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Networking Issues...

driver4hiredriver4hire ny, NYPosts: 78Member Uncommon

Alright so.. Very recently I bought a new Wireless N router.  A Linksys E2500 Advanced Dual band router.  It seems to work great on every device I own except for my desktop.  Which yes i am running via wireless.  Wired in the location I'm in is not possible which is the reason for the wireless.

My old linksys wireless G router used to occasionally bog whenever I had about 7 devices on the network and I would notice a horrible drop in connection speed(not signal strength) on my desktop.   Pings in games would go to hell and websites just wouldnt load.

 To remedy this I would disconnect and reconnect to the network and all would be well until it happened again some point later on.  This would happen at least once a day during prime time, like when people came home etc. 

 

Now with my new router I bought it with the understanding from the salesmen that it would no longer bog down under load like my old one but to be very honest now I get connection issues on my desktop even when It is the only device on the wireless network.  The network speed just drops down to 1mbs for extended periods of time and it doesn't help when I reset the connection or restart the computer it just seems to go away eventually. 

 

I'm looking for any insight as to what this could be before I go out and buy a different wireless card for my PC which I think is the problem right now. 

My current wireless card is http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833555008 ; Its kind of a piece of garbage I guess but it was the only thing the store had at the time of purchase so I went with it.  I mean how can you go wrong for 13 bucks?  Also any suggestions on a good working PCI wireless card... wireless N capability with 5ghz dual channel etc. would be nice.

 

Thanks in advance

Currently playing : World of Tanks, LoL
Waiting for: The game of my dreams
Played: Everything
Favorites being Eve, UO and SWG Pre-CU

Comments

  • GruntyGrunty TexasPosts: 7,063Member Uncommon

    Do you see any computers on your My Network the you don't recognize? Have you changed the security settings on your wireless router access point? Changed and hidden the SSID?, changed the administrator account password?, activated WPA or WPA2 security? Limited the MAC addresses of devices that are allowed to connect to the access point?

    Are there any metal walls, electric wires or pipes between your PC and the router? Any metal rebar reinforced concrete walls?

  • NitthNitth AustraliaPosts: 3,684Member Uncommon


    Originally posted by driver4hire
    Alright so.. Very recently I bought a new Wireless N router.  A Linksys E2500 Advanced Dual band router.  It seems to work great on every device I own except for my desktop.  Which yes i am running via wireless.  Wired in the location I'm in is not possible which is the reason for the wireless.
    My old linksys wireless G router used to occasionally bog whenever I had about 7 devices on the network and I would notice a horrible drop in connection speed(not signal strength) on my desktop.   Pings in games would go to hell and websites just wouldnt load.
     To remedy this I would disconnect and reconnect to the network and all would be well until it happened again some point later on.  This would happen at least once a day during prime time, like when people came home etc. 
     
    Now with my new router I bought it with the understanding from the salesmen that it would no longer bog down under load like my old one but to be very honest now I get connection issues on my desktop even when It is the only device on the wireless network.  The network speed just drops down to 1mbs for extended periods of time and it doesn't help when I reset the connection or restart the computer it just seems to go away eventually. 
     
    I'm looking for any insight as to what this could be before I go out and buy a different wireless card for my PC which I think is the problem right now. 
    My current wireless card is http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833555008  Its kind of a piece of garbage I guess but it was the only thing the store had at the time of purchase so I went with it.  I mean how can you go wrong for 13 bucks?  Also any suggestions on a good working PCI wireless card... wireless N capability with 5ghz dual channel etc. would be nice.
     
    Thanks in advance

    If its only confined to your desktop that might be a good place to troubleshoot..

    Maybe its the wireless card? change driver - try/borrow different card.

    Also, Maybe interference with other wireless devices phones ect? change the broadcast channel?


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  • ZezdaZezda Posts: 685Member Uncommon

    The wireless card you linked should be able to do N speeds but is not dual band so it might be worth turning off the dual band feature of the router and seeing if that makes any difference.

     

    Usually the other option I would be willing to consider would be to use a directional antenna on the router, but your one seems to be using internal antenna. Something like the Asus RT-N16 is ideal for swapping the antenna over to something more suitable.

     

    [EDIT]

     

    you can also try force the router into b/g only mode and see if the desktop will connect at a more stable connection.

  • driver4hiredriver4hire ny, NYPosts: 78Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by grunty

    Do you see any computers on your My Network the you don't recognize? Have you changed the security settings on your wireless router access point? Changed and hidden the SSID?, changed the administrator account password?, activated WPA or WPA2 security? Limited the MAC addresses of devices that are allowed to connect to the access point?

    Are there any metal walls, electric wires or pipes between your PC and the router? Any metal rebar reinforced concrete walls?

    Don't see any strange computers I live in a pretty sparsely populated area so unless i have a guy in a tent somewhere on my property theres no one else cept me and my family on it.  I changed the security settings on the router to WPA2 security.  My previous router was WEP  I also changed the SSID on the new router to a more suitable name.  I did not touch the MAC addresses either.  Just wood between me and the router wood flooring etc. nothing that would cause too big of an issue. 

     

    I do have old 800mHz portable phones in the house.  I do not see any correlation between them and wireless though.  Just thought I'd mention. 

     

    Tried updating/rolling back the driver and it didn't change.  I can ask a buddy to borrow another card I guess this weekend but he seems to have similar issues.  He told me it was something to do with Windows 7 and wireless N and told me he has a very similar problem with a different router but idk.

     

    I tried to force the router into B/G mode and it actually made it worse so I'm not really sure what the deal is yet.

     

    Thanks for all the replies so far.

