Can a new video card fry my monitor?

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  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    The tech came to my place and he brought 3 items the motherboard,PSU and video card he changed them one by one and he said if all this fails he will take away the computer. The last thing he changed was the motherboard and the computer worked after that.

     After he left I tried the new card . Not working and I think it got damaged so returning it to Amazon . 

    Now if I get no longer any issues on the event viewer it should be good right ?
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  • Mtibbs1989Mtibbs1989 Member UncommonPosts: 3,076
    There is always the potential that a bad GPU can damage the port in which the monitor is plugged into.

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    Somebody, somewhere has better skills as you have, more experience as you have, is smarter than you, has more friends as you do and can stay online longer. Just pray he's not out to get you.
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 5
    I really don't know what the problem was the new video card or the monitor catching fire. I have no idea which caused the problem.

    Now if Amazon sends me a replacement graphic card I am not really sure I want to put it in after all this.
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  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    Just do it!
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 6
    There is an almost impossible possibility this sequence of events could happen with the substituted card right. I have a better monitor now its 2 years old. So no more ten year old monitor.

    The replacement Asus 1070 GTX Turbo card is arriving tomorrow and I can change the 770 GTX out which is a shame since they replaced the PSU,Card and Motherboard. So the 770 GTX card is new. 

    I know no one can give me an assurance and I'm aware of that but the chances a video card can blow up my monitor again is practically zero right after all these changes to my computer. I'm just so afraid now and I know  it is such a ridiculous fear but I simply cannot go back to the tech and ask them again to come fix my PC again if this goes wrong. They will think I'm scamming them.


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  • Loke666Loke666 KalmarMember EpicPosts: 20,171
    cheyane said:
    There is an almost impossible possibility this sequence of events could happen with the substituted card right. I have a better monitor now its 2 years old. So no more ten year old monitor.

    The replacement Asus 1070 GTX Turbo card is arriving tomorrow and I can change the 770 GTX out which is a shame since they replaced the PSU,Card and Motherboard. So the 770 GTX card is new. 

    I know no one can give me an assurance and I'm aware of that but the chances a video card can blow up my monitor again is practically zero right after all these changes to my computer. I'm just so afraid now and I know  it is such a ridiculous fear but I simply cannot go back to the tech and ask them again to come fix my PC again if this goes wrong. They will think I'm scamming them.
    Nah, they will just think that you are stupid ;). The tech guys see a lot worse things.

    But you should be fine, it is about as unlikely that it fries the other screen as finding Captain Kidds lost treasure on a walk at the beach.
  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    edited April 6
    If you want extra insurance, buy a new power supply before you do anything else. Not because i think it's necessarily failed, but if the motherboard failed, and that fried the video card, and somehow your monitor went at the same time - there are two other components I would think are likely to have been affected in all of that as well.

    The first is your system RAM (which is good, as it works on the new motherboard), you got lucky there because most of the time the motherboard goes, there's a very strong chance the RAM goes with it. But that's a very easy thing to check - either RAM works fine, or it doesn't, not really any in between on that one, and if the RAM does fail later on down the line, it will cause your computer to hang/crash/reboot, but it won't damage anything else.

    The second is the power supply. That you won't necessarily be able to tell, unless something else blows up a couple of weeks from now and it was all because your PSU is on the fritz anyway. Just because your computer turns on and the fans are all spinning doesn't necessarily mean the PSU is good - if a filter cap failed, or the voltage regulator is on the fritz, all that stuff would still turn on, but it would be sending dirty and dangerous power to the computer, and something else will fry eventually.

    Honestly, it really sounds like a surge or something hit your home, it's remotely possible for a video card to fry a monitor, but only very remote - like, the odds of your home getting struck by lightning and causing a surge is much higher than a monitor getting fried over a DVI or DB15 video cable.

    Also, don't think I'm saying that your PSU has failed. It takes some pretty specific equipment to actually test that, and even most computer repair shops aren't going to have that. But for what it costs to just outright replace it, it's cheap insurance against the possibility that it ~might~ have failed, and blowing up another expensive video card and motherboard and whatever else it takes with it along the way.

