Graphics card upgrade

giffy689giffy689 ArizonaMember UncommonPosts: 59
Hi was wanting to know what graphics card options there are. 
I have the following right now:
OS:Windows 10
CPU:i7-2600 3.40 GHz
Memory:8.00 GB
Graphics card: Radeon HD 5670

Thank you

«1

Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964
    edited May 12
    What power supply do you have, and what case?  Don't just give the nominal wattage on the power supply, but give the exact brand name and model.  If you don't know, then open up the case and read the label.  For the case, the concerns are airflow and physical size in which you can fit a card.

    The GPU you have is over 7 years old, so even the lowest end GPUs from the newest lineups would be a huge upgrade for you.  Your CPU and memory look like they should be able to handle a much more powerful GPU without immediately bottlenecking it, too.  So you look like a good candidate for a GPU upgrade, assuming your power and cooling can handle it.

    Depending on what you're willing to spend, any of these could be a worthy upgrade for you:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125898
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487263
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125964
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500408
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125869
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814137111

    Higher performance comes with a higher price tag, and also higher power consumption and heat output.  The first card listed is perhaps four times as fast as what you have now, while using about the same power, so it will surely be fine in your current case unless you've got something goofy like an all-in-one or one of those extra thin cases.  The rest will draw more power and put out more heat, which may or may not be fine depending on your case and power supply, which is why I asked.
    Post edited by Quizzical on
  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Valve Corporation Member LegendaryPosts: 9,717

    Quizzical said:

    What power supply do you have, and what case?  Don't just give the nominal wattage on the power supply, but give the exact brand name and model.  If you don't know, then open up the case and read the label.  For the case, the concerns are airflow and physical size in which you can fit a card.

    The GPU you have is over 7 years old, so even the lowest end GPUs from the newest lineups would be a huge upgrade for you.  Your CPU and memory look like they should be able to handle a much more powerful GPU without immediately bottlenecking it, too.  So you look like a good candidate for a GPU upgrade, assuming your power and cooling can handle it.

    Depending on what you're willing to spend, any of these could be a worthy upgrade for you:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125898
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487263
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125964
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500408
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125869
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814137111

    Higher performance comes with a higher price tag, and also higher power consumption and heat output.  The first card listed is perhaps four times as fast as what you have now, while using about the same power, so it will surely be fine in your current case unless you've got something goofy like an all-in-one or one of those extra thin cases.  The rest will draw more power and put out more heat, which may or may not be fine depending on your case and power supply, which is why I asked.


    Will his CPU bottleneck the 1070 at all?
    My wife's computer has the same CPU and I was thinking of getting the 1070 for her for her gaming and photoshop work

    거북이는 목을 내밀 때 안 움직입니다












  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964




    Quizzical said:


    What power supply do you have, and what case?  Don't just give the nominal wattage on the power supply, but give the exact brand name and model.  If you don't know, then open up the case and read the label.  For the case, the concerns are airflow and physical size in which you can fit a card.

    The GPU you have is over 7 years old, so even the lowest end GPUs from the newest lineups would be a huge upgrade for you.  Your CPU and memory look like they should be able to handle a much more powerful GPU without immediately bottlenecking it, too.  So you look like a good candidate for a GPU upgrade, assuming your power and cooling can handle it.

    Depending on what you're willing to spend, any of these could be a worthy upgrade for you:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125898
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487263
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125964
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500408
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125869
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814137111

    Higher performance comes with a higher price tag, and also higher power consumption and heat output.  The first card listed is perhaps four times as fast as what you have now, while using about the same power, so it will surely be fine in your current case unless you've got something goofy like an all-in-one or one of those extra thin cases.  The rest will draw more power and put out more heat, which may or may not be fine depending on your case and power supply, which is why I asked.




    Will his CPU bottleneck the 1070 at all?
    My wife's computer has the same CPU and I was thinking of getting the 1070 for her for her gaming and photoshop work


    What video card does she have now?

