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Who IS WoW's target audience?

YakkinYakkin irvine, CAPosts: 919Member

WoW pretty much has every player under the sun playing right now. My question is who exactly did WoW target back during it's release, and does it still target that same group now? If it is targetting a different or broader range of groups, is it viable in the long term to maintain it's current success?

Please try to minimize the "VANILLA WOW WAS FOR HARDCORE PEOPLE AND THE CASUALS RUINED EVERYTHING!" and the "CASUALS ARE THE PLAYERS THAT PAY MORE MONEY IN THE LONG RUN AND THE HARDCORES ARE JUST SPECIAL SNOWFLAKE ELITIST D-BAGS" bullcrap. I already get enough headaches reading the WoW forums, I don't need another one.

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Comments

  • StanlyStankoStanlyStanko Stanksville, OHPosts: 269Member Common
    13 year old girls that love pandas
  • trash656trash656 Here, SKPosts: 357Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Enigmatus"VANILLA WOW WAS FOR HARDCORE PEOPLE AND THE CASUALS RUINED EVERYTHING!"

    ^

    You basically answered your own question there I think.

    My personal research though had indicated that it wasn't the casuals, but that the original development team was no longer working on WoW near the end of the burning crusade. Most (Not All) but a lot of the developers near the end of BC had all been replaced, because they had just started working on their next upcomming MMO called Titan, and the developers who had worked on WoW were now working on Titan. New Developers - New Idea's - WoW Changed

    This is just from Research done over the internet though, so I'm not sure if all that information is correct as not everything you read is correct. The only way to really know is if you worked for Blizzard Entertainment around that time. Everything else is just Theory or peoples opinion.

    GhostCrawler changed WoW a lot. Most of the hard core gamers hate him, but I don't care because I left WoW when Wrath of the Noobking came out. Good Riddance

  • FrodoFraginsFrodoFragins Manchester, NHPosts: 2,926Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Enigmatus

    WoW pretty much has every player under the sun playing right now. My question is who exactly did WoW target back during it's release, and does it still target that same group now? If it is targetting a different or broader range of groups, is it viable in the long term to maintain it's current success?

    Please try to minimize the "VANILLA WOW WAS FOR HARDCORE PEOPLE AND THE CASUALS RUINED EVERYTHING!" and the "CASUALS ARE THE PLAYERS THAT PAY MORE MONEY IN THE LONG RUN AND THE HARDCORES ARE JUST SPECIAL SNOWFLAKE ELITIST D-BAGS" bullcrap. I already get enough headaches reading the WoW forums, I don't need another one.

    They targetted Warcraft fans, Blizzard fans, MMO fans and RPG fans.  They basically looked at EQ and probably a few other games and improved them a whole lot.  They never could have dreamed it would become as huge as it became.

     

    Even in Vanilla, the hardcores were only like 10% of the population.  They quickly learned to cater to a much bigger portion of their playerbase.

  • YakkinYakkin irvine, CAPosts: 919Member

    Elaboration:

    I've seen statements from various possibly dubious sources stating that WoW was more or less a casualized/easier/less tedious/more colorful version of older MMOs such as Everquest and such, or at the least possessed systems from the MMOs of that time period.

    Thing is, more recently I've seen equally numerous and dubious sources stating that WoW was some kind of hardcore uber difficult and awesome virtual world that was, and I paraphrase, "dumbed down in the name of making money and pandering to brainless teenagers/kids/basement dwellers/whoever the flying fuck they attach a label to."

    Now frankly, this is highly exaggerated, but these two messages I commonly see on forums (yes I know they are a minority in general, but it's not like the SILENT majority are going to tell me much of anything) are so strange and conflicting that I can't help but feel I'm missing something here; a leap in logic or a gap in the timeline if you will.

  • prpshrtprpshrt Clarksville, MDPosts: 258Member

    Not to be racist but their target audience is now the chinese. Remember reading somewhere that a majority of their subs come from china so why not cater to them more. Sure it pisses vets off but that's what investors care about at the end of the day. Heck if I were an investor I'd want the same. 

