If you are looking for a desktop...

2»

Comments

  • GladDogGladDog Pottstown, PAMember RarePosts: 845


    Just too late for me.  Oh well, better luck next deal....


    Here is another good deal, although it is not as powerful as the one I got, it is a good platform to build on.

    https://flash.newegg.com/Product/9SIA6BM5754157?utm_source=NFEmail041117&utm_medium=index&utm_campaign=SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157&cm_mmc=EMC-NFEmail041117-_-SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157-_-NA-_-9SIA6BM5754157

    A few caveats;
    *it is using an H110 motherboard, so I am unsure if it will support a 7th gen Intel CPU.  It likely only has 2 memory slots, so if you want to upgrade your RAM the two installed chips will be replaced, not added to.
    *I searched, and the PSU is 350W, not enough if you add a video card with a power plug.

    Someone could buy this and use it as a passable gaming unit until they could afford a 500W+ PSU and a one-plug video card like a GTX1060 or an RX-480.  Or they could probably get away with the included PSU if they used a no-plug vid, like a GTX1050 or an RX-460.  Personally I would upgrade the PSU to at least 600W and add a 1060 or a 480.  The 600W would mean there was enough power for a better vid later.


    The world is going to the dogs, which is just how I planned it!


  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 18,152

    GladDog said:





    Just too late for me.  Oh well, better luck next deal....




    Here is another good deal, although it is not as powerful as the one I got, it is a good platform to build on.

    https://flash.newegg.com/Product/9SIA6BM5754157?utm_source=NFEmail041117&utm_medium=index&utm_campaign=SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157&cm_mmc=EMC-NFEmail041117-_-SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157-_-NA-_-9SIA6BM5754157

    A few caveats;
    *it is using an H110 motherboard, so I am unsure if it will support a 7th gen Intel CPU.  It likely only has 2 memory slots, so if you want to upgrade your RAM the two installed chips will be replaced, not added to.
    *I searched, and the PSU is 350W, not enough if you add a video card with a power plug.

    Someone could buy this and use it as a passable gaming unit until they could afford a 500W+ PSU and a one-plug video card like a GTX1060 or an RX-480.  Or they could probably get away with the included PSU if they used a no-plug vid, like a GTX1050 or an RX-460.  Personally I would upgrade the PSU to at least 600W and add a 1060 or a 480.  The 600W would mean there was enough power for a better vid later.


    How do you know that it's a good deal?  What's in it?  The only thing that you know is in it is a CPU that you know that you don't want.  If the plan is to buy that and upgrade it to a respectable $800 gaming desktop, it's likely that you'd pay $700+ to buy the upgrade components.
  • GladDogGladDog Pottstown, PAMember RarePosts: 845

    Quizzical said:



    GladDog said:








    Just too late for me.  Oh well, better luck next deal....






    Here is another good deal, although it is not as powerful as the one I got, it is a good platform to build on.

    https://flash.newegg.com/Product/9SIA6BM5754157?utm_source=NFEmail041117&utm_medium=index&utm_campaign=SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157&cm_mmc=EMC-NFEmail041117-_-SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157-_-NA-_-9SIA6BM5754157

    A few caveats;
    *it is using an H110 motherboard, so I am unsure if it will support a 7th gen Intel CPU.  It likely only has 2 memory slots, so if you want to upgrade your RAM the two installed chips will be replaced, not added to.
    *I searched, and the PSU is 350W, not enough if you add a video card with a power plug.

    Someone could buy this and use it as a passable gaming unit until they could afford a 500W+ PSU and a one-plug video card like a GTX1060 or an RX-480.  Or they could probably get away with the included PSU if they used a no-plug vid, like a GTX1050 or an RX-460.  Personally I would upgrade the PSU to at least 600W and add a 1060 or a 480.  The 600W would mean there was enough power for a better vid later.




    How do you know that it's a good deal?  What's in it?  The only thing that you know is in it is a CPU that you know that you don't want.  If the plan is to buy that and upgrade it to a respectable $800 gaming desktop, it's likely that you'd pay $700+ to buy the upgrade components.

    I thought this was a quad core and it is not, it is a dual core, probably not a great choice for going into the future with gaming.  So never mind...


    The world is going to the dogs, which is just how I planned it!


  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 18,152

    GladDog said:



    Quizzical said:





    GladDog said:











    Just too late for me.  Oh well, better luck next deal....








    Here is another good deal, although it is not as powerful as the one I got, it is a good platform to build on.

    https://flash.newegg.com/Product/9SIA6BM5754157?utm_source=NFEmail041117&utm_medium=index&utm_campaign=SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157&cm_mmc=EMC-NFEmail041117-_-SaleBanner_B3D_9SIA6BM5754157-_-NA-_-9SIA6BM5754157

    A few caveats;
    *it is using an H110 motherboard, so I am unsure if it will support a 7th gen Intel CPU.  It likely only has 2 memory slots, so if you want to upgrade your RAM the two installed chips will be replaced, not added to.
    *I searched, and the PSU is 350W, not enough if you add a video card with a power plug.