    There's always something that is the bottleneck, whether it's the CPU, GPU, memory, storage, or whatever.  Otherwise, you'd have infinite performance.  But a Core i7-2600 was quite a capable CPU and is still decent even today, six years after launch.
  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Valve Corporation Member LegendaryPosts: 9,717

    Quizzical said:








    Quizzical said:



    What power supply do you have, and what case?  Don't just give the nominal wattage on the power supply, but give the exact brand name and model.  If you don't know, then open up the case and read the label.  For the case, the concerns are airflow and physical size in which you can fit a card.

    The GPU you have is over 7 years old, so even the lowest end GPUs from the newest lineups would be a huge upgrade for you.  Your CPU and memory look like they should be able to handle a much more powerful GPU without immediately bottlenecking it, too.  So you look like a good candidate for a GPU upgrade, assuming your power and cooling can handle it.

    Depending on what you're willing to spend, any of these could be a worthy upgrade for you:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125898
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487263
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125964
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500408
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125869
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814137111

    Higher performance comes with a higher price tag, and also higher power consumption and heat output.  The first card listed is perhaps four times as fast as what you have now, while using about the same power, so it will surely be fine in your current case unless you've got something goofy like an all-in-one or one of those extra thin cases.  The rest will draw more power and put out more heat, which may or may not be fine depending on your case and power supply, which is why I asked.






    Will his CPU bottleneck the 1070 at all?
    My wife's computer has the same CPU and I was thinking of getting the 1070 for her for her gaming and photoshop work




    What video card does she have now?

    There's always something that is the bottleneck, whether it's the CPU, GPU, memory, storage, or whatever.  Otherwise, you'd have infinite performance.  But a Core i7-2600 was quite a capable CPU and is still decent even today, six years after launch.


    She has an R9 380 4 gig right now

    거북이는 목을 내밀 때 안 움직입니다












  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964




    Quizzical said:












    Quizzical said:




    What power supply do you have, and what case?  Don't just give the nominal wattage on the power supply, but give the exact brand name and model.  If you don't know, then open up the case and read the label.  For the case, the concerns are airflow and physical size in which you can fit a card.

    The GPU you have is over 7 years old, so even the lowest end GPUs from the newest lineups would be a huge upgrade for you.  Your CPU and memory look like they should be able to handle a much more powerful GPU without immediately bottlenecking it, too.  So you look like a good candidate for a GPU upgrade, assuming your power and cooling can handle it.

    Depending on what you're willing to spend, any of these could be a worthy upgrade for you:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125898
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487263
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125964
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500408
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125869
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814137111

    Higher performance comes with a higher price tag, and also higher power consumption and heat output.  The first card listed is perhaps four times as fast as what you have now, while using about the same power, so it will surely be fine in your current case unless you've got something goofy like an all-in-one or one of those extra thin cases.  The rest will draw more power and put out more heat, which may or may not be fine depending on your case and power supply, which is why I asked.








    Will his CPU bottleneck the 1070 at all?
    My wife's computer has the same CPU and I was thinking of getting the 1070 for her for her gaming and photoshop work






    What video card does she have now?

    There's always something that is the bottleneck, whether it's the CPU, GPU, memory, storage, or whatever.  Otherwise, you'd have infinite performance.  But a Core i7-2600 was quite a capable CPU and is still decent even today, six years after launch.




    She has an R9 380 4 gig right now


    That is, itself, a decently capable card.  An upgrade to a GTX 1070 would about double the current performance.  Are you having performance problems with the current rig, and certain that the GPU is the issue?  Your current GPU is perhaps 8 times as fast as that of the original poster, which makes it less obvious that there's a lot to be gained from an upgrade.
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard La BarreMember EpicPosts: 6,288
    For the OP, a RX 580 would be a nice upgrade too if he can't afford the more expensive 1070.
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 7700k (4.80ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z270X-UltraGaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston SV300 480gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 4K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Pioneer VSX-322 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964


    For the OP, a RX 580 would be a nice upgrade too if he can't afford the more expensive 1070.