    Currently playing : World of Tanks, LoL
    Waiting for: The game of my dreams
    Played: Everything
    Favorites being Eve, UO and SWG Pre-CU

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,788Member Uncommon

    Have you tried running an ethernet cable directly from your desktop to the router or modem, to skip the wireless part of the connection entirely?  Depending on whether that fixes the problem or not, it will let you know if it's a problem with the wireless stuff on your end.

    Wireless is intrinsically unreliable, so you're not going to get a wireless connection as good as a cheap ethernet connection.  The only real question is how much worse the wireless connection will be.

  • driver4hiredriver4hire ny, NYPosts: 78Member Uncommon

    Ran some cable through the house about 200ft (its good ethernet I have a really great wire guy)  Terminated it and tested and worked fine.  CPU runs amazing on wired.  Its faster but not to the point where I should start drilling holes.    My house is a bit excessive in size so I really don't want to start pulling wire... 

     

    Since it runs fine on wired it does isolate the wireless as the issue logically anyway...

     

    Thanks again

    Currently playing : World of Tanks, LoL
    Waiting for: The game of my dreams
    Played: Everything
    Favorites being Eve, UO and SWG Pre-CU

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,788Member Uncommon

    200 feet?  I hope that's because you need a very roundabout route, and not because it's something like 50 feet from your computer to the router.

  • driver4hiredriver4hire ny, NYPosts: 78Member Uncommon

    I'd say "as the bird flies" so to speak my router is within 30ft of where the cpu is but the layout of my house is just rediculus. So don't worry im not that far away with wireless.

    Currently playing : World of Tanks, LoL
    Waiting for: The game of my dreams
    Played: Everything
    Favorites being Eve, UO and SWG Pre-CU

  • driver4hiredriver4hire ny, NYPosts: 78Member Uncommon

    Now I ran into something extremely strange...  Seemed to find a fix for my network but it seems to be program based.  Whenever I run skype it seems to cause the issues... Couldn't explain that one

    Currently playing : World of Tanks, LoL
    Waiting for: The game of my dreams
    Played: Everything
    Favorites being Eve, UO and SWG Pre-CU

  • MMOman101MMOman101 Posts: 1,276Member Uncommon

    I don't use skype, but any "secure" connection can have overhead that diminishes bandwith.  You might want to do some google searches and see what it turns up.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,179Member Uncommon

    I had a similar problem once, and the dropouts turned out to be the upstairs neighbor using the microwave oven... It took me two years, 4 different routers, and probably 7 or 8 various WiFi cards/bridges/connections before I finally just happened to notice my neighbor eating popcorn on her patio...

    WiFi troubleshooting is awfully difficult, as there are just so many variables in it.

    Secondly

    Use an external (USB) WiFi access - they are easy to reposition, they are just as fast and reliable as internal. I have seen a lot of problems with internal WIFI cards because they can pick up interference from inside the case, and it's more difficult to adjust the antenna position to troubleshoot signal strength issues. USB or external ones, you just put it on a USB cable and can move it wherever you want, even on various hubs and such, without having to move your entire computer.

    In fact, I highly recommend using a WiFi bridge rather than a card (sometimes these are sold as gaming adapters). You don't need drivers of any sort for a bridge (a huge plus), you plug in to your ethernet card and it's completely independent of your computer. They can be put anywhere, they just need power and ethernet to whatever devices you want on the WiFi network. They cost a bit more, but can be used with any device with an ethernet port (your computer, XBox, TV, toaster, etc) to give it WiFi access. And they tend to be pretty reliable - I have one that's B/G that I've been using for close to 10 years now. Plug it into a hub or switch and now you have access to give 4/8/any number of devices WiFi access, with a single bridge.

    Dual channel won't do much for you - that's mostly for the router so that it can broadcast two separate WiFi networks on different spectrums (and keep the traffic separated), but for a card/access point it will allow you to connect to either channel. Even Wireless N won't do a whole lot - the internet as a whole is a hell of a lot slower than 11Mb/sec (unless your on fiber), and that's your very basic B/G rate. Your computer can connect to dual channels, but it acts like two separate internet connections, and you get to pick whichever one is the strongest/faster, but they don't get summed up into one super WiFi connection, they act as primary/failover (and if your gaming and the one your using is hiccuping, you have to disconnect/reconnect to continue gaming on the failover connection, because the internal NAT routing changes to the new second IP address).

  • GruntyGrunty TexasPosts: 7,063Member Uncommon

    Googling "Skype and bandwidth" shows that it can use your resources for others benefit.

     

    Skype's EULA allows them to use your system to route other peoples calls

    http://www.skype.com/intl/en-us/legal/terms/tou/

    "5.2 Use of Your Equipment: The Internet Communications Software may use the processing capabilities, memory and bandwidth of the computer (or other applicable device) you are using, for the limited purpose of facilitating the communication and establishing the connection between Internet Communications Software users. If your use of the Internet Communications Software is dependent upon the use of a processor and bandwidth owned or controlled by a third party, you acknowledge and agree that your licence to use the Internet Communications Software is subject to you obtaining consent from the relevant third party for such use. You represent and warrant that by accepting these Terms, you have obtained such consent. "

     

    Try the registry edit found here: http://perfprotector.blogspot.com/2010/07/there-is-bandwidth-hogger-in-my.html

    If it works then make sure all your systems that use Skype are modified.

    "Copy the following text into Notepad and save it as "DisableSkypeSupernode.reg" or "whatever you feel like.reg":



    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesSkype]

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesSkypePhone]

    "DisableSupernode"=dword:00000001

     

    Double-click on the saved file.  Choose "Yes"

    Reboot your machine

     

     

     

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