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General: Is F2P Ruining Korea’s Youth?

SBFordSBFord Associate Editor - News ManagerThe Land of AZPosts: 16,619MMORPG.COM Staff Uncommon

The Korean government is increasingly active in it pursuit of limitations on youth gaming. Is this a good idea? What are the reasons behind the attention? Check out The Free Zone to find out and then let us know what you think.

It would be a definite stretch to answer the question above in the affirmative. However, the past couple of weeks have brought news that the Korean government is continuing to increase its efforts to restrict the amount of time its young people can spend playing online video games. Accordingly, it seems clear that the popularity of online games is perceived not just as a problem, but as one serious enough to warrant considerable attention and some serious regulations. There can be no real argument that free to play has contributed significantly to the growth of the market. So, it’s not much of a leap to think the powers that be may see it as a causal factor, albeit certainly not the sole one.

Read more of Richard Aihoshi's The Free Zone: Is F2P Ruining Korea’s Youth?

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Associate Editor: MMORPG.com
Follow me on Twitter: @MMORPGMom

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Comments

  • 77lolmac7777lolmac77 Herp Derp, PAPosts: 496Member
    Limiting somethings availability only increases demand.

    When will world leaders figure this out?
  • BlackbrrdBlackbrrd KongsbergPosts: 811Member

    I am watching close to daily matches of Starcraft 2, broadcasted by gomtv.net. Very entertaining and it's very complex. ;)

  • DauzqulDauzqul Detroit, MIPosts: 1,406Member Uncommon

    I used to be addicted to video games. From 2004 to 2008, I always had a hardcore MMO and FPS to play. I probably gave a good 10-12 hours of play per day. After the hard quit, I was certainly a more productive. Since 2008, I finished college, got married, started a business, purchased a home, and now have a beautiful daughter!

    It's obvious that most of these gamers will be more productive if their game-time is limited. However, I feel that this is a choice that the player should make. This is like the US government placing an obesity sanction on how much a person can eat per day. Too much government!



     

  • zymurgeistzymurgeist Pittsville, VAPosts: 5,212Member Uncommon

    If we limit game time who's going to operate our third generation aerial combat drones? We could lose world war 3.

    "Strong and bitter words indicate a weak cause" ~Victor Hugo

  • FusionFusion VaasaPosts: 1,391Member Uncommon

    "telling man what he can and cannot do with his own life" has never ended up with good results.

    Currently playing: -

    Waiting for: Class4.

    Dead and Buried: ESO, NWO, GW2, SWTOR, Darkfall, AO, AC2, Vanguard, CoH/V, EnB, EVE, Neocron, FE, EQ, EQ2, DAoC, FFXI, FFXIV, SWG, WoW, and billions of eastern junks!

  • SasamiSasami HelsinkiPosts: 326Member

    "It's not a war on drugs, it's a war on personal freedom, it´s what it is ok?. Keep that in mind at all times. Thank you!"

    -- Bill Hicks

  • ShazkneeShazknee IshøjPosts: 81Member

    Let them sign up for the Betty Ford clinic

  • WhySoShortWhySoShort KunmingPosts: 315Member

    I know a lot of Koreans, and I can say with complete confidence that Korean parents are to blame for the Korean Video Game Crisis. What keeps them from telling their kids how long and at what time they can game? Nothing. And yet they want the government to do that for them. I saw something similar in my school: Korean parents wanted school uniforms. Why? Because apparently they can't tell their kids what they can and can't wear. So now the governent is everyone's parent. 

    image

  • FaelanFaelan CopenhagenPosts: 826Member Uncommon

    Restricting just makes people defiant. If the old farts in the Korean government think they'll be able to control some of the brightest young people in the world, then they're in for a rude awakening. It'll be just as pointless as all the attempts that have been made to stop software piracy. Those who want to, will find ways around it. And if they do catch someone gaming more than the law allows for, what are they going to do? Stick 'em in jail with the harcore criminals? Boarding school? Fine the parents? Is that going to help? Is that going to solve the problem?