    That's definitely an upgrade, but I generally recommend at least doubling your performance if you're going to upgrade a GPU, and an RX 580 doesn't get you there.
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard La BarreMember EpicPosts: 6,288
    edited May 12




    Quizzical said:














    For the OP, a RX 580 would be a nice upgrade too if he can't afford the more expensive 1070.










    That's definitely an upgrade, but I generally recommend at least doubling your performance if you're going to upgrade a GPU, and an RX 580 doesn't get you there.








    As I said, if he can't afford the 1070, since that's a $100 difference.
    Money can be a problem for many people ;)

    And FFS, he has a 5670... that's not even a gaming card, and how many generations behind ? I'm pretty sure the RX580 would double his performance too.

    PS: I agree with you about the "double" thing. That's why I'm waiting for Vega, my only alternative so far being the 1080ti.
    Post edited by Jean-Luc_Picard on
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 7700k (4.80ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z270X-UltraGaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston SV300 480gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 4K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Pioneer VSX-322 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.
  • VrikaVrika FinlandMember RarePosts: 4,024

    Quizzical said:





    For the OP, a RX 580 would be a nice upgrade too if he can't afford the more expensive 1070.




    That's definitely an upgrade, but I generally recommend at least doubling your performance if you're going to upgrade a GPU, and an RX 580 doesn't get you there.


    Jean-Luc_Picard was talking about the OP's upgrade, not about Blueturtle's upgrade.
     
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964
    giffy689 said:
    Good job collecting the data.  You might be surprised how many people start a thread like this and then reply with something to the effect of, "thanks for the help, I bought something random that no one recommended."

    On the case and power supply, that's more or less what I was afraid of.  As best as I can tell, you've only got one case fan.  Here's the best picture of your power supply that I could find:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/OEM-Power-Supply-Unit-For-Dell-XPS-8300-8500-Mini-Tower-460W-AC460AD-00-WY7XX-/262071832141?hash=item3d04b2ce4d:g:pDcAAOSwsB9WCkxa

    I knew that Dell likes to use dubious parts, but they've found a creative new way to do something stupid that I had never seen before:  a power supply with a +12 V rail rated at 8 A.  I'm not sure what they plug into it, but I hope it doesn't include the CPU, motherboard, or PCI Express connectors, as any of those would run perilously close to pushing it out of spec.

    And, of course, it has the classic problem of a "460 W" power supply that claims to only be able to handle 385 W on the +12 V rails.  I'd bet on it dying if you tried to pull 460 W from it--and if you tried that, you'd be lucky if it didn't kill any other hardware in the process.  The problem with such fake specs is that you really don't know how much it can handle.

    For case airflow, only one case fan isn't a good idea for a high-powered gaming rig.  They figured that you wouldn't build a high-powered gaming rig with it.  An external exhaust GPU would mostly fix that problem, but that greatly limits your selection.

    I'd eyeball that case as giving you about 9" of GPU clearance, assuming it's a Micro ATX motherboard.  The cloudfront picture you linked was very helpful.  You may or may not be able to add another inch or so by removing trays, but beyond that, you'd have to cut through metal.  Higher end, longer video cards won't physically fit in your case.

    The first video card I linked above will definitely be fine:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125898

    Heat and power are comparable to what you have now, and it's only about 7.5" long.  It's about 4 times as fast as what you have now, so it's clearly a big upgrade.  If you were hoping to keep the price tag under $100, I'd buy it and call it a day.  I wouldn't recommend "upgrading" to anything slower than that.

    If you were hoping to get something faster than that, the next model up would probably also be fine:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487263

    There, you're looking at more heat and higher power consumption, so that your current rig can handle it just fine doesn't necessarily mean that it would still work fine if adding that video card.  It's about twice as fast as the Radeon RX 460, and also about twice as expensive.

