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"RUSH! RUSH!" Mentality of gamers today would minimize ANY mmo

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  • MindTriggerMindTrigger La Quinta, CAPosts: 2,596Member

    The rushing is easily attributable to level-based gameplay.  Games like SWG back in the early days, allowed you to change professions (classes) whenever you wanted to, and it only took a few days to a week to max again.  Games today rely on leveling (the carot and the stick) in order to motivate players through the game.  This is what happens when you take the 'virtual world' out of your game and turn it into virtual disneyland instead.

    A sure sign that you are in an old, dying paradigm/mindset, is when you are scared of new ideas and new technology. Don't feel bad. The world is moving on without you, and you are welcome to yell "Get Off My Lawn!" all you want while it happens. You cannot, however, stop an idea whose time has come.

  • XAPKenXAPKen Northwest, INPosts: 4,913Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Group questing has its own problems though.  Namely it's very difficult to find a group of people that happen to be similar to your level, happen to be at the same point in a quest chain, and just happen to be online and in the same area at the same time.

     

    Quest chains are anti-grouping, but one I see issues with more often is gathering quests.  5 people killing rats to collect 10 tails, the drops are not full-party, the drop rate doesn't go up.  Having 5 people just means it takes 5 times as long.  Given low population and slow respawns, 5 people killing the same thing isn't 5 times faster.  Many times it's felt like it was no faster than just doing it solo.  It's a lose-lose scenerio both for quest XP and kill XP.

     

    I'm not in favor of forced grouping.  But it sure would be nice if grouping wasn't so badly gimped.


    Ken Fisher - Semi retired old fart Network Administrator, now turned Amateur Game Developer.  I don't Forum PVP.  If you feel I've attacked you, it was probably by accident.  Realm Lords 2 on MMORPG.com
  • mmoguy43mmoguy43 , CAPosts: 2,439Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Originally posted by Goatgod76


    Originally posted by nerovipus32

    MMORPG'S are not virtual worlds anyore they are games filled with anti-social features such as leaderboards, achievements and solo quests which all focus on individual success, other players just get in your way while you quest so screw them right????. These games are designed from the start to be anti-social.

    As I said in my post above yours....console game generation invaded the MMO genre...now they are the majority and turning MMO's into console games with super multi-player they don't even utilize.

     

    But even when I play FPS games, or strategy games...if they are multi-player...everyone is always in a big damn rush.

    I don't really buy that the "players" are the reason for the rush mentality in MMORPGs.  Simply because I usually rush through modern MMORPGs but I don't rush through other games.  There just isn't any reason to "smell the flowers" in MMORPGs...there's not much there to smell.  After you do the quests in an area, the area is just full of motionless NPCs that don't do anything...there's nothing left to do but move on.  There's no player towns or other dynamic things to discover, and anything worth finding usually has a quest to point you at it.

    SPRPGs just provide a much richer world to explore.  I can walk around for hours in the Elder Scrolls games just doing crap and enjoy myself.  But WoW or Rift?  No way.  If you aren't questing, PvPing, or doing dungeons then you really aren't playing.  And that's the problem.

    Still though, you can insert a player into ES games that could care less about story, is highly focused on objectives (no wandering around doing pointless stuff), who plays mostly for the combat. How can you then still say it's not the player, it's the game?

     

    A game can be more inviting to a certain type of player but its still the players that decide how to play it.

  • WizardryWizardry Ontario, CanadaPosts: 8,436Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Grahor

    Well, may be if games with their p2p model weren't charging us for doing nothing, people wouldn't be in such a hurry? :)

     

    May be if I had more than half an hour a day to play I wouldn't be in a hurry, too?

     

    Also, most of those people probably level their tenth toon.

    Well those are legit points ,however why are people then CLAIMING and telling us they are having fun,for "doing nothing"?

    Seriously if you only have 30 minutes ,you shouldn't be playing a MMORPG.Would you join a hockey league or a baseball league if you only have 30 minutes?Would you goto a movie if you only had 30 minutes?

    An that is a NO to the tenth toon,this RUSH...RUSH is EXACTLY what people do from minute 1.They treat ALL these games like single players games,like they are trying to beat something.

    This is the VERY reason AOC received criticism,because most raced through so fast,the devs didn't have enough higher level content ready,so they cried foul,when it was their own fault.

    Of course  the blame is 50/50,the developer NEEDs to design a game with reason and purpose,level 1 should feel as compelling as level 81.