    Also, it wasn't clear in your tech post, but if the Dell tech already replaced the PSU and left the new one in there, then your covered already.
    Post edited by Ridelynn on
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 6
    The tech changed all three things even though he later put the old video card back  but said he will take the old one and leave the new one in ,so he changed all three things. So basically I have a new PSU,motherboard and video card.


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  • laseritlaserit Vancouver, BCMember EpicPosts: 4,578
    You should be good to go ;)

    Just don't skimp on a good surge protector. Many things cause power surges beside lightning storms.

    "Be water my friend" - Bruce Lee

  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    The new card is doing the same thing the computer starts then reboots and then blank black screen so I decided forget it am giving the card to my son or will return it to Amazon for a refund. This was what happened before after the monitor fried it would start up then reboot and then work fine. Went on for a few days then packed up and damaged the motherboard too.

    Decided that I don't want a repeat of this nightmare I cannot even sleep from worry so giving my son a free  upgrade.

    He has a 520 Seasonic PSU i5 CPU, I think the 1070 GTX Asus turbo should work with it.
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  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 7
    I am writing another post and not just amending the one on top as I wanted it to be able to receive current input. Sorry.

    This problem where on start up the computer instead of cleanly booting up goes black then reboots and the event viewer will have a bug check and the previous shutdown was not done properly message.

    What can cause this ? Will it lead to other problems if ignored ? This is what the new video card is doing. Is this a driver issue or more sinister ?

    The video card that was replaced by the tech works without rebooting the computer like this new one. Since everything but the CPU was changed it cannot be the PSU or motherboard. I cannot possibly be so jinxed that two new video cards are defective.


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  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    The video card requires a 6pin power adapter, and maybe an additional 6 or 8 pin adapter. Are those plugged in correctly?
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 8
     1070 GTX is single 8 pin as opposed to 6 pin and 8 pin the 770 GTX had. Yes I did if I can put back the 770 multiple times in I think at least 10 times between these events I should be able to put this card in to .This is why this whole incident is driving me potty. I can't understand what is going wrong. I have a 875 watt power supply even more than enough for the card.

    I also tried multiple drivers.
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  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    Just on an off chance - can you run Driver Sweeper before you pull your old card out. When that tells you to reboot - shut down, and then swap cards. When you turn the computer on again, hopefully you will see the default Windows VGA driver running on the new card, and can then re-install the latest nVidia drivers from there.

    Slight chance that for some reason, Windows is trying to boot up your new card with older nVidia drivers. I don't know that it would cause a reset, but it's something worth trying. Could also be an issue with nVidia drivers (they are not that great since Win10) - and if it boots fine on the VGA driver, but fails on the latest driver, can always pick a few versions back to find one that works.
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 8
    Well actually when I initially installed the card windows did put in a driver that was not from Nvidia a number I could not find from Nvidia. At that point it was working and had started up without the double boot. I then did a clean install of the driver to 378.78 and then when I shutdown and then started the computer it began the boot no post then reboot trouble.

    So you think I should use the Display Driver Uninstaller and try to do this again ?

    Post edited by cheyane on
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  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    Yeah, worth a shot. Also, I would try a different driver version - say 381.xx or 376.xx - might be an issue with the 378.xx driver 
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    Alright thank you
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  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    Some additional notes, from nVidia driver documentation -- not sure if these are pertinent or not.

    Uninstalling Drivers Using Device Manager is Not Supported

    Do Not Use Windows Rollback for Graphics Drivers

    [GeForce Experience]: Driver installation fails when attempting to perform a driver overinstall. To workaround, perform a clean installation.

     Error code 43 appears in the Device Manager after installing the driver with observed with HDMI display connected. [200283276] 

    [Pascal][Notebook]: The display remains blank while over installing the driver, requiring a reboot. [200273603]
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 8
    Crossing my fingers and toes the double boot has stopped for now. I will kiss you @Ridelynn if it stays solved. Thank you so much for taking the time and helping me. I really love you right now.

