build process.  

      I am sure there are , I found it easier to let an expert build it, tweak it and give ma a warrentee to boot

  • jdnewelljdnewell Spring Hill, TNPosts: 2,150Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by eddieg50
    Originally posted by Recon48
    There are plenty of 'How-To' write-ups on various websites to walk anyone familiar with tools through the build process.  

      I am sure there are , I found it easier to let an expert build it, tweak it and give ma a warrentee to boot

    Umm yeah.

    You should look at their forums at the feedback / complaint section.

    That should tell you all you need to know about the " experts " and the ' warrentee'. You do know that if you have problems you have to ship it back- at your expense no less-, wait 4-6 weeks for it to be returned and hope they fixed the problem. The horror stories abou people haveing to pay 2 or 3 times to ship it back to resolve an issue ( at their expense ) should be enough to scare anyone off.

    I know a friend of mine ordered one from Ibuypower ( which is now the same company as cyberpower), had one of the graphics cards go bad. They told him to ship it back at his expense, they would put a hold of $600 bucks on his credit card, and if they found a problem with the graphics card they would replace it and refund the hold on his CC. And all this would take 4-6 weeks to accomplish.

    A guild mate of mine years ago in WoW ordered one from cyberpower. It wouldnt boot up when he unpacked it. After trouble shooting and still not gettting it to work he had to ship it back and pay shipping to do so. I think he got his back after a month and about $100 bucks in shipping costs.

    Those are just 2 i know of personally. Read their forums and judge for yourself. Hopefully you wont have any problems. If you do, expect to find out just how much that " warantee" is worth.

    Good luck

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,179Member Uncommon

    I can certainly understand why someone may not want to build their own computer. I see a lot of folks day in and day out that just aren't comfortable with the idea (although I'm certain they are technically capable of doing it).

    I've seen more than my fair share of horror stories from iBuyPower/Cyberpower myself, and typically don't recommend them. I usually recommend that someone go to a local Mom&Pop shop that they can trust - usually these places will either build to your specifications and charge a slight markup, or take the parts that you order and put them together for a small fee (usually around $75-150 in my experience). The reason for this:

    * If it breaks, you have someone local you can call, and don't have to pay shipping to take it in to.

    * Warranty is covered on a per-part basis, Mom&Pop usually aren't going to tack on anything additional here, so if something breaks - they can assist (and they may charge), but it isn't on them (unless they tried to hammer it in or something else obviously neglegent).

    * Mom&Pop usually try to do good work. Being local, the best advertising for them is word of mouth, and if you are one more happy customer and tell your friends, it's good for their business.

    Some people just don't have a local shop they can trust though (and not all Mom&Pop shops are noble enterprising small business owners - some are just out to get your money and provide no better service than any big box store). In that event, I usually recommend that the person spend a bit more money to go through someone more reputable: Falcon Northwest and Puget Systems are two that I know of that have a good reputation, they aren't the only ones out there though. You will pay more, but you will get a decent system. These companies are typically very concerned with their reputation.

    If it's a super-budget build, then I recommend going to your local university or tech hangout (like Frys) with case of beer in hand, and finding the hobbiests. There are a lot of people who just love to put stuff together and there is nothing better than using other people's money to build a computer - and will often do it for no other reason than they like to do it.

  • tadams2tonetadams2tone Eureka, CAPosts: 39Member
    Do not buy from Ibuypower/Cyberpower PC.  I have had horrible experiences, so have many others.  Do a google search for complaints about them.  I will not bore you with the details of my entire experience but they sold me two non-working comps, use stalling tactics so that you can't stop payment through your credit card/bank, and will flat out scam you.  If you don't believe me look them up through FCC they have at least one or two violations/fines.  You can say  but "reseller ratings" look at all their positive reviews on reseller ratings.  Most of them seem like complete B.S. and nothing a gamer would say.  Just do yourself a favor, go somewhere else or do it yourself. 
  • eddieg50eddieg50 Tolland, CTPosts: 1,614Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by jdnewell
    Originally posted by eddieg50
    Originally posted by Recon48
    There are plenty of 'How-To' write-ups on various websites to walk anyone familiar with tools through the build process.  

