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Upgrading my computer.

DesmothenesDesmothenes Montreal, QCPosts: 4Member

Hey guys. It has been a while since I have played any new MMO out there ( was playing LoL with my friends) and just today I have decided to try the free trial from SWTOR. I am not here to discuss the game, it just that the recommended setting that the game suggests to me  are all "low". I can still play at medium, but it may get "slow" sometimes. So I thought that it is time to get something new for my desktop. My knowledge about computers is very limited ( usually one of my bestfriends takes care of it, but right now he is on vacations in Europe). I'll list the information about my computer below, please, be so kind to suggest what I should upgrade (let me know if I missed some of the specs). My goal would be at least to play at "high" settings without any problem.

Windows 7 Ultimate

32-bit

Processor: Intel(R) Pentium (R) Dual CPU E2200 @ 2.2GHz  2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 4.00GB

Video Card: GeForce 7900 GTX

 

Thanks a lot!

Comments

  • SaintGrayeSaintGraye Los Angeles, CAPosts: 109Member

    The GeForce 7 series was released around 2006 and Intel's E2200 roughly a year later, thus the issue is essentially that you're attempting to run a modern game on a five-year old system, hence the suggested "low" settings.

    My knee-jerk reaction is: scrap the upgrade, it's time for a new computer. Having said that, the most important question is this: what manner of budget are you working with? Tell us that and we can start narrowing down whether a new system is in order or simple upgrades (if upgrades, further information will be required in order to ensure compatability, for instance, motherboard specs and PSU-wattage).

  • DesmothenesDesmothenes Montreal, QCPosts: 4Member

    Thanks a lot for your input, at least now I know the reason why I have this problem. Well, if it has come to this I think I can use from 600-900$ (depends how long I'll continue working on my part time job) in order to get a new computer.

  • SaintGrayeSaintGraye Los Angeles, CAPosts: 109Member

    So you're interested in simply acquiring a new computer? That's excellent.

    1) Would you prefer a pre-built or are you interested in a custom-build? For that matter, are you confident enough to build it on your own or would you prefer the alternative, to whit, using a component-customizer from companies such as Dell?

    2) If "yes" to a custom-and-personal-build, would you mind listing the components in your present machine? The possibility exists we could salvage some parts, thus saving you money. Alternatively, if you'd rather skip that and go with all new hardware, please, reply noting such.

    3) If "yes" to a custom-and-personal-build, do you own a copy of your preferred 64-bit (x64) operating-system? If not, we'll have to figure that into the final cost.

    4) Do you have any company loyalty (read: fanboy) inclinations? For instance, would you rather use an AMD processor even if the Intel chipset proved superior in benchmarking reviews? Or are you partial to using Nvidia's GPUs, etc?

    5) Do you intend to use the $600-900 toward the tower and components alone? That is, do you already have a suitable mouse, keyboard and monitor or should they be included?

     

    EDIT: Also... where do you reside? I'm so used to thinking in terms of my own computer/component purchses (and the sites I use) that I'd neglect to consider taxes/shipping into the potential cost.

  • DesmothenesDesmothenes Montreal, QCPosts: 4Member
    Originally posted by SaintGraye

    So you're interested in simply acquiring a new computer? That's excellent.

    1) Would you prefer a pre-built or are you interested in a custom-build? For that matter, are you confident enough to build it on your own or would you prefer the alternative, to whit, using a component-customizer from companies such as Dell?

    2) If "yes" to a custom-and-personal-build, would you mind listing the components in your present machine? The possibility exists we could salvage some parts, thus saving you money. Alternatively, if you'd rather skip that and go with all new hardware, please, reply noting such.

    3) If "yes" to a custom-and-personal-build, do you own a copy of your preferred 64-bit (x64) operating-system? If not, we'll have to figure that into the final cost.

    4) Do you have any company loyalty (read: fanboy) inclinations? For instance, would you rather use an AMD processor even if the Intel chipset proved superior in benchmarking reviews? Or are you partial to using Nvidia's GPUs, etc?

    5) Do you intend to use the $600-900 toward the tower and components alone? That is, do you already have a suitable mouse, keyboard and monitor or should they be included?

     

    EDIT: Also... where do you reside? I'm so used to thinking in terms of my own computer/component purchses (and the sites I use) that I'd neglect to consider taxes/shipping into the potential cost.

     Bying a new pre-build computer would be an easy way out, however I feel like with all the new games comming about and the requirements changing so fast, now is a perfect time for me to learn a bit about the computers. So I will go with custom-build.

    I would gladly list any component name that you require, however, as it stands now, I have no idea what they are. Is there any way I can find out? Do I need to open my computer to find that information?

    I know that I have a copy of Windows 7 somewhere, however I am not sure if it is 32 or 64. I do not think that will be an issue for me, even if I have to buy it. So if this is needed, I'll get a copy.

    I am certainly not a fanboy of any company. I'll go with the best option for me and it does not matter to me at all who is making the parts I am using.

    Only the components alone. I do not consider my monitor, my mouse and my keyboard anything special, but I am used to them and do not feel like I need to change them now.

    I live in Canada, Montreal.

    Again, thank you for your help!