  • FrodoFraginsFrodoFragins Manchester, NHPosts: 2,926Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Enigmatus

    Elaboration:

    I've seen statements from various possibly dubious sources stating that WoW was more or less a casualized/easier/less tedious/more colorful version of older MMOs such as Everquest and such, or at the least possessed systems from the MMOs of that time period.

    Thing is, more recently I've seen equally numerous and dubious sources stating that WoW was some kind of hardcore uber difficult and awesome virtual world that was, and I paraphrase, "dumbed down in the name of making money and pandering to brainless teenagers/kids/basement dwellers/whoever the flying fuck they attach a label to."

    Now frankly, this is highly exaggerated, but these two messages I commonly see on forums (yes I know they are a minority in general, but it's not like the SILENT majority are going to tell me much of anything) are so strange and conflicting that I can't help but feel I'm missing something here; a leap in logic or a gap in the timeline if you will.

    They absolutely used EQ as an inspiration and hired many EQ devs.  They also fixed a lot of the problems with EQ but still included world bosses for guilds to fight over their spawns.  Blizzard has always been focused on making games fun.  EQ wasn't really fun for most people.

     

    WOW vanilla raids, starting with BWL was really hard.  It was hard enough finding 40 competent people but the content itself was much harder than 25 man content that came later.

  • trash656trash656 Here, SKPosts: 357Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by FrodoFragins
    Originally posted by Enigmatus

    Elaboration:

    I've seen statements from various possibly dubious sources stating that WoW was more or less a casualized/easier/less tedious/more colorful version of older MMOs such as Everquest and such, or at the least possessed systems from the MMOs of that time period.

    Thing is, more recently I've seen equally numerous and dubious sources stating that WoW was some kind of hardcore uber difficult and awesome virtual world that was, and I paraphrase, "dumbed down in the name of making money and pandering to brainless teenagers/kids/basement dwellers/whoever the flying fuck they attach a label to."

    Now frankly, this is highly exaggerated, but these two messages I commonly see on forums (yes I know they are a minority in general, but it's not like the SILENT majority are going to tell me much of anything) are so strange and conflicting that I can't help but feel I'm missing something here; a leap in logic or a gap in the timeline if you will.

    They absolutely used EQ as an inspiration and hired many EQ devs.  They also fixed a lot of the problems with EQ but still included world bosses for guilds to fight over their spawns.  Blizzard has always been focused on making games fun.  EQ wasn't really fun for most people.

     

    WOW vanilla raids, starting with BWL was really hard.  It was hard enough finding 40 competent people but the content itself was much harder than 25 man content that came later.

    ^^^

    +10

  • FrodoFraginsFrodoFragins Manchester, NHPosts: 2,926Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by prpshrt

    Not to be racist but their target audience is now the chinese. Remember reading somewhere that a majority of their subs come from china so why not cater to them more. Sure it pisses vets off but that's what investors care about at the end of the day. Heck if I were an investor I'd want the same. 

    Now that's a dubious claim!

     

    The asian players pay by the amount played, not a subscription.  They have more than 50% of the players but not 50% of the revenue.  A lot of their players have been clamoring for Pandarens since the game released.

  • trash656trash656 Here, SKPosts: 357Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by FrodoFragins
    Originally posted by Enigmatus

    Elaboration:

    I've seen statements from various possibly dubious sources stating that WoW was more or less a casualized/easier/less tedious/more colorful version of older MMOs such as Everquest and such, or at the least possessed systems from the MMOs of that time period.

    Thing is, more recently I've seen equally numerous and dubious sources stating that WoW was some kind of hardcore uber difficult and awesome virtual world that was, and I paraphrase, "dumbed down in the name of making money and pandering to brainless teenagers/kids/basement dwellers/whoever the flying fuck they attach a label to."

