Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Fuzzy Avatars Solved! Please re-upload your avatar if it was fuzzy!

OK, so it's not the power supply

KyleranKyleran Tampa, FLPosts: 20,008Member Uncommon

Have an old computer, (4-5 years) probably should toss it, but it still plays WOW well, so a household member was using it for that purpose.

Earlier in the week, the computer just shut it self off (power shut off)

It seemed to stay shut off for some period of time, not responding to the power button for several minutes.  Then it suddenly would try to start up, fans would wind up for a few seconds and then shut itself off again.

Thought it was the power supply, so put in a new one this afternoon, and again, it shut itself off immediately upon start up.

Anyone have any suggestions?  Otherwise it is likely going on the ash heap.

BTW, only has a 400W power supply, but that's what was in there since I got the box, so I replaced it with the same. I could go back and get a 520 if that really might help.

 

 

 

In my day MMORPG's were so hard we fought our way through dungeons in the snow, uphill both ways.
"I don't have one life, I have many lives" - Grunty
Still currently "subscribed" to EVE, and only EVE!!!
"This is the most intelligent, well qualified and articulate response to a post I have ever seen on these forums. It's a shame most people here won't have the attention span to read past the second line." - Anon

«1

Comments

  • comicguycomicguy los angeles, CAPosts: 123Member

    I have the problem.  bought a new computer and then turned on the old computer, now it's working again.

    I think it's the power supply too, but it suddenly turned on again.  Sometime, it takes 4 hours to turn on, the power that is.  I can tell when the power turns on because I plug a USB fan and the USB fan turns on first.   What could it be?

  • FlawSGIFlawSGI Woodstock, GAPosts: 1,379Member Uncommon

    This exact same thing happened to me about 3 weeks ago. Before the supply went out completely I experienced random restarts and the occasional power loss. Then one day it just randomly shut off and wouldn't reboot. I opened the housing up and saw that I was still getting lights on the mother board and when I hit the power button the fans would start to rotate for a split second and then nothing. I replaced the power supply and it has been fine since.

     

    I do not think the 400W supply is an issue as far as power output since it has been fine to this point. I upgraded a video card that required more than the factory power supply could provide and it is because of that that I personally had to go with more, but if the one you have has been able to run everything and you haven't upgraded anything then the output itself isn't the issue. I won't claim to be very knowledgeable when it comes to this kind of stuff but I have been dabbling with building my own so I cannot say for sure that it is a faulty power supply, but this sounds exactly like my issue and replacing it fixed it for me.

     

    Also it could be a dust issue causing your heat sinks to overheat and shutting the PC down. Not likely, but it could be something as simple as that. My wifes PC had a similar issue but we figured out it was the power cable and not the PSU.

    RIP Jimmy "The Rev" Sullivan and Paul Gray.

  • cyberpunkhobocyberpunkhobo Toronto, ONPosts: 71Member Common
    It's a shot in the dark, but have you checked if your CPU is overheating? Computers nowadays are built to automatically shut off if your CPU crosses a certain temperature threshold, which will happen relatively quickly if you have something like a faulty cooling system. If you can find a way to check the temps during boot that might narrow down your list of suspects. It should be noted, though, that if overheating is an issue you'll notice a disparity in how far your computer gets in the boot process depending on how hot or cold the CPU is to begin with (e.g., on a cold boot you'll get a little further in than on subsequent reboots).
  • bliss14bliss14 eleva, WIPosts: 565Member
    I had this happen about a year ago.  Turned out it was the motherboard.  Ended up just getting a new computer, as it was time for it anyway..
  • AvaglaorAvaglaor KoridalosPosts: 24Member Uncommon

    Ram or Motherboard.

    If you have more than one Ram dimms try to remove them and try again with one by one Ram slotted. 

    But it seems more as a motherboard problem if its not the power supply.

  • bound4hadesbound4hades Bolingbrook, ILPosts: 74Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by cyberpunkhobo
    It's a shot in the dark, but have you checked if your CPU is overheating? Computers nowadays are built to automatically shut off if your CPU crosses a certain temperature threshold, which will happen relatively quickly if you have something like a faulty cooling system. If you can find a way to check the temps during boot that might narrow down your list of suspects. It should be noted, though, that if overheating is an issue you'll notice a disparity in how far your computer gets in the boot process depending on how hot or cold the CPU is to begin with (e.g., on a cold boot you'll get a little further in than on subsequent reboots).

    ^ This.    I run into this kind of thing often. The bearing on the cpu fan might be bad and the fan locks up or hangs up just for a second or two. The heatsink might be full of dust and the fan can't pull the air through to cool it. You  can manually spin the cpu fan and if you feel a click or hear one, time to replace the fan.