    Someone could buy this and use it as a passable gaming unit until they could afford a 500W+ PSU and a one-plug video card like a GTX1060 or an RX-480.  Or they could probably get away with the included PSU if they used a no-plug vid, like a GTX1050 or an RX-460.  Personally I would upgrade the PSU to at least 600W and add a 1060 or a 480.  The 600W would mean there was enough power for a better vid later.






    How do you know that it's a good deal?  What's in it?  The only thing that you know is in it is a CPU that you know that you don't want.  If the plan is to buy that and upgrade it to a respectable $800 gaming desktop, it's likely that you'd pay $700+ to buy the upgrade components.


    I thought this was a quad core and it is not, it is a dual core, probably not a great choice for going into the future with gaming.  So never mind...


    It is a quad core CPU, but it's a very low clocked quad core, which is the problem.  It's clocked lower (both base and turbo) than the Core i7 that I bought way back in 2009.
  • HrimnirHrimnir Member RarePosts: 2,385

    H0urg1ass said:

    REFURBISHED!  GET THE HOLY WATER GILES!




    I always go for refurbished PC components if I can.  It's a ridiculous assertion that It's a bad thing. Brand new parts go through WAY less testing and verification than a refurb.  Refurbs get function tested to the end of the earth and back before they're sold.  I've literally never had a problem with a refurb part and saved a crapton over the years because of it.

    "The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."

    - Friedrich Nietzsche

  • DarLorkarDarLorkar Texarkana, TXMember UncommonPosts: 1,082

    Hrimnir said:



    H0urg1ass said:


    REFURBISHED!  GET THE HOLY WATER GILES!






    I always go for refurbished PC components if I can.  It's a ridiculous assertion that It's a bad thing. Brand new parts go through WAY less testing and verification than a refurb.  Refurbs get function tested to the end of the earth and back before they're sold.  I've literally never had a problem with a refurb part and saved a crapton over the years because of it.


    Really depends on where you get them though. If you go through a place that does not have good testing, you may get junk.

    And the limited return on some places for refurb...you really need to be fully aware of both of those items, good testing of items and a decent return if one does give you issues. Once you have both of those you may be getting close to the price of a new item...

    So sure you could save some cash...but you need to do your due diligence, which a lot of folks may not know how, or do properly. Why i mostly always advise against going the refurb route when handing out advice. 
  • GladDogGladDog Pottstown, PAMember RarePosts: 845

    DarLorkar said:



    Hrimnir said:





    H0urg1ass said:



    REFURBISHED!  GET THE HOLY WATER GILES!








    I always go for refurbished PC components if I can.  It's a ridiculous assertion that It's a bad thing. Brand new parts go through WAY less testing and verification than a refurb.  Refurbs get function tested to the end of the earth and back before they're sold.  I've literally never had a problem with a refurb part and saved a crapton over the years because of it.




    Really depends on where you get them though. If you go through a place that does not have good testing, you may get junk.

    And the limited return on some places for refurb...you really need to be fully aware of both of those items, good testing of items and a decent return if one does give you issues. Once you have both of those you may be getting close to the price of a new item...

    So sure you could save some cash...but you need to do your due diligence, which a lot of folks may not know how, or do properly. Why i mostly always advise against going the refurb route when handing out advice. 


    Yeah, I've been burned on used parts before, particularly from ebay.  but I've also been burned on new stuff too.  I'm pretty up on this stuff, I've assembled about 300 computers over the last 25 years.  And other than a few excursions to ebay, if I am going to buy refurb its going to be from or through Newegg, because of their testing requirements and their refund policy.

    As far as new stuff, I've had a few run-ins with manufacturers.  If you haven't seen any of my posts on the subject, I won't ever buy anything made by Sapphire ever again.  I bought a shiny new Radeon 6870 a few years ago, with a two year warrantee.  Well, two years and 3 months after I bought it, it started putting out gibberish.  I pulled the cover and heat sink off, and they missed with the thermal paste, only abour half of the GPU was covered, you know, just the tiny square in the center of the GPU cover.  The other half was burnt black.

    I knew it was out of warrantee, but it was their fault that the card died.  So I contacted them to see if I could get a partial credit towards a replacement, maybe $25-50 bucks.  I really wasn't expecting anything, but I figured it couldn't hurt to ask.  Oh boy, was I wrong.

    You would have thought I was asking for his first born the way the 'customer service' guy replied.  After about 20 seconds of cursing, threats and attacks on my character, I hung up and have vowed never to buy anything from them again.  I don't care how good a deal it is.  I also vowed that any time the subject came up, I would tell this tale again.  And I will continue to bad mouth that company until I get an apology, something I demanded later that week that I never got.


    The world is going to the dogs, which is just how I planned it!


  • HrimnirHrimnir Member RarePosts: 2,385

    There's a big difference between used and or refurbs from a retailer.  What I was referring to, and perhaps I should have specified, is FACTORY refurbished parts.  I put the emphasis there not to be a dick, but just so that people are aware.

    If it's a refurb performed by let's say "best buy" or, microcenter, or whatever, I wouldn't touch that with a 10 foot pole.  Factory refurbs almost always carry warranties and as I said, 20+ years of buying computer components and I haven't had even a smidgeon of an issue with a refurb.  New parts on the other hand I have had all sorts of problems with.

    "The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."

    - Friedrich Nietzsche

Sign In or Register to comment.