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Have to try it

kirak2009kirak2009 fredericton, NBPosts: 541Member Uncommon

Hey folks;

 

I have been back  lurking aroundmmorpg   for a week  or  so  looking for something to play that will peek my interest  and have heard to many good things about eve  on these boards and in reviews  not to try it.

I am downloading it as i type this and was just wondering if any of you might be able to toss a few newbie tips my way  to help me along( i am pretty experienced in the standard fantasy MMO format,  but have little  to none  in a space setting ( save for a bit of anarchy online  years ago )

any tips, info or guidance would be greatly appreciated

"All expectation leads to suffering" Buhhda

Comments

  • XennithXennith BirminghamPosts: 1,244Member

    Forget everything you know about mmos going in to eve, basic rule of thumb here is that if you are not actively working on a plan to screw someone, somewhere, and take everything they have, you are behind the game.

     

    Never ever undock anything that you cannot afford to lose and comfortably replace, never trust anyone without a very good reason.

  • drbaltazardrbaltazar drummondville, QCPosts: 7,987Member

    and watch the clock because ccp boot everything from protected zone every 24 hour !

  • batolemaeusbatolemaeus SchellhornPosts: 2,061Member

    Disregard drbaltazar, he's posting useless crap as usual.

    The only advice i have for you is to read. Read guides, read warning messages, read mission briefings, read everything the tutorial throws at you.

  • kirak2009kirak2009 fredericton, NBPosts: 541Member Uncommon

    thanks guys,  working away at the tutorials now,  looks like it may be a bit of a learning curve,  but I am liking what i am seeing so far

    "All expectation leads to suffering" Buhhda

  • ZykeZyke Springfield, NJPosts: 335Member
    Originally posted by kirak2009


    thanks guys,  working away at the tutorials now,  looks like it may be a bit of a learning curve,  but I am liking what i am seeing so far

     

    Bit of an understatement about the learning curve, but just remember to take it slow. One thing at a time, pay attention to the tutorial, and have some fun. Don't try to understand the whole game after a few hours, because you can't. It's impossible. People play for months before they really get it, and even EVE vet's of years don't know it all. So start with what you know and take it one step at a time so you don't get overwhelmed, and remember that even the most experienced players were once as confused and unsure as you probably will be.

    Once you finish the tutorials, find out what you like to do. Do some reading and research as necessary, find something that sounds interesting, and work towards it. Finding a corp (guild, but much more really) that has the same goals as you and can help you is very important. Very few people can play EVE solo and enjoy it, it's a team effort and is much more fun and rewarding that way.

    And, as I've said multiple times, just take it one step at a time. Don't get frustrated or take things personally. EVE is harsh world and if you take things personally, you won't last. You WILL have setbacks, without a doubt. Just shrug it off and move on, learn from your mistakes, and you'll be fine.

    Oh, and finally, ask questions. EVE players are generally extremely helpful to new players as long as you approach it the right way. If you ask stupid questions because you didn't do the tutorial or ask things in a rude/obnoxious way people will likely ignore or insult you. Otherwise though you'll likely find most players more than happy to help you out and give advice if they see you're genuinely trying to learn without being an idiot about it.

     

  • MalcanisMalcanis LondonPosts: 3,191Member

    Reposted:

    (1) If you played other MMOs a lot before EVE, try and forget everything you learned in them as much as possible, particularly any expectations you have about other players being limited in how they can interact with you, and even more particularly any ideas about character advancement being the aim of the game rather than just another tool to advance your goals like wealth, assets, game knowledge and friends.

    (2) If any warnings pop up, read them.

    (3) While you will often be told "trust no-one", that's not quite true. What you should do is treat trusting anyone as if it were gambling. What are the odds? What are the stakes? What can I afford to lose? What's in it for him? Scams and ganks are perfectly legal in EVE, even in hi-sec.

    (4) When older players give you advice about fitting ships, for the love of god, at least try following their suggestions.

    (5) Don't listen to the morons who will advise you to train nothing but Learning skills to start with. Yes, doing that is more "efficient" when it comes to accumulating SP, but you're paying to play the game. A good rule of thumb is to spend no more than 50% of your training time on Learnings until you have basics at 4, advanced at 3. Then just leave them alone for a month or two.

