is this CPU even worth getting at the price

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Comments

  • someforumguysomeforumguy HomeMember UncommonPosts: 3,753
    I would never post a question about hardware on these forums lol. I know there are people who know a lot about hardware here, but at the same time you have to wade through countless of almost fanbased comments (all the tripe with their anecdotal evidence why <insert brand> is utter shit or awesome).

    - Ignore all posts claiming shit because of some anecdote.
    - Ignore all posts from people who clearly didn't read about the requirements you have for your new pc.
    - Ignore all posts from people who can't compare sensibly (some intel cpu vs amd cpu with huge price difference or stuff like that).

    - Ignore this post too.

    I wonder how many posts will be left. Someone count please. And OP good luck with your purchase. May the gods protect your brain from getting hurt by these forums.
  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    Yeah I saw that roadmap - interesting to note that Kaby Lake X is limited to 4/8 (basically a 7700 w/o the IGP). Skylake will get up to a 12/24 core model (up from Broadwells' current 10/20). 

    That being said, apart from retailer inventory reduction, chipmakers very rarely discount existing hardware when their new generation comes out - particularly Intel, who tends to actually raise prices as chips move End-Of-Life.

    I would expect X299 to be similar to the current X99 -- quad channel DDR4, more PCI lanes than H/B/Z series, maybe more robust RAID/M.2 options, but all in all not a lot past that. Exciting if your working on multi-SLI, or have some particular need for a lot of RAM bandwidth, not so much if your not.
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard La BarreMember EpicPosts: 6,158


    I would never post a question about hardware on these forums lol. I know there are people who know a lot about hardware here, but at the same time you have to wade through countless of almost fanbased comments (all the tripe with their anecdotal evidence why <insert brand> is utter shit or awesome).

    - Ignore all posts claiming shit because of some anecdote.
    - Ignore all posts from people who clearly didn't read about the requirements you have for your new pc.
    - Ignore all posts from people who can't compare sensibly (some intel cpu vs amd cpu with huge price difference or stuff like that).

    - Ignore this post too.

    I wonder how many posts will be left. Someone count please. And OP good luck with your purchase. May the gods protect your brain from getting hurt by these forums.


    Welcome to the Internet, where even the most ignorant and stupid people can pretend being experts ;)
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 7700k (4.80ghz) - GPU: ASUS R9 290x-DC2 OC 4Gb DDR5 (1150 mhz core) - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z270X-UltraGaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston SV300 480gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - Soundcard: Pioneer VSX-322 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.
  • RobsolfRobsolf Grand Rapids, MIMember UncommonPosts: 4,369
    For me, the choice of CPU has really been more about buying time, more than performance.  Not just in the immediate, "X loads in 20 seconds, compared to 23 seconds with the other CPU", but in the time you'll have before you have to upgrade.

    I've seen a few arguments about just buying a previous generation CPU for much cheaper, and the point is probably true that you won't see much of a difference between those and a 7700 on a 60hz lcd... -now.  But you're going to be short that time in generations in terms of system viability.  If you buy a 1 year old CPU design, you're gonna be short 1 year, more or less, in system usefulness.  But there's still a perfectly good argument for it.

    Up until this time when I went with the 7700, that was pretty much my system building strategy.  I'd buy a good series $100-ish dollar CPU, buy as future proof a mobo as I could afford, and replace the cpu when the system either got too slow or after the socket was  retired.  If the latter, I'd buy the best compatible CPU, at a fraction of the cost of when it was the newest gen.  As a result, I'd end up with a better, faster system for about the same money as if I bought the latest gen in the first place.

    Personally, I found that AMD was best for this.  They maintained socket compatibility far longer than Intel did, and this may still be the case, today.

    Now, the reason I went with the 7700 this time because I was tired of some of the quirky crap that I got from the AMD from day one.  Games like LotRO and Marvel Heroes would hitch terribly, something that neither of my Intel laptops did despite having weaker video and slower HD's.  Other games would just inexplicably go from 60 FPS to a slideshow instantly in certain areas, again, an issue when it was 0 years old or 8 years old.  A few weeks now with the 7700 has yielded 0 surprises like this, and that makes me happy.
  • OzmodanOzmodan Hilliard, OHMember RarePosts: 8,423




    Ozmodan said:


    Well here is another big boost for Ryzen, seems the I7 7700 has some nasty issues....

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/05/04/intel_i77700_heat_spike_problems/




    Mine disagrees, but then it's a "K" version...


    Come by my place sometime, I have a box of burnt out processors that I have had to replace. 
  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,848

    Ozmodan said:








    Ozmodan said:



    Well here is another big boost for Ryzen, seems the I7 7700 has some nasty issues....

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/05/04/intel_i77700_heat_spike_problems/






    Mine disagrees, but then it's a "K" version...