    IMO there is a VERY simple fix,for all those lazy cheap devs who won't put the depth into their game.All they need to do is create a system where if you RUSH into the next level you chance having a weaker player in the long run.This way players will stick around to develope their player.

    A simple example without   putting much thought into it.......

    Each level you work to attain a max set of stats for certain areas.Once you pass that level you cannot attain any more stats from that level.So if for example you could attain 5 STR per level ,then by level 50 you could have a max total of 200 str.If you rush into level 2 before attaining all 5 str ,then sorry about your luck,it is YOUR choice.How you attain these stats would be in the design and imo best done utilizing a group and team work.


    Samoan Diamond

  • jeremyjodesjeremyjodes antioch, ORPosts: 679Member

    Themeparks by their very nature are created with pacing mechnaics in them. I was in counteless guilds were they only wanted to gear for end game. the goal was to hit all the new content with a group and get that worlds first. they never stopped to sit in-game. they never took breaks to piss or whatever.

    What happened is they got the ultimate goal achieved and forgot that once they reach that goal you have to wait for devs to make more.

    It happens to all themepark MMOs. It's my belief that MMO's should be what is now called "sandparks". they should have themed pacing mechanics but also allow RPers to be able to create some of that content. right now, developers spend a great deal of time trying to balance game mechanics and gear stats. Carrot on a stick has never stopped people who want to rush from not spending countles hours racing through a game.

     

     

    image

  • Creslin321Creslin321 Baltimore, MDPosts: 5,359Member

    Originally posted by mmoguy43

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Originally posted by Goatgod76

    Originally posted by nerovipus32

    MMORPG'S are not virtual worlds anyore they are games filled with anti-social features such as leaderboards, achievements and solo quests which all focus on individual success, other players just get in your way while you quest so screw them right????. These games are designed from the start to be anti-social.

    As I said in my post above yours....console game generation invaded the MMO genre...now they are the majority and turning MMO's into console games with super multi-player they don't even utilize.

     

    But even when I play FPS games, or strategy games...if they are multi-player...everyone is always in a big damn rush.

    I don't really buy that the "players" are the reason for the rush mentality in MMORPGs.  Simply because I usually rush through modern MMORPGs but I don't rush through other games.  There just isn't any reason to "smell the flowers" in MMORPGs...there's not much there to smell.  After you do the quests in an area, the area is just full of motionless NPCs that don't do anything...there's nothing left to do but move on.  There's no player towns or other dynamic things to discover, and anything worth finding usually has a quest to point you at it.

    SPRPGs just provide a much richer world to explore.  I can walk around for hours in the Elder Scrolls games just doing crap and enjoy myself.  But WoW or Rift?  No way.  If you aren't questing, PvPing, or doing dungeons then you really aren't playing.  And that's the problem.

    Still though, you can insert a player into ES games that could care less about story, is highly focused on objectives (no wandering around doing pointless stuff), who plays mostly for the combat. How can you then still say it's not the player, it's the game?

     

    A game can be more inviting to a certain type of player but its still the players that decide how to play it.

    The difference between ES games and modern MMORPGs is that in ES games you have a choice of how you want to play it.  In an ES game, you could just rush through all the main quests and call it a day, or you can just get lost in the world and have fun.  You can do both, it supports many different kinds of playstyles.

    In modern MMORPGs, you really don't have this choice.  You will do the content on the table in front of you.  And that is normally quests, PvP, dungeons, raiding, and crafting.  If you try to explore the game and play it more "freeform" you will be disappointed.

    Once again, the difference is choice.  I really wouldn't care if a bunch of players were rushing through an MMORPG that gave you a choice of playing more freeform, because I know there would be other players like me that want to just enjoy the game.

    It's the same with the older Final Fantasy games and FF XIII.  In the older FF games, you could do the main quest, or you could just explore, find towns, secret monsters, crazy NPCs..etc etc, there was a lot of choice there and tons of options.  But FF XIII?  You are literally on a rail for almost the entire game, and a narrow rail at that, you can't do anything but go forward.

    Are you team Azeroth, team Tyria, or team Jacob?

  • nerovipus32nerovipus32 dublinPosts: 2,735Member

    Developers need to stop focusing on end game content and appeasing the small percentage of players that run it and instead create more lateral content.