    (6) Don't listen to the people who tell you that you shouldn't leave hi-sec "until you're ready" and then tell you you will need x million SP or y ship class or z amount of ISK. You're "ready" to leave hi-sec when you want to leave hi-sec. I know people who left to live in 0.0 on their second day. I went to 0.0 after about 2 months, and I've frequently wished I went earlier. I would however recommend completing all the tutorials before leaving hi-sec.

    (7) Don't listen to the idiot moron griefers who spread the pernicious lie that you need 10/20/40M SP and a Battleship/HAC/Dreadnaught "to be competitive" at PvP. Player skill beats character skill in PVP. The best way for a new player to "compete" at PvP is to get out there and do it. Want to learn to PvP? Join Red vs Blue. They will accept anyone no matter what. They aren't a training corp; they exist purely to provide fun PvP on demand in Hi-sec. You can leave or rejoin at any time. If you get a taste for blood, you can get some great training with Agony Unleashed, who will teach you PVP procedures more formally and thoroughly.

    (8) You don't have to grind missions to make ISK. Missioning is the EVE equivalent of being on welfare - a boring, low-level income for people who can't find a real job. There's a huge and complex economy out there, with a lot of opportunities for a thoughtful, alert player with a fast, cheap ship.

    (9) Do ALL the tutorials.

    (10) Everything I've told you is a cheap dirty lie designed to make you lose your ship to me and quit EVE, because I'm a nasty amoral griefer who doesn't want filthy noobs like you cluttering up my nice, l33t game.

    (11) MAKE FRIENDS. EVE strongly rewards people who group. If you never talk to anyone you'll miss out on a chance to make the game infinitely more rewarding and absorbing. There are plenty of god damb assholes playing EVE, but there are also a large proportion of extremely intelligent people too. Dont assume that because someone plays a peaceful miner that makes them a nice person. Likewise many of the nicest people I know in EVE play ruthless murderers in game.

     

    Welcome to EVE.

    Give me liberty or give me lasers

  • x_rast_xx_rast_x Pittsburg, KSPosts: 745Member

    Been playing three years now.

    Here's a summation of my first month I made back in '08.  I'm the biggest fantasy nut ever but EvE has managed to hold my interest in a manner no other MMO has.

    Also here's a lowsec guide I wrote (back in '08 as well I think, it's still valid though).

    Remember, EvE is a game of wits first and character skills and ISK second.

  • kirak2009kirak2009 fredericton, NBPosts: 541Member Uncommon

    Awesome,  thanks again  for the info  guys,  making  this big climb  up hill  a lot easier :)  loving it so far,  it's  so different  from hittting the serwers  and bashing  rats..  i like it

    "All expectation leads to suffering" Buhhda

  • sadeyxsadeyx leicesterPosts: 1,553Member

    People say 'read this' and 'read that'.. do the tutorials etc...

     

    All good advice of course, but the best advice in my opinion is to chat and ask questions in your starting Corp.  Learning to play Eve is fun in itself if you do it this way.

     

    I made a lot of friends in my starting corp, people who I still know and talk to 4 years later!  We all have taken different paths of course but we stay in touch...   knowing people in Eve is real power, even if like you they are new.

     

    I stayed in my starting corp for a long long time... possibly too long, thing about the starting corp is that most of the players there are trust worthy because they are all in the same situation as you,  some are just alts.. but they dont often have an interest in chatting to new players.

     

    To be honest times when I get bored of eve, I still log on just to chat and to listen to peoples storys, there is no shortage of them!

     

    By all means read up and check out some guides, videos and tutorials..  but the best way is just to ask questions, people LOVE answering questions ;)

  • qazymanqazyman round rock, TXPosts: 1,785Member
    Originally posted by sadeyx


    People say 'read this' and 'read that'.. do the tutorials etc...
     
    All good advice of course, but the best advice in my opinion is to chat and ask questions in your starting Corp.  Learning to play Eve is fun in itself if you do it this way.
     
    I made a lot of friends in my starting corp, people who I still know and talk to 4 years later!  We all have taken different paths of course but we stay in touch...   knowing people in Eve is real power, even if like you they are new.
     

    This is really great advice and it really can make a great deal of difference. People say EVE is cut throat, and you can’t trust anyone, and this is true, but it is also true that most players are just like you. Most players just want to make ISK, blow people up, and have fun. Proving yourself to the right group of players can make you more ISK in a few hours, than months of solo play.

     

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