    I think the important question that needs answering is not how they can be controlled. The important question is, why do they get addicted to begin with? Once you know the cause, it may turn out that there are other and better ways of dealing with the problem.

    I'm a big ol' fluffy carewolf. Be afraid. Be very afraid.

  • SovrathSovrath Boston Area, MAPosts: 18,460Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by mmoDAD

    I used to be addicted to video games. From 2004 to 2008, I always had a hardcore MMO and FPS to play. I probably gave a good 10-12 hours of play per day. After the hard quit, I was certainly a more productive. Since 2008, I finished college, got married, started a business, purchased a home, and now have a beautiful daughter!





    It's obvious that most of these gamers will be more productive if their game-time is limited. However, I feel that this is a choice that the player should make. This is like the US government placing an obesity sanction on how much a person can eat per day. Too much government!










     

    Well, I think you put your finger on it. You filled your life with meaingful pursuits.

    When people don't have something meaningful in their lives they fill it with things that are pleasurable. Whether these things are good over the long term is another thing entirely.

  • GrumpyMel2GrumpyMel2 Catskills, NYPosts: 1,832Member

    Different cultures and countries have different attitudes and traditions about the governments/societies proper relationship with the individual.

    In the U.S. at least we have a fairly strong tradition that it's not the governments place to regulate an individuals behavior except where such behavior transgresses against the rights of another individual. Admitedly that tradition has been under assault from many quarters for a long time and has been sadly eroded, especialy in recent years...but at least it still resonates with many Americans.

    I'm guessing that Korea's traditions are somewhat different and they may tend to be somewhat more used to the concept of government playing a paternalistic role in society?

    Regardless of that, I think it's important for the Korean government and it's citizens to recognize two things. Firstly that game addiction can be a real problem for people, particularly youth. Secondly, it's futile to attempt to "cure" an addiction over the long term by trying to control or police thier behavior. The addict will just eventualy find some way around those controls to indulge thier addiction...or failing that shift thier addictive behavior to some other object that is equaly unhealthy. The real way to fix that problem over the long term has to come from the addict themselves. They have to recognize for themselves that thier behavior is unhealthy and WANT to change it.  The only thing anyone can do in that regard, is to try to make enough information availble for the addict to recognize thier own problems and what they can do about it....that and let them accept responsibilty for the negative consequences to themselves that thier addict behavior results in.

    Anything else is about as effective as spitting into the wind.

  • troublmakertroublmaker St. George''s, NFPosts: 337Member

    Originally posted by 77lolmac77

    Limiting somethings availability only increases demand.



    When will world leaders figure this out?

    If demand is increased price is also likely to increase making it a very good economic decision.  In its current unlimited form free is very much a part of the high amount of time people play these games.

    Website: http://www.thegameguru.me / YouTube:

  • EladiEladi ArnhemPosts: 1,100Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by troublmaker

    Originally posted by 77lolmac77

    Limiting somethings availability only increases demand.



    When will world leaders figure this out?

    If demand is increased price is also likely to increase making it a very good economic decision.  In its current unlimited form free is very much a part of the high amount of time people play these games.


     

    prize increase will increase Ilegal gaming halls were it will be easy to get the yought into contact whit other more harmfull products (alchohol, drugs and the whole list of unhealthy habbits before those extreme's)

    its bin long proven that there is only one thinng that helps against any form unhealty behavior, parental watch.  this counts for everyting. 20 years go it was parties and alchohol that was 'cool" 40 years ago it was drugs  both were highly populair ,both caused more deaths, both still cause more deaths and messed up lives.  60 years ago it was rock&roll. 

    kids will never chance, the searts for trills and belonging will never chance, only the substance will.  after 60years or so I would think we learned a few lessons what not to do hm?

  • MadnessRealmMadnessRealm Montreal, QCPosts: 2,716Member Uncommon

    Don't hate the game, hate the players. Afterall, a game can't be irresponsible, but players on the other hand...

    ------
    Your daily dose of common sense since 2009!

  • MehveMehve Kitchener, ONPosts: 487Member

    Originally posted by GrumpyMel2

    Different cultures and countries have different attitudes and traditions about the governments/societies proper relationship with the individual.