    I wouldn't try going higher end than that on your case and power supply.  It's possible to replace the power supply, but then you need to ask how much money do you really want to sink into upgrading a computer that is already 6 years old.  Gaming-oriented cases nearly always come with more case fans, and often come with vents and fan mounts where you can add extra case fans for more airflow if you need it, but Dell doesn't do that.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964
    Ah, I missed where you said a $350 budget.  There's a difference between "could spend if I had to but would rather spend less" and "I'm going to spend this much and want to spend it as wisely as I can".  So it depends on how you feel about actually spending $350 as opposed to substantially less.

    If you don't already have a good SSD, I'd get one.  And if you bought the computer from Dell, you probably don't.  SSDs are massively faster than hard drives, and you're probably waiting on your hard drive a lot more often than you realize.  For example:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226854

    Or if you need more capacity:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820250079

    Ideally, you do a clean install of Windows on the SSD, and then install your main programs there.  With an OEM system from Dell that likely came with Windows 7 and later used the free upgrade to 10, I'm not sure how practical that would be in your case.  Depending on how full your hard drive is, you might be able to just clone it to an SSD.

    You normally want to put the OS and your main programs on the SSD, and if you have lots of bulk data, that can go on a separate hard drive--such as the one you already have.  Check how much space you're using on your current hard drive, as if it's under 200 GB, you can just get an SSD and clone your hard drive.  If you're using 2 TB, what to do about an SSD is more complicated.

    When checking on hard drive usage, be aware that Windows tends to be massively wasteful by making backups of backups of backups for you--and all on the same drive so that you lose them all if the drive fails, anyway.  You can open Windows Explorer, right click on the C: drive (assuming you didn't do anything fancy in partitioning it), click Properties, and see how much space Windows thinks you're using.

    You can also select all of the folders on your C: drive at once, then right click on them, click Properties, wait a while, and eventually get how much all of your real files take.  That will exclude what Windows is using for backups.
  • giffy689giffy689 ArizonaMember UncommonPosts: 59
    Thanks for the info. I think I will just hold off and get a custom rig
    Torval
  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 13,412
    edited May 13
    giffy689 said:
    Thanks for the info. I think I will just hold off and get a custom rig
    I think saving up and building a new rig is your best way forward. Unless a hardware manufacturer makes the sub-components they are rarely decent at building a whole system. I've seen a couple interesting systems and bare bones by Corsair and ASUS, but not much outside of that.
    Post edited by Torval on
    Centuries ago, in primitive times, before the dawn of civilization, there were things that would be inconceivable to us today; such things as poverty, disease, violence, senility, and love.
  • ianicusianicus Calgary, ABMember UncommonPosts: 589
    you could probably squeeze another 2 years plus out of that system with an rx480 if u can still find one, they are going cheap from some places right now due to rx580 launch
    "Well let me just quote the late-great Colonel Sanders, who said…’I’m too drunk to taste this chicken." - Ricky Bobby
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964
    giffy689 said:
    Thanks for the info. I think I will just hold off and get a custom rig
    That's completely reasonable, but if that's the route you want to go, I'd like to recommend either building your own or buying from a site that lets you choose the exact parts.  That way, you won't end up with the limited upgrade capability of your current rig.  If you don't know what parts to get, you can ask for help.

    Some sites let you have a few cosmetic choices but not actually very many things that matter.  If a site lets you pick the exact brand name and model of your power supply (not just the nominal wattage!), they're probably letting you pick everything that matters.

    But don't just buy something random and then say, "I just bought this; is it any good?"  You seem smart enough to avoid that, but many people aren't.
    xyzercrimegiffy689blueturtle13
  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 13,412
    This is a fun site to play with parts builds and see what your budget can build. The prices there aren't always exactly accurate, so make sure to check around, but it's pretty good at getting you in the ballpark.

    https://pcpartpicker.com/
    blueturtle13
    Centuries ago, in primitive times, before the dawn of civilization, there were things that would be inconceivable to us today; such things as poverty, disease, violence, senility, and love.
  • giffy689giffy689 ArizonaMember UncommonPosts: 59
    Quizzical said:
    giffy689 said:
    Thanks for the info. I think I will just hold off and get a custom rig
    That's completely reasonable, but if that's the route you want to go, I'd like to recommend either building your own or buying from a site that lets you choose the exact parts.  That way, you won't end up with the limited upgrade capability of your current rig.  If you don't know what parts to get, you can ask for help.

