New PC build advice?

bran7565bran7565 Newberg, ORMember UncommonPosts: 3
Hey guys! So I'm a few weeks here I'm building a new Rig, my budget is 2500 and I'm also interested in getting started on twitch part time, so I was wondering if I'm maybe choosing things that I don't need? I'm also looking to future proof my system at the same time, I haven't built anything in 7 years or so, so I ll list my current Rig and then my new build and you guys can tell me what you think or how I could make better use of my money? thanks so much


Current Rig: 
I7 2600 k at 3.0
16 gigs of dd3 ram 
NVidia 970gtx SC 4gb
Microform atx board 
tower: small and power supply fan and video card fan, one small side vent
I already have all the other stuff, headphones keyboard ect.


New Build in question: 
Processor: AMD ryzen 1800x 
Motherboard: Gigabyte B350
Video card: Titan X 12gb
16gb of DDR4 of cosair vengeance 3200
Logitech C922 pro webcam
windows 10 OEM
Cosair hydro series Liquid cooler
1TB 7200rpm WD Blue
250ssd Samsung Evo
144hz Asus 24inch Monitor (need a second monitor, current is the same model but 60hz)
Chroma custom lighting mouse pad (never had a mousepad before, its time to get one I guess) 
Power supply 850w gold 
Tower: DIYPC Illusion Bl-black duel

I also don't really plan on overclocking much, any advice on streaching my money further or other choices of hardware for better quality and performance would be awesome

Comments

  • TrionicusTrionicus Palm Beach, FLMember UncommonPosts: 496
    Personally I think the Titan X is overkill for under 4k streaming/gaming. An RX 580 or GTX 1070 would be fine.

    Not having a Titan X means a lower watt PSU, 650w+ modular bronze rated is still fine. Honestly, I've never even noticed a difference unless the PSU was an off-brand mess.

    PSU savings + GPU savings = Much larger SSD.

    A 250GB SSD is the bare minimum now, I'd prefer to see you with a 500gb instead, possibly a 1TB SSD and scrap the HDD all-together.

    Which also opens up room for more Memory. 32GB's would be great. Especially if you plan on video editing.

    Mouse pads. I went for the large pads, 20+ inches, plenty of room for my mouse AND keyboard.

    Other than that, everything else would be bells and whistle. Extra LED fans etc... Maybe add a decent mic, a snowball or something.
  • bran7565bran7565 Newberg, ORMember UncommonPosts: 3
    cool guys thanks for the help, a question on the SSDS though, I know they are supposed to be faster, but a lot of the tech videos say that if you install and uninstall games a lot to keep your library down you run the risk of wearing the hard drives out much faster? also what about raiding 2 500gb ssds together? if they fail you lose all info across both right?
  • CleffyCleffy San Diego, CAMember RarePosts: 5,613
    Yup. SSDs have less wear than platters, but they can be ALOT faster. The wear is a bit exagerated. It will take you years before you reach the theoretical limits by constantly filling the SSD every month. For your particular scenario I would advise you to use a 3TB Hitachi Ultrastar if you are planning to store and edit video.  If you are planning to stream and immediately upload, than don't use an HDD at all.
    For me, I use a 1TB m.2 SSD and backup my files online incase my SSD fails. I am not saving a lot of uncompressed video, so the size does not matter too much. Running a game off a fast 3 gb/s SSD makes loading and latency better. For instance, I boot up in about 4 seconds.
    You might not need an 1800x. Most of the Ryzen 7 chips are capable of reaching the same frequency in OC. The 1700x and 1800x in particular come with auto-overclocking if the load is high enough and the thermals allow it. So there is practically no difference between the 2. If you go with the 1700, you would need to manually overclock it to achieve the same performance, but it comes with its own cooler which is decent.
    For Ryzen 7 in particular, you want to only run 2 DIMMs of ram. The platform still has some memory issues even though most dies are now supported. I recommend using GSkill Flare X. They are built for the platform and should be the most compatible.
  • GruntyGrunty TexasMember RarePosts: 8,084
    edited August 4
    RAID 0 = disk striping.  No fault tolerance, one array breaks then all data is lost. Improves performance but with SSDs will probably not be noticeable in a home system
    RAID 1 = disk mirroring.  Each array has all data, one array fails then the other array still works. A 2TB RAID 1 array has 1TB of data storage. Improves fault tolerance but does not improve performance.

    There are other RAID arrays that are rarely used for home use. RAID is not a replacement for regular data backups.

    https://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2370235,00.asp

    Post edited by Grunty on
    She was grimacing. "That does sound like what America's has been trying to do for the last century or two--get rich faster than the parasites could steal it."   The Free Lunch by Spider Robinson
  • LeonardValenciaLeonardValencia Member CommonPosts: 6
    depends on budget mate. if you have a lot of money go for greater specs
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