  • korent1991korent1991 CakovecPosts: 1,390Member
    Originally posted by Kyleran

    Have an old computer, (4-5 years) probably should toss it, but it still plays WOW well, so a household member was using it for that purpose.

    Earlier in the week, the computer just shut it self off (power shut off)

    It seemed to stay shut off for some period of time, not responding to the power button for several minutes.  Then it suddenly would try to start up, fans would wind up for a few seconds and then shut itself off again.

    Thought it was the power supply, so put in a new one this afternoon, and again, it shut itself off immediately upon start up.

    Anyone have any suggestions?  Otherwise it is likely going on the ash heap.

    BTW, only has a 400W power supply, but that's what was in there since I got the box, so I replaced it with the same. I could go back and get a 520 if that really might help.

     

     

     

    if the fans turn on and then when it should load BIOS it goes off it's probably the motherboard.

    Also, you can check the PSU by pluging it in to the wall socket and then checking if it has the right output voltage. 

    Here's the reference of what it should output link

    "Happiness is not a destination. It is a method of life."
    -------------------------------

    image
  • KyleranKyleran Tampa, FLPosts: 20,008Member Uncommon

    The fans turn on for only a split second, then it shuts down for a few minutes.  I don't think it's a heat issue since right now it's starting cold and shutting down almost instantly.

    I did replace the power supply but still have the same issue.  Might just be time to put the old computer out to pasture and build another.

     

    In my day MMORPG's were so hard we fought our way through dungeons in the snow, uphill both ways.
    "I don't have one life, I have many lives" - Grunty
    Still currently "subscribed" to EVE, and only EVE!!!
    "This is the most intelligent, well qualified and articulate response to a post I have ever seen on these forums. It's a shame most people here won't have the attention span to read past the second line." - Anon

  • BaitnessBaitness Posts: 320Member Uncommon

    I once had an odd issue where it was the socket, not the computer that was at fault.  Old house, old wiring.  Changed the socket it was plugged into, good to go.

     

    When you changed the power supply, I am assuming it was not modular, so you had to reattach all the wires?

     

    You could also try starting it up with the bare minimum - one stick of ram, one hdd, no pci anything.  See how it does.  TBH though I am not aware of any pci or sata device that could cause the issue you are describing.

     

    With no beeping and shutting down before it has a change to heat up, I would always guess PSU or MOBO after checking the above.  I strongly doubt your CPU gave out, but that could cause a similar issue.  If your PC is staying on for more than a minute before shutting down, I think it is time to start looking at heat related problems - make sure your PSU and CPU are clean and have unblocked airflow.

     

    Good luck.

  • bound4hadesbound4hades Bolingbrook, ILPosts: 74Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Kyleran

    The fans turn on for only a split second, then it shuts down for a few minutes.  I don't think it's a heat issue since right now it's starting cold and shutting down almost instantly.

    I did replace the power supply but still have the same issue.  Might just be time to put the old computer out to pasture and build another.

     

    Your first line of info is important.  You could have a 4 wire PC fan, the black and red wires are for power, the other 2 are for metering the temp. If your pc starts and the system doesn't detect a signal from the fan, it shuts down that second on some motherboards. Now if u have another fan, you could try swapping out the fan and see if that takes care of it. If your really tech savvy, you could goggle how to test the points on your motherboard.

  • CalamarCalamar IgualadaPosts: 116Member

    Check if the cpu heat sink is correctly pressing the CPU and it is clean.

    That thing is more important to reduce CPU heat than the case fans. When it is missplaced, and doesn't press against the CPU as it should, the computer turns off almost instantly to prevent CPU damage.

    Edit: Grammar.

     

  • miguksarammiguksaram Fort Meade, MDPosts: 826Member Uncommon
    If you are sure this is not a heat issue then it sounds likes your old PSU basically killed your MB when it began to go.  They are notorious for taking other parts down with them.  Which is the exact reason it's so important to buy a quality PSU.
  • sumdumguy1sumdumguy1 avondale, AZPosts: 962Member Uncommon
    Wish I could offer some tangible advice, but sadly I don't as I would probably be repeating the same suggestions over again.  I guess I just want to offer my understanding.  When we have computer issues, its one of the most frustrating things.  I hope you gt the issue resolved quickly and get your computer back and up doing what you like.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,788Member Uncommon
    When power supplies die, they sometimes take other parts with them.  It sounds like that's what happened.  For an older rig, it's not worth replacing a bunch of parts hoping that you manage to hit everything that is damaged and/or dead.
  • syntax42syntax42 Columbus, OHPosts: 1,306Member Uncommon

    It is impossible to troubleshoot this and give a definitive answer based on the information given.  Nobody is wrong in their suggestions, so far.

