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help with asus gtx 570

rcefrcef colimaPosts: 11Member

well i got an asus gtx 570 direc CUii, it needs a 6 pin and 8 pin connector but my psu just got 2 pci-e of 6 pin, i connected one of this into the 8 pin connector and it works very well, but i dont know if this can burn the card any help on this pls?

 

pd: srry for my bad english

Comments

  • bronecarbronecar onestiPosts: 685Member

    Originally posted by rcef

    well i got an asus gtx 570 direc CUii, it needs a 6 pin and 8 pin connector but my psu just got 2 pci-e of 6 pin, i connected one of this into the 8 pin connector and it works very well, but i dont know if this can burn the card any help on this pls?

     

    pd: srry for my bad english

     

    I am no expert in such things, the only things I dabble in are software related, I prefer my hardware to be handled by ''professionals'', as if something wrong should happen they can't say it was my fault.

     

    So I figure...if you could pay the money for a 570 (I have one myself), why not go to a PC shop and benefit from a proper advice/montage?

  • KhrymsonKhrymson Eorzea, MOPosts: 3,090Member

     You don't want to do that.   You can purchase 4-pin Molex to 8-pin 12V Power Connectors so I suggest you look into getting one of them or consider buying a better PSU that has the approiate connecters.

    {you can find them cheaper than what I linked too}

     

    Or better yet you can get a 6-pin power to 2x 6+2 pin power cable

  • benzjiebenzjie purmerendPosts: 81Member

    Originally posted by Khrymson

     You don't want to do that.   You can purchase 4-pin Molex to 8-pin 12V Power Connectors so I suggest you look into getting one of them or consider buying a better PSU that has the approiate connecters.

    {you can find them cheaper than what I linked too}

     

    Or buy one of these...http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=21721

    Don't shoot the messenger.....it will ruin you monitor
    image

  • AoriAori Carbondale, ILPosts: 1,886Member Uncommon

    A curious question is, what PSU are you using?

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,775Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Aori

    A curious question is, what PSU are you using?

    This.

    Because whoever made your power supply apparently didn't think it could handle your video card if they didn't give an 8-pin or 6+2-pin PCI-E power connector.

    On the other hand, there's a pretty good chance that one of the power connectors that you're using as a 6-pin is really a 6+2-pin, and you just need to plug in the other two pins and you'll be set.

  • Saxx0nSaxx0n PR/Brand Manager BitBox Ltd. Hell, CAPosts: 817Member Uncommon

    I hope you have at least a 650W or you might have stability issues

  • rcefrcef colimaPosts: 11Member

    well im going to buy a new psu like in one week, right now i got  an atx  800 w, thx for all your help ;)

  • KhrymsonKhrymson Eorzea, MOPosts: 3,090Member

    800w is plenty, but if you don't have the proper power cables, then its a really shoddy aftermarket PSU.  Its probably a good idea to get a better one then, and with a single 570, you won't need more than a 750w PSU.

     

    This Corsair TX750 would be plenty for your PC, and its not too expensive either.  Course before you consider buying it, what PC do you have?  

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,775Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by rcef

    well im going to buy a new psu like in one week, right now i got  an atx  800 w, thx for all your help ;)

    The nominal wattage is a marketing number, not an engineering one.  What's the exact brand name and model of your power supply?

  • Loke666Loke666 MalmöPosts: 17,949Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Originally posted by Aori

    A curious question is, what PSU are you using?

    This.

    Because whoever made your power supply apparently didn't think it could handle your video card if they didn't give an 8-pin or 6+2-pin PCI-E power connector.

    On the other hand, there's a pretty good chance that one of the power connectors that you're using as a 6-pin is really a 6+2-pin, and you just need to plug in the other two pins and you'll be set.

    It probably just means that it is rather old, the quality can still be good enough (they did make good PSUs 10 years ago, just less of them).

    But yeah, the type would help.

    Besides that OP needs a cable adapter, it cost around 3-5 bucks. Most GFX cards sends you one or 2 in the box, I am surprised ASUS didn´t do it this time.

  • rcefrcef colimaPosts: 11Member

    waht do you think about this psu guys? http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6643

    is the one im going to buy, (well is goign to be a gift form my uncle)

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,775Member Uncommon

    That's a piece of junk.

    http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/11/22/cooler_master_gx_650w_power_supply_review/9

    "The Cooler Master GX 650W is a mediocre power supply for couple of years ago, and an outright failure today. The Build Quality of the unit is nothing to write home about (unless it is a warning), the topology is old and outdated, and the exterior is flash over substance. Coupled with this we have mediocre voltage, poor by today's standards efficiency, and out of specification DC Output Quality. One upping this poor showing is that fact that the unit was completely unable to complete our load tests at 100v AC input. That makes the GX 650W not just a failure by our standards, but rather a double failure and an ugly one at that. Making matters worse is the fact that this unit is priced at up to $100 in retail and $70 online. (Users can pick up the much better Seasonic M12II-620Bronze from Amazon with Free Prime Shipping for $98.29). As it stands, there really is not anyone that this unit would be a good fit for that we can think of, and certainly not for its intended crowd of "gamers." Cooler Master should be ashamed and owes all gamers and hardware enthusiasts an apology."