    I used to use Driver sweeper before in the old days but stopped after the clean install option. I will go back to using it again.

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  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 8
    It is still happening so I am trying different drivers. It seems to only happen if it is a cold boot that is after hours of it being powered down. How much damage can double boot without posting cause. If it happens once a day could I ignore it ?
    Post edited by cheyane on
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  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 5,764
    Honestly, I can't answer that, as it would depend on why it's double booting, and that's the million dollar question.

    Your computer should be able to boot up dozens of times a day with no issue though, so if it's just a matter of the computer going through two boot cycles each time - that won't hurt anything.

    Just out of curiosity - do Sleep and/or Hibernation work? Will it go to sleep, and awake from sleep normally? 
  • DAS1337DAS1337 Member UncommonPosts: 2,552
    I'll tell you what.  The first thing I would do is have the PSU tested.  I wouldn't even attempt to plug anything new in, or even turn the PC on before I made sure the PSU was still good.  You could have a bad rail.  it could be anything.  Then you said you have a new MB.  Nothing should be wrong there(Unless a bad PSU damaged the new one).  And you then just work your way down the line.  Your PC is posting, correct?  So it's not your CPU.  RAM wouldn't give you this issue.  Without a GPU, you'd see nothing or system graphics, but the CPU would boot.  No hard drive, you would post, but not boot.  You know it's not an overheat issue, since it won't boot.  I'm with everyone else here, I have never seen a GPU fry a monitor.  Now, I've also never had a monitor that old.  It's very likely that it was a surge, possibly from the new GPU you got.  But, you don't know how that short affected your other hardware.  And it could have gone all the way to the PSU.  Which is why I'd suggest starting there.  Always starting there.  It won't matter what you do, if that PSU is bad, even slightly, you are doomed.  I mean hell, none of us were there.. you could have plugged something in wrong.  Maybe the GPU wasn't completely pushed in.  I don't know.  I hope you get that sorted out though man.  I know how frustrating it is to deal with handling upgrades and installations yourself.  I stopped doing it, mostly because if I made a mistake, I ate the cost.  And we all know how expensive computers can be.  Especially gaming PC's.
  • Loke666Loke666 KalmarMember EpicPosts: 20,171
    cheyane said:
    It is still happening so I am trying different drivers. It seems to only happen if it is a cold boot that is after hours of it being powered down. How much damage can double boot without posting cause. If it happens once a day could I ignore it ?

    To me it sounds like your PSU is either underpowered or failing. A bad PSU can destroy your components (even if it isn't that common but do you feel lucky?) so my advice is to get a new. Seasonic have some good priced ones, a 650W should be more the enough.

    Never cheap out on the PSU. That is my advice as well.

    It could however be one other thing: heat. If either your PSU or GFX fan is badly (it might have gotten a powercord in it or a dustbunny or the tech guy might have failed with the mounting but the last is unlikely while the cord thing is rather common).

    So what kind of PSU do you have? If it doesn't say what brand and power it is on it I can assure you it is total rubbish and should be replaced. And how old is it (PSUs often loose a bit of juice with time, or at least cheap ones do)?
  • cheyanecheyane EarthMember EpicPosts: 4,602
    edited April 8
    Ridelynn I do not use sleep or hibernate the computer is usually turned on in the morning and left on until I shut it down at night. It does not go to sleep even when I do not use it for an hour. The monitor turns off after 5 minutes but not the hard drive it is set at never.I shall try it then to let it sleep and see if it recovers but I have shut it down several times today to see if it boots normally and it does. It only seems not to when I shut it down in the night and then turn it on in the morning.

    DAS1337 The tech who came changed the PSU,Motherboard and Video card all three items are new. The PC posts correctly once it makes it through the second boot and functions normally throughout the day. Thanks for understanding how I feel yes very frustrated.