    Now frankly, this is highly exaggerated, but these two messages I commonly see on forums (yes I know they are a minority in general, but it's not like the SILENT majority are going to tell me much of anything) are so strange and conflicting that I can't help but feel I'm missing something here; a leap in logic or a gap in the timeline if you will.

    Blizzard has always been focused on making games fun. 

    Unfortunitly in doing this, they also started sniffing paint, started doing crack, and then they found this green... oozee.. stuff and in the end mutated them into albino monkeys with autism, and they went a little overboard pushing the big red easy mode button in the service room over and over again spasticly jumping up and down, and then slowly over time it became so easy that we had our 6 year old son plowing through raids like no tommorow... the service manager 4 years later opened the door and saw 6 dead albino monkeys, and thats when the idea of Mist of Pandora Came into his mind...

     

    One Monkey... To Rule them all..

  • YakkinYakkin irvine, CAPosts: 919Member
    Originally posted by stratasaurus

    I would love to play Wow private servers but when I tried to find one I did not really have any luck.  Prolly just didn't do enough research into it shrug if you have a good place to start I would love a pm.  Anyways the OP seems to already have the answer but just doesn't want to accept it.  Wow was made more for hardcore gamers as that was the only MMO market known at the time.  Casuals eventually became the majority of the playerbase so they tailored the game more for them.  Hardcore players are no more dueche or anything then casuals just the fact is there are more casuals so that maens targetting them gets you the highest sub numbers, if you ran a company you would prolly do the same thing.  Now honestly I always scratch my head at how everyone says "Wow is so easy" but then you go and look at raid progress and the vast vast majority of guilds have not completed all hardcore content.  So if the vast majority of raiding players have not finished the hardest raiding content I don't see how it can all be too easy?

    Doesn't want to accept WHAT exactly?

  • ThorqemadaThorqemada BerlinPosts: 1,277Member Uncommon


    Originally posted by Enigmatus
    Elaboration:

    I've seen statements from various possibly dubious sources stating that WoW was more or less a casualized/easier/less tedious/more colorful version of older MMOs such as Everquest and such, or at the least possessed systems from the MMOs of that time period.

    Thing is, more recently I've seen equally numerous and dubious sources stating that WoW was some kind of hardcore uber difficult and awesome virtual world that was, and I paraphrase, "dumbed down in the name of making money and pandering to brainless teenagers/kids/basement dwellers/whoever the flying fuck they attach a label to."

    Now frankly, this is highly exaggerated, but these two messages I commonly see on forums (yes I know they are a minority in general, but it's not like the SILENT majority are going to tell me much of anything) are so strange and conflicting that I can't help but feel I'm missing something here; a leap in logic or a gap in the timeline if you will.


    There is absolut no logical flaw as WoW started off with a much higher challenge level and a setup that was almost similar to an open world with directed travelpaths.
    Travel i.e. was done per Ship Journey, Flight or Undergropund ingame in real time and not as teleport etc.

    Then the great degradation of WoW and the MMO market started to leave all the wonderfull virtual world concepts stomped into dust for quick and dirty "streamlined" gameplay cashgrabs.

    "Torquemada... do not implore him for compassion. Torquemada... do not beg him for forgiveness. Torquemada... do not ask him for mercy. Let's face it, you can't Torquemada anything!"

    MWO Music Video - What does the Mech say: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FF6HYNqCDLI
    Johnny Cash - The Man Comes Around: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0x2iwK0BKM

  • YakkinYakkin irvine, CAPosts: 919Member
    Originally posted by Thorqemada

    There is absolut no logical flaw as WoW started off with a much higher challenge level and a setup that was almost similar to an open world with directed travelpaths.
    Travel i.e. was done per Ship Journey, Flight or Undergropund ingame in real time and not as teleport etc.

    Then the great degradation of WoW and the MMO market started to leave all the wonderfull virtual world concepts stomped into dust for quick and dirty "streamlined" gameplay cashgrabs.

    Uh...

    How exactly does taking longer to get somewhere = difficulty?