  • Creslin321Creslin321 Baltimore, MDPosts: 5,359Member

    Originally posted by nerovipus32

    Developers need to stop focusing on end game content and appeasing the small percentage of players that run it and instead create more lateral content.

    I agree.

    The entire concept of "end game" is just a side effect of trying to graft a standard SPRPG campaign and leveling system (which must be finite) onto an MMORPG.

    Are you team Azeroth, team Tyria, or team Jacob?

  • dreamer05dreamer05 Kansas City, MOPosts: 545Member Uncommon

    I'd have to agree with the OP.  It seems though that that is what kind of game the majority of players want, and so the companies keep making games for them.  It's a hard situation because as someone who stays ver busy  myself it's nice having a casual friendly game, but it also at the same time seems to take away the fun and immersion I have experienced in more 'hardcore' games.

    image

    "God, please help us sinful children of Ivalice.."

  • MMOPlayaMMOPlaya Los Angeles, CAPosts: 98Member

    Originally posted by zaxtor99

    We see it all the time.

    A hot new mmorpg launches. And you grab it at your local department store or game store a day or two after its launch day. You've been anxious to try this game forever it seems!

    You install it, it updates...

    You log into a character creation screen and spend some good time creating your virtual hero. It's "fun" to make his/her stats just as you desire, to make him/her look just like you imagine.

    And you lean back relaxing in your desk chair as you log into this new and vast open world.

    You don't even move your character for several long seconds as you just take in the graphical beauty that you see. You see NPC dogs and cats scattering about. Amazingly life-like birds flying off of nearby tree branches, and the clouds off in the distance look so real, make you feel as if a real storm is coming in. You have been logged in for just a couple of moments and are already getting sucked in. Wow, just wow.

    It isn't until that moment that something else can take you OUT of this virtual masterpiece. It's the sight of seeing other people also logging into this world where you stand in awe. You watch them. All of them. Do they take even a few seconds as you have to look at their new world? To maybe read the help windows showing them how to play the game? Do they even notice that storm on the horizon or the birds realistic manners? The answer to all these questions for every new avatar you see logging in is an almost rudely screaming "HELL NO!".

    They all do it. They IMMEDIATELY run for the edge of town. For the first quest in town. They hack away at the level 1 mobs and too quickly try to take down that level 3 mob. They are in a HURRY! RUSH! RUSH! ..get that quest and GO! Get that mob and loot it without even noticing what the heck it is you just looted!! LOOT ALL! SELL! ATTACK! TURN in QUEST!! RUSH! RUSH!

    This facet of mmo games today is what truly can kill the mood in my opinion, no matter how much attention to detail the company put into the game. Nobody wants to just 'relax' and have fun anymore. And I don't really understand it. Why do people want to go buy a game like this and spend hours just trying so hard trying to RACE to max level or to RACE to max out their crafting skills? - Doesn't ANYONE out there still want to have FUN and ENJOY this mmo that was in development for the past six years!??

    I've been in groups before where people care less about the chat and talk within. They complain that they are leveling up too slowly. But you're having fun! Who cares if we don't the perfect group compilation as you've already figured out. No we shouldn't kick that second mage out rudely just to get a Paladin in here! But nobody listens. The group breaks up because nobody else is happy unless they are gaining at least 67,000 experience per hour. They are gonna skip real life dinner and eat pizza at their computer so that they can be level 13 before 8pm. They've all got it figured out!

    {{ Sigh... }}

    Perhaps this is one reason why nobody can seem to find that "perfect mmo" any more. Perhaps we ALL have forgotten how to actually take whatever world it is, and actually have "fun". So what if the game doesn't have your idea of the perfect PvP or skill sets. It can still be a heck of a lot of 'fun' if we just allow our mindsets to change a little. Perhaps we don't all need to figure the game out so much that we feel like we have the most perfect avatar with the most perfect choices for advancement and gear. Couldn't we all just learn to kick back, relax, and take in the masterful beauty that we might see within one of these worlds without getting mad at the game because the level advancement is too slow for our taste?

    Are we all really becoming mmo power levelers somewhere inside and making these games work instead of a place to enjoy and have fun?

    I know people want their style of game. I get that. But it doesn't matter what game I play anymore. Every mmo from Darkfall to Rift is exactly the same. There is a lot of fun to be had in both of these games and all 300 mmo games between them. I really think that most of us have forgotten that aspect. Maybe, just maybe we should change US and how we act/play these games before worrying about how these games need to be more how we want them to be.