    Come by my place sometime, I have a box of burnt out processors that I have had to replace. 


    And I'm going to assume also some empty tanks of liquid nitrogen.

    How dangerous overclocking is depends tremendously on how far you overclock and how good of other components the system has to be able to handle the heavier load.  If you start by adding 0.4 V before you touch the clock speed, that will fry a lot more things than if you just go for the maximum clock speed that you can get at the stock voltage.
  • HrimnirHrimnir Member RarePosts: 2,346

    Yep, if he has a box of burnt out CPU's he is either A. Doing something horribly wrong, or B. One of those guys who is competing to get the highest possible OC.

    I've been OC'ing since the days of Pentium 2's and I've literally never once fried a chip.  I've had chips with 15-20% overclocks that I ran for 6 years with 0 issues.

    "The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."

    - Friedrich Nietzsche

  • CleffyCleffy San Diego, CAMember RarePosts: 5,526
    edited May 12
    I have seen weird operation in CPUs that have been overclocked for several years. Not sure if it was caused by the thermal paste degrading, typical aging, overclock, voltage surges due to appliances run on the same circuit, or having it working at 100% load for several days rendering CG animations. My guess is the voltage fluctuations.

    The noted problem with the 7700K is the cheap thermal compound where de-lidding helps. On the other hand, you can't get a Ryzen 7 over 4.1 ghz reliably. May change in the future as engineer samples are floating around at 4.7 ghz. However, I have my doubts on if it is a driver fix.
    Post edited by Cleffy on
  • dreamsfadedreamsfade Columbia, MOMember UncommonPosts: 327
    edited May 12




    So im going to try putting together a new PC for streaming and gaming primarily (although surfing and youtube is also whats going to be done). I figure I'll start the decision making with the CPU, then MB, then RAM etc...

    I'm looking at http://www.ncix.com/detail/intel-core-i7-7700k-processor-8m-a8-137588.htm?promoid=1500

    INTEL CORE I7-7700K Processor 8M Cache 4 Cores 4.2GHZ FC-LGA14C Retail Box Kaby Lake

    I read up and this appears to be a higher end Kaby lake series. It is roughly $450 CAD (I cant find big sales for it).

    Now I wikipedia CPU and a new series is set to release late 2017. I don't feel like my PC can wait that long, but is it worth getting this for 450$ with a new series sort of around the corner? I'm not an early adapter so I would most likely wait out the beginning anyways when the new series is released. My concern is if I would be overpaying at that price. 

    I'm currently using Intel Core i7 CPU 950  @ 3.07GHz, 3060 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 8 Logical Processor(s)

    Any advice or opinions is very appreciated


    From what I've heard its a very good processor. If you do get it make sure to get a 200 series motherboard for it to take advantage of the new tech in the 7700k
    Post edited by dreamsfade on

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  • CleffyCleffy San Diego, CAMember RarePosts: 5,526
    edited May 12
    It's the same price on Amazon. The price listed at NCIX is in CAD.
    Post edited by Cleffy on
  • OzmodanOzmodan Hilliard, OHMember RarePosts: 8,423

    Quizzical said:

    Ozmodan said:
    Ozmodan said:
    Well here is another big boost for Ryzen, seems the I7 7700 has some nasty issues....

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/05/04/intel_i77700_heat_spike_problems/
    Mine disagrees, but then it's a "K" version...
    Come by my place sometime, I have a box of burnt out processors that I have had to replace. 
    And I'm going to assume also some empty tanks of liquid nitrogen.

    How dangerous overclocking is depends tremendously on how far you overclock and how good of other components the system has to be able to handle the heavier load.  If you start by adding 0.4 V before you touch the clock speed, that will fry a lot more things than if you just go for the maximum clock speed that you can get at the stock voltage.


    I just build systems for people, I do not overclock them.  What they do after I build the system is up to the owner.  There is nothing wrong with minor overclocking, the problem is that people always seem to OC as high as they can go.  If you are running your I7-7700k at 4.8 it will see my blown cpu box sooner than later.
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard La BarreMember EpicPosts: 6,158
    edited May 12



    Ozmodan said:



    If you are running your I7-7700k at 4.8 it will see my blown cpu box sooner than later.






    Want to bet I won't? I will swap my still 100% working 7700k for the 8700k (or whatever comes next) like I always do.
    I've been overclocking PCs for ages and never had a single fried CPU, be it Intel or AMD.
    But then I know what I'm doing, I don't increase voltage like a retard and I have proper cooling.
    Post edited by Jean-Luc_Picard on
    Ridelynn
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 7700k (4.80ghz) - GPU: ASUS R9 290x-DC2 OC 4Gb DDR5 (1150 mhz core) - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z270X-UltraGaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston SV300 480gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - Soundcard: Pioneer VSX-322 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.
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