    -----

    Try this:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817703036

    $68 with free shipping, before a $20 rebate.  That should be good enough for you, unless you're doing something unusual.  If you're inclined to spend more for something higher end, you could wait for this to come back in stock:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182068

    Or try one of these:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139020

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182263

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151088

  • NilenyaNilenya TMIPosts: 364Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Khrymson

    800w is plenty, but if you don't have the proper power cables, then its a really shoddy aftermarket PSU.  Its probably a good idea to get a better one then, and with a single 570, you won't need more than a 750w PSU.

     

    This Corsair TX750 would be plenty for your PC, and its not too expensive either.  Course before you consider buying it, what PC do you have?  

    This post and posts like these really confuse me.

     

    I have a 7870HD and a core i7 3770S, an ASRock mobo, 8gigs of Dominator ram at 1866MHz, I have 5 case (200, 140/140 and 120s) fans, and a zalman cooler fan for the cpu -all except the Zal running led, and I have an old Coolermaster 650W psu, and my system gives me absolutely no issues. 

    I kept the psu because it was in working order and because the setup I chose was almost an exact duplicate of one I saw on Toms Hardware, where they had used a psu with 650w, albeit a different type.

     

    So 650W is absolutely fine for the OP, and likely fine for anyone not running sli or crossfire period.

     

    I should mention that the PSU was the ONLY thing I kept from my old duo core/5850 system. 

    I also read about the coolermaster being suckage, and I know of the article, however, when I bought mine years ago, the article did not exist, and so I did not know it would suck, and have since been awaiting the suckage to manifest. Being practical in the sense that if it works, and does not negatively impact my gaming pleasure with its workage quality,  I really could not care less.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,775Member Uncommon

    While a good 650 W power supply is plenty of wattage for the original poster's system (and most gaming systems, for that matter), it is important for it to be a good power supply.

    Is your power supply good?  Just the brand name doesn't tell you.  If you got a Cooler Master GX650, then yeah, it's a piece of junk.  But their Silent Pro power supplies are reasonably nice.

    But how do you know that your power supply has never caused any problems?  Any time something malfunctions in your computer (e.g., a blue screen), the power supply might have been the real culprit.  Or might not.  And even apart from that, how do you know that poor power delivery isn't putting a lot of strain on the rest of your system, and causing the rest of the parts to take a lot more wear and tear than they ought to?  If a power supply takes a year or two to kill some other piece of hardware, it's not automatic that you'll find out about the problem until you end up with dead hardware.

    You might be correct that your power supply hasn't caused problems for you.  But it's a question of how much risk you want to take.  I want my computer to reliably work correctly, not just probably work right but have a substantial (and wholly unnecessary) chance of dying entirely.

  • NilenyaNilenya TMIPosts: 364Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    While a good 650 W power supply is plenty of wattage for the original poster's system (and most gaming systems, for that matter), it is important for it to be a good power supply.

    Is your power supply good?  Just the brand name doesn't tell you.  If you got a Cooler Master GX650, then yeah, it's a piece of junk.  But their Silent Pro power supplies are reasonably nice.

    But how do you know that your power supply has never caused any problems?  Any time something malfunctions in your computer (e.g., a blue screen), the power supply might have been the real culprit.  Or might not.  And even apart from that, how do you know that poor power delivery isn't putting a lot of strain on the rest of your system, and causing the rest of the parts to take a lot more wear and tear than they ought to?  If a power supply takes a year or two to kill some other piece of hardware, it's not automatic that you'll find out about the problem until you end up with dead hardware.

    You might be correct that your power supply hasn't caused problems for you.  But it's a question of how much risk you want to take.  I want my computer to reliably work correctly, not just probably work right but have a substantial (and wholly unnecessary) chance of dying entirely.

    I have had mine for 3 years. If I add all the voltage on my system I dont go above 500w at anytime and thats being enthusiastic about usage. Even if the psu isnt going to deliver a steady 650 on demand, there is alot of givage in that already.

     

    The most a high end single gpu is gonna demand is from 240-300w at peak. Now the gpu is the item in your pc doing the most suckage on your psu (an i7 will use 140 average on peak). There is nothing else in the pc that could make the 650 strain to deliver. 

     

    So whatever issues people have with the coolermaster 650. Unless you're using it while running 2 or more gpu's you will not have to upgrade it unless its actually defective in some manner.  

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