    That's all I am saying. And I'm talking as much to myself here as anyone else.

    Breathe. Look at the detail in those blades of grass blowing in the wind and those rugged snow capped mountains in the distance. WoW. Take it in, slow down, you don't need to be max level by this weekend for crying out loud. Let's learn to PLAY and have something called FUN again in all these amazing new worlds we have available today huh?

    Just a random thought.



    - Zaxx

     Dear Sir -

    I 100%, whole-heartedly, without-a-doubt agree with what you are saying here.  You are the type of player I wish to group with.  Will you be playing SWTOR?  If so, we need to hook up on the same server.  By the way, do you play RIFT?  I have a guild called <Days Of Yore> http://doy.guildlaunch.com which appears to fit right up your alley.  Our motto is "WE DO NOT RUSH".

    PM me!

  • dzoni87dzoni87 BelgradePosts: 541Member

    To the OP:

    That is a sad destiny that Genre is heading to as a whole. End-game is major part of all new MMORPGs despite it being only the sorry 10% of the game. I dont know how, but communities of today's MMORPGs started to care very very much about capped-out levels and gear, about Gear Score or w/e, about many achievement as possible, about having most possible things in shortest time. Hence the complaining about lacking of endgame, and about to little stuff to do on max level.

    Like some guy above said it all about the score, or having as many digits as possible, where no one pays any attention to actuall worlds lore, background story, factions, characters or whatever.

    On a side note, I had found it defeatening how 95% of community didnt knew about Pandarens untill WoW's MoP announcement, for brightest example. (i know this is a little bit off-topic, but i hope i can prove my point with this)

    Main MMO at the moment: Guild Wars 2
    Waiting for: Pathfinder Online

  • nerovipus32nerovipus32 dublinPosts: 2,735Member

    MMORPG'S  used mean to me, "hey im in this awesome world and look there are all these other awesome people in this world with me..lets see whats going on in that group of people over there".  Now it's "i wish that jerk would stop killing those boars i need them to turn in my one thousand quest for that uber anti-social achievement.

  • TalthanysTalthanys Millersville, MDPosts: 458Member

    OP is making me nostalgic, and I agree with him/her.

    Seems that by the time I've carefully crafted my character, everyone else is at the level cap before I even log in.

    There is also the obvious connection between the leveling/end-game impatience and the rise of MOBAs and other lobby-based games. Both are legitimate modes of play, of course, but for a UO vet like myself, I despair seeing the living worlds replaced by waiting room parlours.

    image

  • Creslin321Creslin321 Baltimore, MDPosts: 5,359Member

    Originally posted by nerovipus32

    MMORPG'S  used mean to me, "hey im in this awesome world and look there are all these other awesome people in this world with me..lets see whats going on in that group of people over there".  Now it's "i wish that jerk would stop killing those boars i need them to turn in my one thousand quest for that uber anti-social achievement.

    Well said :).

    Are you team Azeroth, team Tyria, or team Jacob?

  • XAPKenXAPKen Northwest, INPosts: 4,913Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Originally posted by nerovipus32

    Developers need to stop focusing on end game content and appeasing the small percentage of players that run it and instead create more lateral content.

    I agree.

    The entire concept of "end game" is just a side effect of trying to graft a standard SPRPG campaign and leveling system (which must be finite) onto an MMORPG.

     

    Resulting in a game then ends up so top-heavy in terms of population levels, that the main game gets ignored in favor of the level-cap oriented endgame?  Hence the perception that the game actually begins at level-cap and the mentality that the game itself is to be rushed through as a mere tutorial?


    Ken Fisher - Semi retired old fart Network Administrator, now turned Amateur Game Developer.  I don't Forum PVP.  If you feel I've attacked you, it was probably by accident.  Realm Lords 2 on MMORPG.com
  • Zaxx99Zaxx99 Somewhere IN, INPosts: 1,761Member


    Originally posted by MMOPlaya
    Dear Sir -
    I 100%, whole-heartedly, without-a-doubt agree with what you are saying here.  You are the type of player I wish to group with.  Will you be playing SWTOR?  If so, we need to hook up on the same server.  By the way, do you play RIFT?  I have a guild called <Days Of Yore> http://doy.guildlaunch.com which appears to fit right up your alley.  Our motto is "WE DO NOT RUSH".
    PM me!

    Thank you for your kind compliment.