    Here is an order I suggest for checking the components:

    1. Make sure the CPU is getting cooled.  It only takes seconds for a CPU to overheat with no heat sink attached.  Remove your heat sink and replace the thermal compound.  Note any issues with the old compound.

    2. Test with 1 DIMM at a time.  Use your motherboard's manual to determine which DIMM slot needs to be populated for the system to POST.

    3. Remove all connections from the motherboard other than the 24-pin connector, CPU power, and power button.  If your motherboard has integrated graphics, remove your GPU card.  If not, leave the GPU in.  If it still doesn't power up, you know it has to be the motherboard or CPU.

    4. If you can test the CPU and GPU in another system, do it.  Make sure the socket type is the same for the CPU.

  • VendakuVendaku Halifax, NSPosts: 77Member
    Originally posted by Kyleran

    The fans turn on for only a split second, then it shuts down for a few minutes.  I don't think it's a heat issue since right now it's starting cold and shutting down almost instantly.

    I did replace the power supply but still have the same issue.  Might just be time to put the old computer out to pasture and build another.

     

     

    One might not think of this, but this is in all likelihood an issue pertaining to ram. One of your sticks may be faulty, or maybe none at all, and for some reason, it messed up anyways. But ram can cause your computer to exhibit these EXACT symptoms you are describing.

    Do a test. Remove all but one of your sticks of ram. Try starting your computer. Do this multiple times with different sticks of ram.

  • redgang1redgang1 Boise, IDPosts: 35Member
    Open up your case and see if any fans are failing. When a computer turns itself off and on again it's almost always lack of power or overheating.
  • CaldrinCaldrin CwmbranPosts: 4,533Member Uncommon
    Sounds like classic motherboard issue to me but its always hard to tell for sure when you have this type of problem.. Hell it could even be the Power button on the case sticking :) ,   if its that old is it worth spending any more cash on.
  • KyleranKyleran Tampa, FLPosts: 20,008Member Uncommon
    Well all fans are spinning, power supply is new will try the RAM test next. In the old days Ram failure did not cause system to shut down, rather you would get cryptic beep codes or error messages on startup.

    In my day MMORPG's were so hard we fought our way through dungeons in the snow, uphill both ways.
    "I don't have one life, I have many lives" - Grunty
    Still currently "subscribed" to EVE, and only EVE!!!
    "This is the most intelligent, well qualified and articulate response to a post I have ever seen on these forums. It's a shame most people here won't have the attention span to read past the second line." - Anon

  • asmkm22asmkm22 Anchorage, AKPosts: 1,788Member
    It's not unusual for a power supply to deal collateral damage when it goes out.  If you're feeling up to it, check out the MB for any busted capacitors (tops will look messed up, probably caved in slightly).

    You make me like charity

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,179Member Uncommon


    Originally posted by Kyleran
    Well all fans are spinning, power supply is new will try the RAM test next. In the old days Ram failure did not cause system to shut down, rather you would get cryptic beep codes or error messages on startup.

    I've seen bad RAM do both - give beep codes or utterly brick a system to the point the power switch does absolutely nothing. Seems to depend on the motherboard and nature of the fault.

  • grndzrogrndzro Reno, NVPosts: 1,150Member
    Originally posted by Kyleran
    Well all fans are spinning, power supply is new will try the RAM test next. In the old days Ram failure did not cause system to shut down, rather you would get cryptic beep codes or error messages on startup.

    Does the bios show up. If not replace CPU.

    Is the hard drive working after startup but you have a blank screen. replace GPU.

    Yes ram would give an error code if it is toast every time. Barring a short in the ram which would not allow system start up.

    Have you done a hard reset of the bios? Take out battery and press the power button for 15 seconds when the computer is unplugged.

  • PhryPhry HampshirePosts: 6,296Member Uncommon
    With the age of the computer it might just be worthwhile cleaning and replacing the thermal paste on the CPU, the stuff is cheap enough and easy to apply, and might just be the sole cause of the overheat.image
  • syntax42syntax42 Columbus, OHPosts: 1,306Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by grndzro

    Yes ram would give an error code if it is toast every time. Barring a short in the ram which would not allow system start up.

    Not necessarily.  I've seen bad RAM cause a wide range of issues.  Anything from causing the system to not respond to the power button, random crashes, or simply being invisible to the system as if there were no DIMM in the slot.  Troubleshooting bad RAM takes patience and you can't rely on it causing beep codes every time.  

  • VendakuVendaku Halifax, NSPosts: 77Member
    OP, have you any news? I am curious. :)
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.