    I get that traveling can be used to make a virtual world feel like a world, but outside of that, it seems more like a means to slow you down if anything.

  • majimaji ColognePosts: 1,992Member Uncommon
    The target audience on release were the casual gamers that were not into MMORPGs yet. Of which there were a lot at that time.

    Let's play Fallen Earth (blind, 300 episodes)

    Let's play Guild Wars 2 (blind, 45 episodes)

  • ZikariZikari SingaporePosts: 78Member

    I started playing WoW on day one of it's release and besides some short contact with Ultima Online it was my first MMO. I think the developers tried to take the Everquest blueprint and bring it to massive Blizzard Fanbase in a polished form. This worked perfectly and the player base exploded way beyond what they expected or targeted.

    Vanilla WoW was not that hardcore as many make it to be, it was less confinded and a bit more sandboxy. PvP happened in the open world as players defined their own targets (Crossroads, Southshore vs. Tarrens Mill and so on). The actual PVE learning curve was relatively smmoth. Including the raids, they ramped up the difficulty with Blackwing Lair and what came after. The Burning Crusade was more Hardcore upon release than Vanilla ever was, especially the dungeon and raid difficulty was way higher, on top there was an ultra complicated attunement system that was a nightmare to manage for guildmasters/raidleaders. Only with the relase of Black Temple and Hyjal they lowerd the difficulty quite a bit (and then smashed everyone with Sunwell).

    For the record played until we cleared Ulduar, then quit, came back for two month to level a new char from 1 to 85 in Cataclysm, but never went back into raiding since...

  • ThorqemadaThorqemada BerlinPosts: 1,277Member Uncommon

    I spoke of the open world in that case which has changed to an instanced moba like gameplay today and mentioned the challenge level only as other aspect.

    To understand the challenge difference you would have to play early wow or a game of a similar challenge level which does not exist today.
    Every single mmo is way easier than it was b4 WoW was released.
    That is not bad at all as people be different and play for different reasons.

    Bad is that WoW is the benchmarksetter for challenge level and almost nobody dares to make a more challenging game.
    The one who try be underfunded indies that deliver underdeveloped products that have a 99.9% chance of failure.

    TSW is being "accused" to be a hard game but in fact its quite easy - people only got used to "easy" gaemplay and now some feel overwhelmed.

    Atm i play the MWO beta (As Founder i am allowed to say this) but sadly i cant tell anything about it.
    Let me say i have stopped to play any other mmorpg since then (but may start to play DDO to stay in touch with my friends of our ex-WoW-Dungeon-group, maybe that game offers some mmorpg challenge).

    -------

    Pandarans - the wives feel the bey very cute and would love to play them.

    "Torquemada... do not implore him for compassion. Torquemada... do not beg him for forgiveness. Torquemada... do not ask him for mercy. Let's face it, you can't Torquemada anything!"

    MWO Music Video - What does the Mech say: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FF6HYNqCDLI
    Johnny Cash - The Man Comes Around: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0x2iwK0BKM

  • Johnie-MarzJohnie-Marz La Puente, CAPosts: 865Member

    The level of min/maxing and theory crafting that goes into Raiding-- I would say it is for Mathmatical geniuses.

    On the other hand questing and leveling are very easy, anyone can do it.

    Those that like to group have thing that need grouping, Those that like playing solo can play solo, you can level by questing, pvp or doing dungeons through the dungeon finder.

    It has battlegrounds but on pvp servers it also has limited but still harsh open world pvp. (Limited because there are some safe areas for beginners, and alliance can't attack alliance, horde can't attack horde.  Harsh because you can be ganked pretty much any time because horde and alliance share many questing areas)

    You can level your guild, you can do achievements, you can run dungeons, you can play mini games.

     

    So in the end, I would say Blizzard is going for a very Broad Appeal. Hardcore, casual, social, alt-o-holics, completionists, ADD, Easter egg hunters, young, old, first timers. Basically there is something for you to do in the game.

