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For how much would you sell an asus gtx 285 1g graphic card?

treyu86treyu86 SevillaPosts: 230Member Uncommon
I have just upgraded my old asus gtx 285 1gb and I am thinking about selling it. Which price would you think is a fair one? thanks

Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,772Member Uncommon
    It has performance in the same ballpark as a Radeon HD 7770, which is a ~$120 card new.  Since your card is used with a lot of wear and tear on it, uses a lot more power, doesn't support more recent APIs, and probably won't get driver support for nearly as long, you'll presumably have to charge quite a bit less than that.  Unless you can find some sucker who is willing to massively overpay because he doesn't realize that it isn't 2009 anymore.
  • GruntyGrunty Fort Worth, TXPosts: 7,042Member Uncommon
  • wesjrwesjr Gilbert, AZPosts: 366Member Uncommon

    $75 or so.

     

    I just picked up a GTX 280 for $35  heh

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,172Member Uncommon

    Ebay has PC version averaging around $75-100US.

  • GruntyGrunty Fort Worth, TXPosts: 7,042Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    Ebay has PC version averaging around $75-100US.

    And people have only bid on the $25 and $50 auctions.

  • ReizlaReizla AlkmaarPosts: 3,299Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by treyu86
    I have just upgraded my old asus gtx 285 1gb and I am thinking about selling it. Which price would you think is a fair one? thanks

    Originally posted by Quizzical
    It has performance in the same ballpark as a Radeon HD 7770, which is a ~$120 card new.  Since your card is used with a lot of wear and tear on it, uses a lot more power, doesn't support more recent APIs, and probably won't get driver support for nearly as long, you'll presumably have to charge quite a bit less than that.  Unless you can find some sucker who is willing to massively overpay because he doesn't realize that it isn't 2009 anymore.

    I agree that it's an older card, but you might get a nice price for it anyway. Not for ppl who want it as 'new' card, but for those searching for one to drop in SLI in a slightly older PC. When I look at the GTX460 (1st release versions), those are sold 2nd hand for around €100, while you can get a GTX460 v2 for a bit more than that, and that all for those who would like one in SLI. So perhaps the same thing might go for the GTX285...

    AsRock 990FX Extreme3
    AMD Phenom II 1090T ~3.2Ghz
    GEiL 16Gb DDR3 1600Mhz
    ASUS GTX970 3x HD monitor 1920x1080

  • ZebladeZeblade Colorado Springs, COPosts: 926Member
    Just look on Ebay.. you can get one for $40,65,75,100.. anything after $65 and your just ripping people off.
  • Loke666Loke666 MalmöPosts: 17,949Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    Ebay has PC version averaging around $75-100US.

    That sounds reasonable to me.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,772Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Reizla

    Originally posted by treyu86
    I have just upgraded my old asus gtx 285 1gb and I am thinking about selling it. Which price would you think is a fair one? thanks

    Originally posted by Quizzical
    It has performance in the same ballpark as a Radeon HD 7770, which is a ~$120 card new.  Since your card is used with a lot of wear and tear on it, uses a lot more power, doesn't support more recent APIs, and probably won't get driver support for nearly as long, you'll presumably have to charge quite a bit less than that.  Unless you can find some sucker who is willing to massively overpay because he doesn't realize that it isn't 2009 anymore.

    I agree that it's an older card, but you might get a nice price for it anyway. Not for ppl who want it as 'new' card, but for those searching for one to drop in SLI in a slightly older PC. When I look at the GTX460 (1st release versions), those are sold 2nd hand for around €100, while you can get a GTX460 v2 for a bit more than that, and that all for those who would like one in SLI. So perhaps the same thing might go for the GTX285...

    Which is a subset of what I said:  suckers who will overpay because they don't realize it isn't 2009 anymore.

    SLI is especially dependent on drivers, and architectures that were discontinued three years ago and don't support modern APIs aren't a major focus of the driver team.  In contrast, a GTX 460 is Fermi, which comprised most of Nvidia's current lineup until last week.  A GTX 460 also supports the modern APIs, while a GTX 285 doesn't.

    Even getting a second GTX 460 for SLI today doesn't make much sense unless you can get one dirt cheap--and $100 isn't dirt cheap, when it's almost as much as a comparable card would cost new.

    And if someone paid extra for an overbuilt motherboard and power supply with the intention of going SLI someday, and now thinks they need to because they've already paid much of the cost, that's the sunk cost fallacy.  Making the mistake of overpaying for the other components in the first place doesn't obligate you to make the additional mistake of adding a second old card for SLI.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,172Member Uncommon

    In Rezlia's defense:

    The 460 was really the first card to come out where, in terms of performance/price, it in SLI beat out the single-card competition.


    It really helped that the 480/470/465's were broken Fermi, and the 460 was later introduced and hugely improved in terms of power/price/performance.

    Prior to that, you could never really find an example where it was cheaper (in terms of card costs alone) to SLI two lesser cards to get the same performance as a faster card.

    So with the 460, we saw a whole slew of people who starting coming out recommending SLI - it was faster and cheaper than a single card. At least, until you consider the big picture: whole case, motherboard, power, driver support, etc.

    So the 460 SLI case is a bit unique, and 460 GTX 1G's did resell for a long time very well, mainly on this blitz of press they got for their SLI performance.

    Another mitigating circumstance there was the nVidia naming convention. There were what, 4 different GPU's all using the 460 name? A lot of people trying to SLI would buy a new one later, find out it wasn't the same, and didn't work in SLI. Again, driving up the market for the used older cards.

    So yes, there are times when used cards can retain a lot of value - sometimes as much or more than original MSRP. The Original 460 GTX 1G was one of those cases. The 285 GTX - not so much though. And this is the point I think Rezlia is trying to make: sometimes a card can hold a high value (and using the 460 GTX 1G for SLI as an example). Another example would be the Macintosh version of the 285 (going on Ebay for $200+ because the firmware doesn't require special hacks/patches to work with OS X and supports Quaddro acceleration for graphics apps). Not really a case for/against SLI.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,772Member Uncommon
    There's a difference between buying a second GTX 460 for SLI two years ago and buying one today.  And there's also a difference between picking up one today at $30 to add it for SLI, and paying $100 for it.  If you have one GTX 460 today and they go for $100 and you've got $100 to spend to increase your graphical performance, then the sensible thing to do is to sell your card for $100 and buy a ~$200 card--or better yet, stretch the budget a bit to fit a Radeon HD 7870, or for an Nvidia fan, a GeForce GTX 660.
  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,172Member Uncommon


    Originally posted by Quizzical
    There's a difference between buying a second GTX 460 for SLI two years ago and buying one today.  And there's also a difference between picking up one today at $30 to add it for SLI, and paying $100 for it.  If you have one GTX 460 today and they go for $100 and you've got $100 to spend to increase your graphical performance, then the sensible thing to do is to sell your card for $100 and buy a ~$200 card--or better yet, stretch the budget a bit to fit a Radeon HD 7870, or for an Nvidia fan, a GeForce GTX 660.

    No one was talking about buying, or selling, a 460 today. The 460 was just an example of a card that happened to sell well second hand, in the hopes that perhaps a 285 may as well.

    This is about selling a 285. Not SLI. Not purchasing anything at all.

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