    In the U.S. at least we have a fairly strong tradition that it's not the governments place to regulate an individuals behavior except where such behavior transgresses against the rights of another individual. Admitedly that tradition has been under assault from many quarters for a long time and has been sadly eroded, especialy in recent years...but at least it still resonates with many Americans.

    I'm guessing that Korea's traditions are somewhat different and they may tend to be somewhat more used to the concept of government playing a paternalistic role in society?

    Well, if you look at the history of the two areas, the U.S. has a strong history in resisting authority, while East Asia has a strong history in unquestionable government and social tiers (a generalization, I know). It's not unthinkable to expect that such history still resonates today, and influences how people react to what their government tries to do.

    That said, part of the problem with the addiction (whatever the actual degree is) likely lies in the F2P propensity for gambling style activities in their cash shop. Surprise boxes, gatchapon, in-game enhancement/enchant/etc protection, all kinds of RNG-based progression methods. The addiction of gambling activities is well documented, after all. And yet a cash shop buffer apparently completely removes the requirement for the accountability that a casino or lottery would be subject to.

    A Modest Proposal for MMORPGs:
    That the means of progression would not be mutually exclusive from the means of enjoyment.

  • zellmerzellmer Fakesville, WIPosts: 442Member

    For all the people that complain about bullies they provide a VERY valuable service!

    If it wasn't for the kids that where 6 feet in middle school taunting the nerdy kids or beating them up, the kids might have become addicted or thought it was "alright" to do nothing but just play games every minute they could!

    Can't we just ship a few kids over there to teach them how stupid it is?

  • Cyberdeck7Cyberdeck7 Fingerlakes area, NYPosts: 239Member

    so then... you're against what another country is doing to get kids to play less and go outside more because of the terminology they're using? You think the hours these kids are putting in are OK?

  • UgerothUgeroth Umatilla, FLPosts: 13Member Common

    Originally posted by WhySoShort

    I know a lot of Koreans, and I can say with complete confidence that Korean parents are to blame for the Korean Video Game Crisis. What keeps them from telling their kids how long and at what time they can game? Nothing. And yet they want the government to do that for them. I saw something similar in my school: Korean parents wanted school uniforms. Why? Because apparently they can't tell their kids what they can and can't wear. So now the governent is everyone's parent. 




     

    ^ I completely agree. I think it shouldn't be a matter of government control. It really just comes down to bad parenting if you have a kid who's playing video games so much that it's detrimental to his health. Know how my parents handled that situation with me? Took away the power cord and said "Go play outside." Problem solved.

    @zellmer: Rofl.

  • YamotaYamota LondonPosts: 6,620Member

    F2P is ruining MMORPGs period.

  • Four0SixFour0Six Missoula, MTPosts: 1,181Member Uncommon

    ANYONE who thinks this kind of government involvement is good, should spend some time in a work camp.

    I could go into a long drawn out rant, but I wont.

    Read some classic literature: Brave New World, Farenheit 451, then go get an old copy of Logans Run and watch that.

     

  • JazKW347JazKW347 Vandalia, OHPosts: 54Member

    Originally posted by Yamota

    F2P is ruining MMORPGs period.




     

    That is debatable, but overall 90% true. Prime example I can think of off the top of my head would be Champions Online. The game was originally released as a P2P (Pay to Play) game, it was doing sorta well, but it was racking in big numbers, so then Cryptic decided to go F2P. A few months after the game F2P, PWE aquires Cryptic (Along with CO and Star Trek Online). Thats really when things went to hell. They start releasing lotto boxes and more stuff that you would have to buy (on top of a real $15 a month sub or  just regualre F2P players) good items for in-game use. Also, the rate of content came to a halt as well. In general, the F2P model can ruin games, over time they are ungodly expensive if you want a good character, and many times (especially with PWE games) the leveling is a complete and total grind fest, which is perhaps the only reason they can keep players around.

    OK, I'm done ranting, go on with your lives. 

    image
  • SkuzSkuz WorcesterPosts: 1,034Member Uncommon

    Finally an article by this writer that has some teeth in it.