    Loke666 The PSU was just changed. Its an Alienware one . It came with the Aurora R4 the PSU unit the tech brought came from Dell they couriered him 3 packages to handle my support issue and he changed all the three things and I was watching him the whole time.

    The previous issue was the same thing even before they changed the PSU. When I had used the new card it gave this same problem but to be fair I have had this double boot issue in the past sometimes when I changed my driver and when I find another driver it would stop. This time however the search for a driver that does not double boot is fruitless. When I went back to the 368 drivers that were always very good previously this time however I got a WHEA a hardware failure (computer not booting at all and I forced a shutdown) so ditched that driver for good. All the subsequent drivers seems to have this start up reboot problem even the latest drivers. The way I test that is to switch off the power strip after the computer has been shutdown. Then when I turn it back on it double boots.

    The tech replaced the  770 GTX and I returned the previous 1070 GTX and got another one from Amazon. So almost everything is new accept the memory and CPU.

    I really am very thankful for you all taking the time to help me like this.
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  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 17,848
    I often have to boot my computer twice, for three different reasons.

    1)  Windows 7 doesn't always handle it well if you use three 2560x1440, 144 Hz monitors in Eyefinity.  I'm not sure why, and didn't have any problems with this in Windows 10.  I suspect that it's something going outside of the bounds of what Windows 7 is really intended to handle, as it wasn't possible to have specs remotely near that when Windows 7 launched way back in 2009.

    When I boot the computer, the BIOS isn't aware of Eyefinity.  It just shows the normal single-monitor screen on two of the monitors while leaving the third monitor turned off.  When Windows gets to the login screen, it tries to turn on the third monitor and piece them together for a single large image.  Sometimes instead of turning on the third monitor, it turns the other two off so that none of them have an image to display.  Sometimes it shows some small test pattern at the top of each monitor while leaving the rest of them black.

    Sometimes I can fix the problem by unplugging one of the monitors, waiting for Windows to figure out that it has been unplugged and decide to treat it like a single monitor system, turning off one of the remaining two monitors.  Then plug the monitor back in and that resets something and sometimes it works.  Sometimes that fails and I have to reboot entirely.  I can do that without needing to see the menu, at least:  tab, tab, tab, tab, enter, up, up, up, enter.

    2)  There is a bug in Windows 7 where occasionally the interface is really unresponsive.  For example, click to minimize or restore a window and it does, but the animation takes about three seconds to play out.  There are a lot of things that Windows 7 tries to have fade in or out, but it normally takes only a small fraction of a second.  This bug makes it take a few seconds.

    I think the bug is fairly rare, but have found a number of other reports of people running into the same problem online.  Usually it doesn't happen, but if it does, it will happen right from the time I first log in.  Rebooting the computer basically rerolls whatever causes this bug to happen, which usually fixes it.

    3)  There is a bug in Tree of Savior where the game runs at irregular speeds.  Sometimes when I log in, the game only runs at perhaps 80% speed.  That is, I move slower, I attack slower, mobs move and attack slower, and everything.  Cooldowns also refresh slower, so a 40 second cooldown actually takes 50 seconds if the game is running at 80% speed.

    Rebooting the computer fixes the problem.  I don't know how it's even possible to have such a bug in an online game.  The only way I can think of for such a bug to be possible is if the server is running too slowly, but that shouldn't make it possible for me rebooting my computer to fix the problem.  But the game works how it does, and a reboot fixes it.

    ---------------------------------------------------

    That doesn't always make me reboot my computer twice.  Those three problems added together perhaps make me boot 40% more often than I would otherwise.  The Tree of Savior problem is substantially more common than the other two added together, and would presumably go away if I quit the game.  Also important is once I've booted the computer and none of those problems have cropped up, I'm guaranteed that they won't pop up later until the next time I boot my computer.

    Having to reboot a computer repeatedly is annoying, but shouldn't damage it.  Laptops are built to be powered on and off many times per day, for example.
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