    There target audience... Everyone (Whether you think that is good or bad is up to you)

  • YakkinYakkin irvine, CAPosts: 919Member
    Originally posted by Johnie-Marz

    So in the end, I would say Blizzard is going for a very Broad Appeal. Hardcore, casual, social, alt-o-holics, completionists, ADD, Easter egg hunters, young, old, first timers. Basically there is something for you to do in the game.

    There target audience... Everyone (Whether you think that is good or bad is up to you)

    You know what just struck me?

    Broad Appeal, at least IMO, is actually also a niche.

    After all, in broad appeal, you do a ton of stuff decently, but you don't really get any single area beyond good at best.

    http://www.mmorpg.com/discussion2.cfm/post/5287974#5287974

  • VorthanionVorthanion Laguna Vista, TXPosts: 2,117Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Enigmatus

    Elaboration:

    I've seen statements from various possibly dubious sources stating that WoW was more or less a casualized/easier/less tedious/more colorful version of older MMOs such as Everquest and such, or at the least possessed systems from the MMOs of that time period.

    Thing is, more recently I've seen equally numerous and dubious sources stating that WoW was some kind of hardcore uber difficult and awesome virtual world that was, and I paraphrase, "dumbed down in the name of making money and pandering to brainless teenagers/kids/basement dwellers/whoever the flying fuck they attach a label to."

    Now frankly, this is highly exaggerated, but these two messages I commonly see on forums (yes I know they are a minority in general, but it's not like the SILENT majority are going to tell me much of anything) are so strange and conflicting that I can't help but feel I'm missing something here; a leap in logic or a gap in the timeline if you will.

    The difference is perspective.  Hardcores find the game too casual, while casuals find the game, especially end game, too hardcore.  This is what happens when game developers think they can have their cake and eat it too.  Eventually, you end up alienating one segment of your player base over another and in this case, each expansion would swing wildly in one direction then back again, causing all kinds of frustration to the differing player types.  Blizzard's own philosophy is to draw in players with intially casual gameplay, then try to force or indoctrinate them into more hardcore play, such as the raids at end game.  What they didn't take into account was that those casuals would send a huge backlash after the Burning Crusade expansion and they realized their huge mistake and really started to cater more and more to casuals throughout the entire game, not just the earlier levels.

    image
  • DeivosDeivos Mountain View, CAPosts: 1,727Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Enigmatus

    Elaboration:

    I've seen statements from various possibly dubious sources stating that WoW was more or less a casualized/easier/less tedious/more colorful version of older MMOs such as Everquest and such, or at the least possessed systems from the MMOs of that time period.

    Thing is, more recently I've seen equally numerous and dubious sources stating that WoW was some kind of hardcore uber difficult and awesome virtual world that was, and I paraphrase, "dumbed down in the name of making money and pandering to brainless teenagers/kids/basement dwellers/whoever the flying fuck they attach a label to."

    Now frankly, this is highly exaggerated, but these two messages I commonly see on forums (yes I know they are a minority in general, but it's not like the SILENT majority are going to tell me much of anything) are so strange and conflicting that I can't help but feel I'm missing something here; a leap in logic or a gap in the timeline if you will.

    Not that strange or contradicting, you have the first bunch that vetted from older titles who thought it was easy, then you have a second group which had that game set the bar for what they thought of as difficult.

     

    And then it got easier than that.

     

    As for my own opinion on the matter, I've commented on it enough previously. :p

    "The knowledge of the theory of logic has no tendency whatever to make men good reasoners."
    - Thomas B. Macaulay

  • YakkinYakkin irvine, CAPosts: 919Member
    Originally posted by Vorthanion

    The difference is perspective.  Hardcores find the game too casual, while casuals find the game, especially end game, too hardcore.  This is what happens when game developers think they can have their cake and eat it too.  Eventually, you end up alienating one segment of your player base over another and in this case, each expansion would swing wildly in one direction then back again, causing all kinds of frustration to the differing player types.  Blizzard's own philosophy is to draw in players with intially casual gameplay, then try to force or indoctrinate them into more hardcore play, such as the raids at end game.  What they didn't take into account was that those casuals would send a huge backlash after the Burning Crusade expansion and they realized their huge mistake and really started to cater more and more to casuals throughout the entire game, not just the earlier levels.