  • SaintGrayeSaintGraye Los Angeles, CAPosts: 109Member


    Originally posted by Desmothenes
    Bying a new pre-build computer would be an easy way out, however I feel like with all the new games comming about and the requirements changing so fast, now is a perfect time for me to learn a bit about the computers. So I will go with custom-build.
    Honestly, mate, requirements have remained relatively stable for years. A decent computer manufactured circa 2009 or so can still play all modern games without a hitch, given that PC-game development (graphically, at least) is so intrinsically tied to consoles. As they're all aging, rapidly, and the eighth generation consoles remain in development, we're unlikely to see dramatic shifts in requirements for at least another year, perhaps two.

    Still, it's always a good idea to know a little more about what goes on under the hood, so to speak...


    Originally posted by Desmothenes
    I would gladly list any component name that you require, however, as it stands now, I have no idea what they are. Is there any way I can find out? Do I need to open my computer to find that information?
    There are very few components that we'll, possibly, want to salvage. Among these are the PSU (very slight possibility given the gulf in power-consumption between your card and modern variants; for instance, yours run at an average of roughly 84.4 watts, the GTX 560 at nearly 264 watts), your memory and any optical drives.

    Now, the latter are of the least priority, as very little genuine difference exists between one optical drive and the next, while they all tend to retail for roughly the same price ($12-20), but if we can get away with keeping yours, well, why not? To figure this out open up your System Information, expand the "Components" and click on "CD-ROM" then write down the information listed in the "Name" row/s.

    As for memory, typically just cracking open your case and taking a peek will suffice, but this is much faster: visit the following page...http://www.crucial.com/systemscanner/ ...check the little white box and download. Run the program and a scan should be completed in a matter of seconds. The results will appear in a new browser window on the left-hand side. What I'm interested in is the "Memory Type" information. For example, something like this might be displayed...

    Memory Type: DDR2 PC2-6400, DDR2 PC2-8500, DDR2 PC2-5300, DDR2 (non-ECC)
    Maximum Memory: 8GB
    Currently Installed Memory: 4GB
    Total Memory Slots: 4
    Available Memory Slots:  2

    ...in which case you would reply with: DDR2 PC2-6400 (etc...)

    Lastly, you will need to open your case to take a peek at the PSU, save it's sufficiently new to spot a manufacturer's label on the back. Naturally, check that first. In either case, the label should be large and easily seen; what we're looking for is the model number. If you cannot see it, just write down the manufacturer and wattage. For example, a typical model number would be something like "ATP-330S" wherein the manufacturer and wattage are "Antec 330W."


    Originally posted by Desmothenes
    I know that I have a copy of Windows 7 somewhere, however I am not sure if it is 32 or 64. I do not think that will be an issue for me, even if I have to buy it. So if this is needed, I'll get a copy.
    Sounds good, but you really should check on that now... unless you'd rather wait to upgrade until around mid-October, when Windows 8 should be at retail? Of course, as new software that would likely be too great a burden on your budget, but still... check on that copy. It should list the platform architecture on the bottom and back of the case, in addition to the optical disc/s (typically it reads "64-bit x64" or "32-bit x86").

    A 64-bit version of W7 Home Premium is going to run you about $100, which is a rather substantial portion of your funds, whereas a Professional edition is about $140-150 and Ultimate comes in at around $200. These are all OEM licenses, of course, which essentially means one-install-on-one-machine. If you'd rather flat-out purchase a copy of Windows 7, the Home Premium edition is going to retail for around $175, with Ultimate at roughly... oh, $300 or so.


    Originally posted by Desmothenes
    I am certainly not a fanboy of any company. I'll go with the best option for me and it does not matter to me at all who is making the parts I am using.
    Good, good... personally, I'm an Intel/Nvidia guy, but I'll do my utmost to avoid any bias.


    Originally posted by Desmothenes
    Only the components alone. I do not consider my monitor, my mouse and my keyboard anything special, but I am used to them and do not feel like I need to change them now.
    Great! Always nice not being restricted by the need for those...


    Originally posted by Desmothenes
    I live in Canada, Montreal.
    Wonderful, shipping shouldn't be too extravagant and most online computer-component shops can or will use Purolator. I believe Newegg (my preferred retailer) will even expedite your purchase via UPS International or FedEx if you're the impatient type.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,772Member Uncommon

    You're better off replacing the computer than trying to upgrade something that old.  You can probably keep your old peripherals (keyboard, mouse, speakers, monitor, surge protector) if you like them.  But the only other components that you might plausibly be able to keep are the case and optical drive.  Even then, it's sometimes better to leave the old computer intact than to salvage a couple of aging parts from it.

  • SaintGrayeSaintGraye Los Angeles, CAPosts: 109Member
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    You're better off replacing the computer than trying to upgrade something that old.  You can probably keep your old peripherals (keyboard, mouse, speakers, monitor, surge protector) if you like them.  But the only other components that you might plausibly be able to keep are the case and optical drive.

    ...which is precisely why I inquired after them...

  • DesmothenesDesmothenes Montreal, QCPosts: 4Member

    Hey, I am sorry, I was busy the whole day today and could not do the what you have asked me to. I'll do it tomorrow and provide you witht the information you require.

    Just wanted to let you know that I'm still very intrested in your help!

  • SaintGrayeSaintGraye Los Angeles, CAPosts: 109Member

    No worries, mate.

    If I don't get to it, I'm certain someone else on the board will. I'm aware Quizzical, for instance, has aided numerous other MMORPG.com members with similar inquiries, so his input will be welcome, if he chimes in again. If not, I'll certainly keep my eyes peeled. Take care...

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