    My opinion is that if the problem is as bad as the Korean government says it is then it is a failure of Korean society to have parenting be responsible and accountable, whilst a hi-tech society will inevitably have opportunities these need to be overseen by responsible parents setting meaningful parameters, the tools are available to assist them in doing so, I myself manage my own child's online activities by way of such management tools.

    When the government is saying it has to intervene it's a big fat warning sign, either of oppression or of something deeper in society going badly wrong, I don't live there so I can't say which it is.

  • InFaVillaInFaVilla StockholmPosts: 592Member

    Originally posted by MadnessRealm

    Don't hate the game, hate the players. Afterall, a game can't be irresponsible, but players on the other hand...




     

    Given the right tools, you can make any person kill their parents and siblings. Putting all responsability on the individuals is a fatal mistake; the system often holds a part, of varying degree, of the responsability as well. 

     

    Just imagine a world identical to ours but where everyone had instant access to unlimited supply of free heroin. A such world would be forced to deal with far higher costs and misery due to larger heroin-usage. The system causes a systematic problem.

  • InFaVillaInFaVilla StockholmPosts: 592Member

    Originally posted by Skuz

    Finally an article by this writer that has some teeth in it.

    My opinion is that if the problem is as bad as the Korean government says it is then it is a failure of Korean society to have parenting be responsible and accountable, whilst a hi-tech society will inevitably have opportunities these need to be overseen by responsible parents setting meaningful parameters, the tools are available to assist them in doing so, I myself manage my own child's online activities by way of such management tools.

    When the government is saying it has to intervene it's a big fat warning sign, either of oppression or of something deeper in society going badly wrong, I don't live there so I can't say which it is.




     

     

    Or maybe just a government that has the balls to do something about a major problem, for the best of their citizens?  Sometimes, you can't just watch at your country, give them the tools and hope for the best; sometimes you need to man up and take action.

     

    The obesity issue in certain countries is a such problem that governments should deal with in more extreme manners. 

  • troublmakertroublmaker St. George''s, NFPosts: 337Member



    Originally posted by Eladi








    Originally posted by troublmaker














    Originally posted by 77lolmac77







    Limiting somethings availability only increases demand.















    When will world leaders figure this out?




    If demand is increased price is also likely to increase making it a very good economic decision.  In its current unlimited form free is very much a part of the high amount of time people play these games.














     





    prize increase will increase Ilegal gaming halls were it will be easy to get the yought into contact whit other more harmfull products (alchohol, drugs and the whole list of unhealthy habbits before those extreme's)





    its bin long proven that there is only one thinng that helps against any form unhealty behavior, parental watch.  this counts for everyting. 20 years go it was parties and alchohol that was 'cool" 40 years ago it was drugs  both were highly populair ,both caused more deaths, both still cause more deaths and messed up lives.  60 years ago it was rock&roll. 





    kids will never chance, the searts for trills and belonging will never chance, only the substance will.  after 60years or so I would think we learned a few lessons what not to do hm?










     

    This argument is called a "slippery slope" argument.  It states that if A happens B follows.  The slippery slope argument is falicious because it appeals to feelings instead of antecedents.  For example a common slippery slope argument is that "if gay marriage is legalized incest and inter-species marriages will be legal."

    While this might be true the question a person asks is "why is it true."  Your entire argument is one giant slippery slope.

    The prohibition argument is a common one for allowing anything.  But it doesn't stand.  For example if people enjoy eating bananas you can stop the vast majority of banana consumption by limiting imports on bananas.  The prohibition argument (which can be applied to ANYTHING AT ALL) then tells us that illegal bananas will come into the country.

    Well that's fine, we can fight that with police actions.  The big reason why prohibition failed as a policy was because it would have cost the American public too much to police.  But it would not cost the Korean government so much to flip the switch with their existing Internet scheme.

    The program in place is to shut off the Internet on these kids after they have done so much gaming.  Korea can do this pretty easily with their existing Internet standards.  Obviously exceptions can be made for professional gamers (who make a living off of it).


     

    Website: http://www.thegameguru.me / YouTube:

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