    Some sites let you have a few cosmetic choices but not actually very many things that matter.  If a site lets you pick the exact brand name and model of your power supply (not just the nominal wattage!), they're probably letting you pick everything that matters.

    But don't just buy something random and then say, "I just bought this; is it any good?"  You seem smart enough to avoid that, but many people aren't.
    Can you help me with choosing parts for a gaming rig please? I have a $800-$1200 range. Also do you know of a pick your parts site by chance?
                                                                         Thank you
  • jitter77jitter77 Greensburg, PAMember UncommonPosts: 180
    Another thing if you have a brand name PC like HP, Dell, etc etc..... Make sure the card is compatible with the motherboard.  I went through a nightmare to upgrade my card.  I have an Hp h8-1020 w/ an i7 and all specs should have handled an R9 270x with no problem.  However once the card was in I had a plain black screen.  The PC would not even post.  After doing some research online other people were having the same problem trying to upgrade both to AMD and NV cards (the system had a AMD card already).  I had also previously already upgraded the power supply.

    Anyways to make a long story short I bought a new motherboard. 
    My CPU heatsink would not fit on the new motherboard
    Had to buy a new heatsink....
    Installed the heatsink / card feeling all good cant hook up the SATA cables because the new card takes up more space and the cable run behind it
    Bought 90 degree SATA cables that I could fit behind card
    Get ready to hook everything else up and oh no! HP uses a custom MB header so I can not hook up things to the power switch, power certain USB ports, card reader, etc etc.....
    For a couple days I was starting the PC with a screwdriver by shorting out 2 pins on the MB. 
    I went to a local PC shop and they gave me a header with a power switch.

    I had to spend almost the same amount in parts as the GPU itself cost.
    Before you just buy a card and think you can slap it in do some research.
    blueturtle13
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,964
    giffy689 said:
    Quizzical said:
    giffy689 said:
    Thanks for the info. I think I will just hold off and get a custom rig
    That's completely reasonable, but if that's the route you want to go, I'd like to recommend either building your own or buying from a site that lets you choose the exact parts.  That way, you won't end up with the limited upgrade capability of your current rig.  If you don't know what parts to get, you can ask for help.

    Some sites let you have a few cosmetic choices but not actually very many things that matter.  If a site lets you pick the exact brand name and model of your power supply (not just the nominal wattage!), they're probably letting you pick everything that matters.

    But don't just buy something random and then say, "I just bought this; is it any good?"  You seem smart enough to avoid that, but many people aren't.
    Can you help me with choosing parts for a gaming rig please? I have a $800-$1200 range. Also do you know of a pick your parts site by chance?
                                                                         Thank you
    Are you willing and able to assemble parts yourself if you have suitable parts in your possession, or do you need someone else to do it for you?  You can assume that the latter will eat up about 20% of your budget.

    The only tool that you need to assemble a computer from parts is a screwdriver, and perhaps scissors to open boxes.  So you don't have to do more complicated things.  Knowing how to assemble, upgrade, and repair a computer is also a handy skill to have.  But if you're too scared, have physical impairments, or have more money and less time than you're letting on, buying off a site that will assemble it for you is also an option.
    GdemamiJean-Luc_Picard
  • VrikaVrika FinlandMember RarePosts: 4,024
    edited May 14


    giffy689 said:
    Can you help me with choosing parts for a gaming rig please? I have a $800-$1200 range. Also do you know of a pick your parts site by chance?
                                                                         Thank you
    Here's one build:

    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/JtvT7h
    CPU Cooler for the build: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835856006

    That build does not include operating system. If you need to buy new OS, add $100 to the price.