      I am sure there are , I found it easier to let an expert build it, tweak it and give ma a warrentee to boot

    Umm yeah.

    You should look at their forums at the feedback / complaint section.

    That should tell you all you need to know about the " experts " and the ' warrentee'. You do know that if you have problems you have to ship it back- at your expense no less-, wait 4-6 weeks for it to be returned and hope they fixed the problem. The horror stories abou people haveing to pay 2 or 3 times to ship it back to resolve an issue ( at their expense ) should be enough to scare anyone off.

    I know a friend of mine ordered one from Ibuypower ( which is now the same company as cyberpower), had one of the graphics cards go bad. They told him to ship it back at his expense, they would put a hold of $600 bucks on his credit card, and if they found a problem with the graphics card they would replace it and refund the hold on his CC. And all this would take 4-6 weeks to accomplish.

    A guild mate of mine years ago in WoW ordered one from cyberpower. It wouldnt boot up when he unpacked it. After trouble shooting and still not gettting it to work he had to ship it back and pay shipping to do so. I think he got his back after a month and about $100 bucks in shipping costs.

    Those are just 2 i know of personally. Read their forums and judge for yourself. Hopefully you wont have any problems. If you do, expect to find out just how much that " warantee" is worth.

    Good luck

       I dont know what you are looking at , Almost Every review I read of Ava direct was a good one. If you look at resellers, they have reviews of all the computer builders and Ava finished way up there, while companies like Ibuypower and cyberpower were highly criticized. No where in my posts did I say I was thinking or buying from those terrible companies, that is why it is so important to do research before you buy, and JD you should actually read my posts before you make such a uninformed comment, there is nothing I cant stand more than someone who just blurts something out without reading a post.  By the way the Graphics card and some of the other parts had seperate warrantees and you can rest assured I sent those in also

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,789Member Uncommon

    If you haven't placed the order yet, then you're in luck.  AVA Direct now has Trinity for sale.

    http://www.avadirect.com/desktop-pc-configurator.asp?PRID=25793

    Unfortunately, they only offer one motherboard at the moment, and as Socket FM2 goes, it's basically the top of the line--and about $60 more than you should be looking to pay for a motherboard.

    If that's the route you want to go, then the things to change from the default are:

    Case:  Cooler Master Elite 311 (cheap, and adequate for a low power system)

    Power supply:  Seasonic SS-500ET (it would be nice if they offered a cheaper power supply of comparable quality but lower wattage, but they don't)

    Processor:  A10-5800K

    Memory:  Corsair 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) Vengeance PC-15000 DDR3 1866 MHz  (the 1866 MHz matters if you're using integrated graphics)

    OS:  Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

    As I configured it, it comes to $678.95.

    If 120 GB is enough for you, then you can also swap out the hard drive for a Mushkin 120 GB Chronos SSD.  If you later decide that you need more storage space, then it's easy to add a hard drive later.

    It would be ideal if you could save some money on the motherboard by getting something cheaper.  An A75 chipset model would probably be the best.  They'll presumably offer more motherboards at some point, and it wouldn't hurt to ask them about it.

    For what it's worth, as compared to what you're looking at from Cyber Power PC, this would have a little faster processor, but maybe half of the graphics performance.  You could add a video card in the future if you decide you need better graphics performance.  It also doesn't give you the Cyber Power PC offer of a 60 GB SSD together with the hard drive.

    But there aren't the horror stories about AVA Direct that there are for Cyber Power PC.  If you buy a computer form the latter, it will probably be fine, but they're cheaper for a reason.

  • eddieg50eddieg50 Tolland, CTPosts: 1,614Member Uncommon
     edit
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,789Member Uncommon
    I meant, if Kilawua hadn't placed the order yet.
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