    You know, I can't help but shake the feeling that "broad appeal" is it's own niche, but I'm not sure why...

  • JimmyYOJimmyYO Columbus, OHPosts: 520Member
    Visa/Mastercard
  • Johnie-MarzJohnie-Marz La Puente, CAPosts: 865Member
    Originally posted by Enigmatus
    Originally posted by Johnie-Marz

    So in the end, I would say Blizzard is going for a very Broad Appeal. Hardcore, casual, social, alt-o-holics, completionists, ADD, Easter egg hunters, young, old, first timers. Basically there is something for you to do in the game.

    There target audience... Everyone (Whether you think that is good or bad is up to you)

    You know what just struck me?

    Broad Appeal, at least IMO, is actually also a niche.

    After all, in broad appeal, you do a ton of stuff decently, but you don't really get any single area beyond good at best.

    You make a good point. 

     

     

  • NildenNilden null, NBPosts: 1,284Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by JimmyYO
    Visa/Mastercard

    Yea it's not like Blizzard is going to annouce a target audience or even had a meeting on it. The target audience is anyone with money who owns a computer.

    How to post links.

    "classification of games into MMOs is not by rational reasoning" - nariusseldon
    Love Minecraft. And check out my Youtube channel OhCanadaGamer

  • Goll25Goll25 bath, PAPosts: 187Member

    The only thing I have to say is that once blizzard implemented, cross realm dungeons + tier gear FULLY purchaseable through currency the game went through a decline. This was about mid-way through wrath.

    Why? People may ask, and I think the answer is simple. No longer did we have to go into the world, honestly. You could make an ALT and once it was 15 you can sit in a main city and dungeon to level 80-85. Or on your main you could sit in que for your heroics untill they popped. The problem created by this was that now the game is being played out more like a lobby based game then anything. People just sit in town waiting for it to pop and hope it is a success.

    What used to be the norm, was you had to go out and find the dungeons for one, two you had to manually group up with people - sure this took time, often an hour + to get a group going for even a 5 man (if your server was dead, and not heroics, usually they were quicker), now the reason this is more of a good thing than a bad thing, is it made players accountable. How? Well, you need to communicate well to start a group/join one, and play in one. As all these players are on your server, being a troll actually has penalties. Also it was a great way to meet new players and such, and play with them later. 

    Also, because the currency being able to purchase great gear right away, as it does now, it really puts a damper on character progression too me, and yet again the community. Why? Because you can skip obsolete content to get a higher level item, and also dungeons dropping raid level gear helps push foward character progression too fast, that players don't struggle to finish content but rather blast through it to catch up with the current high-end raid. Which is ok I guess but it makes the whole experience more menial, and it is hard to explain to a newer player how much fun you used to have struggling with that instance. Where-as back when people, no matter what patch, had to play catch up for a while with  - attunement or gear. Which help give players a sense of accomplishment lacking from wow now.

    Now they have implemented cross realm raids, and now the game is even more "lobby-based" feeling. 

    ON TOP OF ALL OF THIS

    The push on PvP is mostly to instanced battles. Battlegrounds, Rated battlegrounds, arena, and TB are all able to be joined through a simple que, just as PVE is now. So, what ever hope for world pvp, or just being in the world in general, kind of died with pve cross realm grouping (IN MY OWN OPINION!) because it takes a substantial amount of players out of the world. I do miss dearly all the random world pvp (THAT STILL HAPPENED IN WOTLK) that would go on near dungeons and other key points around the world.