    However I played RIFT during its Beta stages and while it had amazing graphics and all, I did find that game even more mainstream then even World of Warcraft. While I could have fun in a game like RIFT with the right friends/people, I prefer a more old school mmo personally. The only game I currently play is Darkfall which I consider the closest thing we have today to a modern version of Ultima Online. I have had a ton of fun in Darkfall to be honest. :-)


    - Zaxx

    image

  • MendelMendel Marietta, GAPosts: 924Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Originally posted by Fendel84M


    Originally posted by Creslin321


    Originally posted by Mendel

    There's so much in this thread that I'd agree with, I'd double the thread length if I quoted it all.

     

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    ...

    ...

    I agree, I was oversimplifying it.  I think you are right that questing was done with the motivation of reducing the grind as well.  In fact, I remember loving questing when it first game out, I thought it was amazing.

    It wasn't until a while after that I realized what it had done to the game.

     

     

    At first there was a lot more group questing too though. EQ2 in particular was largely group questing. But eventually the players(majority) asked for less group requirements.

    I like questing, but I think its becoming a little too simplified. The quests should be longer, the new 1-60 quests on WoW are actually done nicely with phasing, they have a large story arc and usually end with some kind of boss fight. Its not perfect, but its better.

    Group questing has its own problems though.  Namely it's very difficult to find a group of people that happen to be similar to your level, happen to be at the same point in a quest chain, and just happen to be online and in the same area at the same time.

    As for phasing...if you're going to do this, then why not just make it an SPRPG or CORPG?  That's essentially what phasing is moving towards.  You only share the world with people that you happen to be at the same point in the quest line with.

    IMO, quests should not be tied to the PLAYER.  They should all be tied to the WORLD.  When a quest is complete, it's complete for the whole world.  Sure, it can repeat later, but you won't have any of this nonsense where 10 players are waiting in a line to wipe out the same gnoll camp.

    I totally, totally agree with the idea that quests are tied to the world, not the player.  That's bugged me forever.

    And tieing the quest to the world would work much better for group quests  Much like the communal quests in games like Warhammer, only much more difficult and far less frequent.

    Imagine the following.  One day, the town crier begins announcing a 'traveler advisory' -- an unusually high number of wolf prowling around the local community.  And the wolves come in all varieties of challenge levels -- they threaten not just newbies but veterans -- packs of 2-30 wolves roaming together.  Two game days later, the wolf spawns increase and the town council starts offering a bounty on wolf pelts -- money and XP for wolf pelts of various quality.   Merchants fear for their lives and close all their shops.  Groups of wolves rampage around the town and try to kill the NPC merchants if not opposed.  The third or fourth game day, news comes in from an outlying farm of large numbers of wolves gathering.  The other outlying farms need to be notified.  The wolf leaders need to be opposed.  Once some number of game days pass (or a very high number of wolves are killed by the community), the event ends and life returns to normal.

    An 'event' like this could spawn several world-level quests -- the bounty,  go warn the Barable farmhold, go warn the Murchanson farmhold,  help protect the shepherds as they move their sheep from the high fields into the barns, fight the wolf leader, etc.  Each quest is a once per world.   The concerned councilman will send 1 person to warn each outlying farm.  If they aren't back in a specific time, they will re-issue the quest to someone else.  They NPC guards will want extra wood collected for bonfires, and the local NPCs will want wood themselves.

    But, like I've said many times before.  Ideas are easy; implementing them isn't.

    Logic, my dear, merely enables one to be wrong with great authority.

  • IcewhiteIcewhite Elmhurst, ILPosts: 6,403Member

    I once played a game where average-time-to-cap was measured in years, even decades.

    I once went an entire year without gaining a level, and had a blast doing it.

    And yet I do not see powergaming as inherently evil.  It's a simple taste preference.  They paid their bucks, more power to 'em, enjoying themselves how they like it best.

    Being adaptable is much easier than trying to force other people to follow your rules of gamer ethics.

    Self-pity imprisons us in the walls of our own self-absorption. The whole world shrinks down to the size of our problem, and the more we dwell on it, the smaller we are and the larger the problem seems to grow.

  • Creslin321Creslin321 Baltimore, MDPosts: 5,359Member

    Originally posted by Mendel

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Originally posted by Fendel84M

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Originally posted by Mendel

    There's so much in this thread that I'd agree with, I'd double the thread length if I quoted it all.

     

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    ...

    ...

