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For those that don't progress a lot in mmorpgs...

sagilsagil StockholmPosts: 291Member

Due to lack of interest in the beginning or burned out gamer. Would time limit on quests make you not take naps now and then and actually finish the quests and get some nice stuff and experience and to see a potential in the game afterwards? Playing SWTOR I would sometimes relax between the quests and thats why I only got to lv28 and then stopped playing. If it had countdowns on quests, maybe I would be double as higher and very close to max level, and would maybe through this grinding forceness, get to actually enjoy the game because I didn't take naps now and then only to be bored of grinding and stop playing.

 

Discuss.

Comments

  • BigdaddyxBigdaddyx California, WAPosts: 1,986Member Uncommon

    Every MMO that i have played if i play it too much i get burned out pretty quick, doesn't matetr how good the game is excess of everythign is bad. So are you saying that taking breaks is good to keep the freshness in game? if yes..my answer is absolutely. Why do you think players who play 10+ hours a day are the one who complaint the most?

  • PivotelitePivotelite Hamilton, ONPosts: 2,167Member

    It would add a sense of urgency and motivate people to actually try to complete it. However this is just a quick fix on a problem that should be addressed in a different manner.

     

    Instead they should make grinding fun or the quests dynamic to keep peoples interest.

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  • JohnnyBravolJohnnyBravol Toronto, ONPosts: 83Member

    Having a time limit makes sense. It immerses you into the game more and if makes you feel more like you're roleplaying. As life has time constraints, having them in MMORPG's would make the game seem much more lifelike.

  • PsycroatPsycroat Kitchener, ONPosts: 26Member
    I can't agree with a time limit at myself. I think that they take away from a lot of mechanics that the genre was built upon. Picking up multiple quests would be a pain because of the player having to juggle multiple deadlines.

    I think personally I have skipped most timed quests in MMOs I have ever come across because I don't want to fail them if I get myself caught up in the social or exploration aspects that the genre prides itself on.

    The other key thing to note is the monthly fee. Put a timer on things and force people to quest faster and they will run out of things to do. That will force developers to pump out content faster that may not be of equal quality or lose players.

    ~If you run, you'll only die tired~

  • sagilsagil StockholmPosts: 291Member

    There would certainly be other mechanics to get you experience than questing. I played a 2d game for some hours ago, and it had time limit on quests (at least in the beginning), you went through small zones in a big zone through portals, and that way was lead through the story quests. However, I saw side quests too.

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAPosts: 13,672Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by sagil

    Due to lack of interest in the beginning or burned out gamer. Would time limit on quests make you not take naps now and then and actually finish the quests and get some nice stuff and experience and to see a potential in the game afterwards? Playing SWTOR I would sometimes relax between the quests and thats why I only got to lv28 and then stopped playing. If it had countdowns on quests, maybe I would be double as higher and very close to max level, and would maybe through this grinding forceness, get to actually enjoy the game because I didn't take naps now and then only to be bored of grinding and stop playing.

    Discuss.

    Part of the reason they may be levelling slow is because the game is nothing but an unending series of quests. Another reason would be that their primary goal may not be to get to 'endgame' faster.

    For you, the problem is napping between quests. Most slow levellers are actually dong something else - exploring, window shopping, crafting, socializing etc. Solving your particular problem would just create another reason for the others to focus less on quests.

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • Loke666Loke666 MalmöPosts: 18,028Member Uncommon

    Well, you could limit the time you have on quests or limit the time you play the game every day but the fact is that this is probably the biggest flaw in modern MMO: Too many short quests.

    A better solution is to get rid of the overfilled questlogs all MMOs have, they don´t actually make the game more fun.

    Several games are trying different ways, all from GW2s DEs to TSWs one main quest and one side quest at the same time, nothing more.

    Whatever method you use MMOs needs to focus you more on doing what you do at the time. If quests are too survive in the future they need to be fewer, larger and feel more epic than they have in the pasts. Having a full quest log takes away the importance of the quests and turn the story from being about stuff of legends to you mostly doing silly jobs for a bunch of loser npcs that can´t wipe thier own %&¤.

    A MMO should feel like an epic movie or book, or at least should themepark MMOs feel like that. Sandbox games could be about building stuff, logistics or intrigues and are a very different type of games.

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