    That build only includes 480GB SSD. If you need more storage than that, there are 2TB hard disks available at around $75.

    The GPU on that build is picked because it was on sale and $40 cheaper than any other GTX 1070. Once the sale is over (5 days from now on NewEgg) I wouldn't pick that one. Also that GPU is quite noisy while under heavy load, if you care about how much noise your computer generates while gaming then that's not a good option.


    EDIT: Changed the build a little because I had forgotten to check memory compatibility /EDIT
    Post edited by Vrika on
     
  • giffy689giffy689 ArizonaMember UncommonPosts: 59
    Vrika said:


    giffy689 said:
    Can you help me with choosing parts for a gaming rig please? I have a $800-$1200 range. Also do you know of a pick your parts site by chance?
                                                                         Thank you
    Here's one build:

    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/JtvT7h
    CPU Cooler for the build: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835856006

    That build does not include operating system. If you need to buy new OS, add $100 to the price.

    That build only includes 480GB SSD. If you need more storage than that, there are 2TB hard disks available at around $75.

    The GPU on that build is picked because it was on sale and $40 cheaper than any other GTX 1070. Once the sale is over (5 days from now on NewEgg) I wouldn't pick that one. Also that GPU is quite noisy while under heavy load, if you care about how much noise your computer generates while gaming then that's not a good option.


    EDIT: Changed the build a little because I had forgotten to check memory compatibility What would be a quieter card and does the site offer assembly?
  • giffy689giffy689 ArizonaMember UncommonPosts: 59
    What would be a quieter card than the GTX 1070? Also does pcpartpicker offer assembly service?
  • VrikaVrika FinlandMember RarePosts: 4,024
    edited May 14
    giffy689 said:
    What would be a quieter card than the GTX 1070? Also does pcpartpicker offer assembly service?
    I just meant that it's not a particularly quiet GTX 1070 model. If you want a quiet model of GTX 1070, something like EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 SC would be good, but it's also more expensive.

    https://uk.hardware.info/reviews/6979/11/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1070-mini-itx-review-cute-1070-noise-levels-and-temperatures

    PCPartPicker doesn't offer any assembly service.
    Post edited by Vrika on
     
  • wandericawanderica clayton, NCMember UncommonPosts: 258
    giffy689 said:
    What would be a quieter card than the GTX 1070? Also does pcpartpicker offer assembly service?
    That Zotac listed should be a reasonably quiet card.  Most aftermarket cards are, but not all.  https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487326&cm_re=1070_FE-_-14-487-326-_-Product is an example of what is referred to as a blower style card.  They tend to be noisier than open air cards and, usually, a bit hotter on temperatures.  The tradeoff is that they can be used in restricted airflow situations, like adding to your Dell case, for example.


    The quietest 1070 you could buy is a water cooled card, either through setting up a custom loop (system builders can do this if you choose, but it does require some maintenance on the user end) or buy purchasing something like the EVGA 1070 Hybrid (https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487281&cm_re=1070_hybrid-_-14-487-281-_-Product).  In the end though, I've found most aftermarket cards such as MSI's Gaming X cards to offer almost silent cooling without the added cost and hassle of watercooling.  Absolute silence can only be found in passively cooled cards, but the 1070 doesn't come in a passively cooled configuration as far as I know.  The 1050 Ti, I think, is the only current generation GPU that comes passively cooled, but it is far below a GTX 1070 in performance.

    PCPartspicker does not offer assembly, but there are some online system builders out there.  Origin PC is one.  These guys used to be Alienware before Dell bought it.  Another is Falcon Northwest and Cyberpower PC.  My personal recommendation for assembly, though, is to find a shop locally and just buy from them.  They usually guarantee their work, and you most likely won't get the markup for flashy lights and decals that you get from the online guys.


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