    ...

    Group questing has its own problems though.  Namely it's very difficult to find a group of people that happen to be similar to your level, happen to be at the same point in a quest chain, and just happen to be online and in the same area at the same time.

    As for phasing...if you're going to do this, then why not just make it an SPRPG or CORPG?  That's essentially what phasing is moving towards.  You only share the world with people that you happen to be at the same point in the quest line with.

    IMO, quests should not be tied to the PLAYER.  They should all be tied to the WORLD.  When a quest is complete, it's complete for the whole world.  Sure, it can repeat later, but you won't have any of this nonsense where 10 players are waiting in a line to wipe out the same gnoll camp.

    I totally, totally agree with the idea that quests are tied to the world, not the player.  That's bugged me forever.

    And tieing the quest to the world would work much better for group quests  Much like the communal quests in games like Warhammer, only much more difficult and far less frequent.

    Imagine the following.  One day, the town crier begins announcing a 'traveler advisory' -- an unusually high number of wolf prowling around the local community.  And the wolves come in all varieties of challenge levels -- they threaten not just newbies but veterans -- packs of 2-30 wolves roaming together.  Two game days later, the wolf spawns increase and the town council starts offering a bounty on wolf pelts -- money and XP for wolf pelts of various quality.   Merchants fear for their lives and close all their shops.  Groups of wolves rampage around the town and try to kill the NPC merchants if not opposed.  The third or fourth game day, news comes in from an outlying farm of large numbers of wolves gathering.  The other outlying farms need to be notified.  The wolf leaders need to be opposed.  Once some number of game days pass (or a very high number of wolves are killed by the community), the event ends and life returns to normal.

    An 'event' like this could spawn several world-level quests -- the bounty,  go warn the Barable farmhold, go warn the Murchanson farmhold,  help protect the shepherds as they move their sheep from the high fields into the barns, fight the wolf leader, etc.  Each quest is a once per world.   The concerned councilman will send 1 person to warn each outlying farm.  If they aren't back in a specific time, they will re-issue the quest to someone else.  They NPC guards will want extra wood collected for bonfires, and the local NPCs will want wood themselves.

    But, like I've said many times before.  Ideas are easy; implementing them isn't.

    Good post, we're obvioulsy on the same wave length :).  What you describe is basically my greatest dream for quests as well.

    But as you say, I think we're probably a while away from getting that.  That said, I do think that GW2 is moving in the right direction with dynamic events.  It's not perfect, but it's progress!

    Are you team Azeroth, team Tyria, or team Jacob?

  • Goatgod76Goatgod76 Stow, OHPosts: 1,214Member

    Originally posted by Icewhite

    Being adaptable is much easier than trying to force other people to follow your rules of gamer ethics.

    Not a rag on you personally, but to the comment in general...it's funny...because almost all players now try and force their style of play on the smaller majority of us who ask for even one MMO that has old school features in them.

    They are selfish too...because they gripe why we'd want something like that that has longer advancement curves and death penalties...and tell us how craptastic it is and how whatever said game we have hopes for being like that better not be or THEY won't play it. Instead of basking in the glory of the dozens of games that cater to their preferred style already and letting some have even one smaller niche MMO that caters to them, they want ALL of them to be like what they want and disregard or flame anyone who wants otherwise and tell us to comform or gtfo.

     

    I know personally if all MMO's to date were long on advancement and had death penalties with meaning, etc, and these basically single-player RPG wanna-be MMO models  we have currently were the minority and a small crowd asked for one MMO to cater to them...I'd give them my blessing. Why? Because I am not greedy or selfish, and have plenty of them to choose from for me to play as it is (If this scenario were the case). But most players now rush through each MMO trying to outdo everyone else and burn themselevs out fast on them...so they are constantly unsatisfied and searching for the next MMO to race through in their futile hopes of being "1st" or the best and most famous (Or pathetic depending on how you look at it). There for, don't care what anyone else wants. Especially if it is something that may take them longer to be top dog in. It's sad.

     

    And even the smaller crowd who want old school type MMO features would still earn a company profit that took the chance. There are PLENTY of players looking for this type of game.  Just not the stupid large profits all companies are blinded into trying to get following WoW's model more than likely...hence the billion cookie cutter MMO's we have today....and failing for the most part might I add.