     

    DID THIS RUIN THE GAME? No. It really didn't. IS THIS CONSIDERED A NERF? Well more so just on time spent in the game as all blizz did was really take a lot of the old grind out of the game. What this all did negatively though was take away a certain complexity, feeling of wonder, and EXCLUSIVENESS (yes, raiding the latest raid back even untill ulduar I'd say, felt awesome, because not every player could do it. Which is a big reason we play online rpg's, is to honestly be better then the next player! this isn't the only reason, but at times it really does come into affect even if you don't want to admit it. Even pvp gear was more difficult to get, so that has been changed to and feels a hell of a lot less exclusive.).

     

    My final thoughts are:

    WoW, uptill ulduar patch, was wonderful. You had to get out there to find groups to do what ever pve objective you wanted to, not everyone had overkill gear so when doing dungeons it was truely a challange, you had to pay attention a lot more, and you wanted to impress your group members, as you couldn't simple just re-que. So realm community was stronger. World PvP happened a lot because more people where out in the world grouping for raids and dungeons (REMEMBER THOSE TELEPORTING STONES GUYS? lol). It might not have been serious but it was pretty fun. Because gear wasn't purchasable entirely through currency not everyone had time to get insane gear, which kept dungeons hard while making raids exclusive. So a certain sense of accomplishment was there when you completed a goal. So how I feel is that, the content was way more enjoyable, the community was (barely lol) better, and there was just more to do (nothing different, just more of it.)

    Now in cataclysm all I have to do on a new character right now, is sit in orgrimmar, que for dungeons, get carried, purchase w/e set I can, and start working on the valor set which I have a weekly cap on the currency to aquire. Then do the easy mode x-realm raiding. Then get to a guild and knock out some of the "hardest content available." Yawn. Seriously thats it, minus proffesions and all that is seriously it.

    and PvP is roughly the same but with battlegrounds and honor points, once i got the full honor set of gear I farm for the conquest weekly till I have the set, then I can really be taken seriously in arena, yet again - yawn.

     

    Also, I know WoW is not the only game that had this play style, I know it is not the first. WoW wasn't my first MMO (a little game called tibia was hahaha!), but it was the MMO that felt most right to me. The lore, atmosphere, art, gameplay... it just had/has the right aesthetics for me out of the competition.

     

    At the sake of getting more people on the same playing field, blizz cut a lot of the in-depth part out of WoW imo. I'm not even a "hardcore" player, nor a casual, I'm somewhere between the two.  and because of this, I have no desire to continue playing wow every time i resub. I keep popping back in every few months, but can't seem to keep my attention on the game very long. I feel no meaning, no sense of accomplishment, no community to talk to, it's just so bland to me. However I am hoping that MoP may bring back some of my passion for wow, time will tell as I will be trying it out...

     

    In the end this is why I am in love with gw2 right now, nothing feels like a choir above, dungeons are hard, and not having to worry about getting gear makes the game so much more enjoyable. Most of the time i wonder around aimlessly helping people out, crafting, maybe do some hearts, pick up on DE's where I can blah- blah. It is the better way to get more people on a fair playing level then axeing out old content like blizz undenyably has done. 

     

    p.s. I hope people read this and when they do it makes sense, it's 3:30 am now and I am dead tired but really felt like typing this up. If you disagree let me know (politely! please, :)), but I hope a lot of xplayers/and current players at least can see where I am going with this.

    edit: p.s.s. I know this is off topic from the title, but people had brought up some old wow content on the first page and my mind went one-track on this. I don't think blizz has one specific appeal at all though, all ages T+, all races, all types of gamers. They want to rack them into the game and eventually make all the realms interconnected. They are just looking for a high population count. Not on just one specific group.

  • EmerwynEmerwyn MadridPosts: 70Member
    Think you answered yourself. Originally WoW was a game for gamers. Now it's a game for whatever market will bring them more quantity of players. Currently they think the money is in the asian market, so they went with Pandas, oriental settings and monk class. They lost their principles and moralities along with the respect for their own creation over the years in favour of sheer greed.
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