  • SovrathSovrath Boston Area, MAPosts: 18,453Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    IMO, quests should not be tied to the PLAYER.  They should all be tied to the WORLD.  When a quest is complete, it's complete for the whole world.  Sure, it can repeat later, but you won't have any of this nonsense where 10 players are waiting in a line to wipe out the same gnoll camp.

    I completely agree.

  • MendelMendel Marietta, GAPosts: 924Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Icewhite

    I once played a game where average-time-to-cap was measured in years, even decades.

    I once went an entire year without gaining a level, and had a blast doing it.

    And yet I do not see powergaming as inherently evil.  It's a simple taste preference.  They paid their bucks, more power to 'em, enjoying themselves how they like it best.

    Being adaptable is much easier than trying to force other people to follow your rules of gamer ethics.

    I don't think it is out of line to ask that a game or two cater a bit to the casual, let's relax and enjoy the journey, gamer.  Games cater to the raider, the soloist, crafters, even the PVP crowds.  I don't want to change their game style, like you said, if they enjoy that style, good for them.  But asking for a game to provide different experiences for those that want out-of-the-ordinary game experiences doesn't seem like an extreme thing.

    Logic, my dear, merely enables one to be wrong with great authority.

  • RazeeksterRazeekster Solon, MEPosts: 2,201Member Uncommon

    I just want to point out in todays mmo's there's not really anything fun related for lower leveled players so some try and level as fast as possible to get to the fun content.

    Also like other players have said, once you make a tenth toon you've already seen the "beauty" of the game nine other previous times so you just want to level up to the good stuff!

    Smile

  • DistopiaDistopia Baltimore, MDPosts: 16,905Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Creslin321

    Originally posted by Distopia


    Originally posted by Creslin321

    ...

    The design may contribute but it's not the only factor to consider. If anything the Themepark ideal should have players taking their time reading the stories, learning lore, seeking an understanding of what's going on in that world, etc... Yet the average player's opinion is story isn't important, at least the vocal player's opinions.

    If that's the consensus it's not the Devs fault, as they try and give you a connection to the world. If players truly think the only thing that matters in an MMO is reaching end-game to raid or PVP the fault lies with them, not devs. It seems in a lot of cases this is the underlying factor of why they rush to endgame, as they don't enjoy anything but those two activities.

    Just look at the responses above one guy didn't take the time to read any of the OP, yet rushed to comment as if he had to. Another states he only has a half an hour to play, as well as he's being charged so he rushes through these games. If this is the average player mentality what else could be the result but a bunch of people rushing around? And how does that fall into the devs lap as being at fault pertaining to this issue?

    IF anything older MMO's gave you more of a reason to get to end-game because in a lot of cases you really couldn't do much until you were capped, besides grind out mobs or trash craftables.You weren't building a city or tackling interesting content until you were at the level to be able to do so. New MMO's actually give you multiple activities to take part in on your way up. Yet people still rush through because they are conditioned to think the game starts at end-game.

     

     

    A few things here...

    First, AAA MMORPGs have to make so many quests that each individual quest typically winds up being incredibly droll and repetitive.  I usually just skim them...they just aren't interesting.  And the fact that you're doing a single player quest in a shared world means that your quest will never actually change the world (unless you have phasing) making it even less interesting.

    Second, how is "learning about the world" through quests and such any different than what you could do in a single player game?  I don't think it's different at all, in fact I think it's inferior to a single player game because in an SP game your quest can actually affect the world.

    I just don't think MMORPGs should be about everyone having their own instanced quest line and being the hero of their own little pocket dimension.  As I said in my previous post, the WORLD is what makes an MMORPG unique, but devs seem to rail against this concept.  They try to just "force" a traditional single player quest line into the shared world instead of actually trying to utilize the shared world to make a good game.

    You only replied to one tiny segment of my post though, there's a lot more to what i said than the subject of questing systems.

    For every minute you are angry , you lose 60 seconds of happiness."-Emerson

    It is a sign of a defeated man, to attack at ones character in the face of logic and reason- Me

  • IcewhiteIcewhite Elmhurst, ILPosts: 6,403Member

    Originally posted by Goatgod76

    They are selfish too...because they gripe why we'd want something like that that has longer advancement curves and death penalties...and tell us how craptastic it is

    I would just point out that the old games with those features still exist. :shrug:

    Self-pity imprisons us in the walls of our own self-absorption. The whole world shrinks down to the size of our problem, and the more we dwell on it, the smaller we are and the larger the problem seems to grow.

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