First time building a computer; help.

tussauctussauc Mound, MNMember UncommonPosts: 147

So I'm building a new computer and I was wondering if you wonderful people could help me out. Please let me know if all of these parts will fit together properly, if I'm missing anything and if there are any cheaper alternatives on Newegg to the parts I've chosen. Also I was wondering if I would need to buy a card of wifi separately or if it's built into the MOBO.

Here is the computer:

CASE :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811108434

MOBO :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130693

PSU :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171060

GPU :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487024

CPU :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115234

RAM :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231314

HDD :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236339

Disc Drive :: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827135304

Comments

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 6,054

    Haswell motherboard (Socket 1150) and Ivy Bridge CPU (Socket 1155) won't work together -- you have to match the socket type of the CPU to the socket type of the motherboard. Haswell (1150) is the more current, but honestly you won't notice much difference between the two, and I'd say go with Ivy if it's less expensive.

    That motherboard does not have WiFi - You can get one with it, but I recommend getting an external WiFi bridge, the USB adapters are cheap, and there are plenty of PCI models around.

    If you have enough money for the Intel setup, you may want to consider an SSD for primary storage. That's about all I'll say on that.

    I didn't get much farther than that, although you need to remember to include a Windows license unless you are planning to be creative with it.

  • prowessprowess st louis, MOMember UncommonPosts: 165

    Ridelynn is correct.  You're looking at a mobo built for 4th generation intel CPUs and a 3rd generation intel CPU...

     

    While the specs indicate that you'll be fine with that power supply, I would NEVER recommend building with a 450.  

     

    You can see with http://images10.newegg.com/BizIntell/tool/psucalc/index.html?Tpk=power%20supply%20calculator that a comparable setup to what you're trying to build will require 460W

     

    Better to go for a 600 or better..  in case you ever want to SLI your GPU or add a 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th hard drive and max out your RAM..

    image
    I chose the Xfinity speed test because it does not reveal my ISP.

  • prowessprowess st louis, MOMember UncommonPosts: 165

    Also, protip:

    Don't buy "fancy" RAM...  Especially not 2x4GB for a new build...  Get 1 stick at 8GB so you never have to throw those suckers away.  fill all your slots with the highest capacity and highest speed available and absolutely avoid anything that looks fancy.

    image
    I chose the Xfinity speed test because it does not reveal my ISP.

  • hann18alxhann18alx New Port Richey, FLMember Posts: 16

    1st off. MOBO & CPU wont work 2gether. An easy way to match CPUs & MOBOs is matching the socket number of course & some motherboards work better with Sandy Bridges others with Ivy bridge. although alot of people dont think that matters looking into what your MOBO is NORMALLY paired with is just making sure your getting out what you put in. 

    GPU is fine for its price. Ram is normal. 

    Your PowerSupply is a bit low. With an GTX 750 your recommended to have atlest 500W, And safe is 600. I think 450 is 2 low. Other then that I think your good lol.

    Personally what I would do is get in touch with support over at NewEgg. Those guys are awesome and will basiclly create the best system in your budget if you let them

  • prowessprowess st louis, MOMember UncommonPosts: 165

    http://www.microcenter.com/product/385181/Ballistix_Sport_8GB_DDR3-1600_(PC3-12800)_CL9_Desktop_Memory_Module

     

    Cheaper RAM, equal specs, never have to throw it away.  Good RAM doesn't need a gimmick.

    image
    I chose the Xfinity speed test because it does not reveal my ISP.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAMember EpicPosts: 6,054

    The system (assuming the CPU/Motherbaord is corrected) would work with a ~good~ 450W power supply. I didn't look this particular one up, so I can't attest to it's quality.

    The 750 does not draw a lot of power at all - it is extremely power efficient, the CPU is pretty low key as well, and those are the 2 big players.

    That being said, with 450W you don't have a lot of room for upgrading the video card or overclocking. I usually advise 600-650W, which is big enough for pretty much any CPU/Single GPU, including some moderate overclocking, but on a tight budget you can make the case to go lower, so long as you realize what your doing by going lower.

  • zevianzevian toledo, OHMember UncommonPosts: 403
    Originally posted by prowess
    Also, protip: Don't buy "fancy" RAM...  Especially not 2x4GB for a new build...  Get 1 stick at 8GB so you never have to throw those suckers away.  fill all your slots with the highest capacity and highest speed available and absolutely avoid anything that looks fancy.

     

     

    This is not a protip,   its a notip.

     

    You always want to buy 2 sticks of ram so they run in dual channel mode, you will get more FPS, with 2x matching sticks of ram, than 1x.   You especially dont want different sticks of ram.   i.e. 1x kingston 1x corsair.   You want MATCHING PAIRS FOR BEST PERFORMANCE AND COMPATIBILITY.

  • prowessprowess st louis, MOMember UncommonPosts: 165
    Originally posted by zevian
    Originally posted by prowess
    Also, protip: Don't buy "fancy" RAM...  Especially not 2x4GB for a new build...  Get 1 stick at 8GB so you never have to throw those suckers away.  fill all your slots with the highest capacity and highest speed available and absolutely avoid anything that looks fancy.

     

     

    This is not a protip,   its a notip.

     

    You always want to buy 2 sticks of ram so they run in dual channel mode, you will get more FPS, with 2x matching sticks of ram, than 1x.   You especially dont want different sticks of ram.   i.e. 1x kingston 1x corsair.   You want MATCHING PAIRS FOR BEST PERFORMANCE AND COMPATIBILITY.

    That's correct.  You want two sticks for dual channel mode, and they must be matching in order to take advantage of dual channel mode..  However, that doesn't speak to my point, which is if you buy a pair of 4GB sticks, you can upgrade to 2 8GB sticks and then what will you do with the 4GB sticks?  What happens in 3 years when 32GB is the norm and you've got 2 4GB sticks in your system?  Best to buy a reputable, no fluff 8GB stick so you can get a second one to run dual channel if you see any performance issues and never have to throw a stick away.  as long as it's the same make/model RAM, it will run in dual-channel mode just fine.  bundled matched pairs is just a gimmick.

    image
    I chose the Xfinity speed test because it does not reveal my ISP.

  • syntax42syntax42 USAMember UncommonPosts: 1,378
    Originally posted by prowess
    Originally posted by zevian
    Originally posted by prowess
    Also, protip: Don't buy "fancy" RAM...  Especially not 2x4GB for a new build...  Get 1 stick at 8GB so you never have to throw those suckers away.  fill all your slots with the highest capacity and highest speed available and absolutely avoid anything that looks fancy.

     

     

    This is not a protip,   its a notip.

     

    You always want to buy 2 sticks of ram so they run in dual channel mode, you will get more FPS, with 2x matching sticks of ram, than 1x.   You especially dont want different sticks of ram.   i.e. 1x kingston 1x corsair.   You want MATCHING PAIRS FOR BEST PERFORMANCE AND COMPATIBILITY.

    That's correct.  You want two sticks for dual channel mode, and they must be matching in order to take advantage of dual channel mode..  However, that doesn't speak to my point, which is if you buy a pair of 4GB sticks, you can upgrade to 2 8GB sticks and then what will you do with the 4GB sticks?  What happens in 3 years when 32GB is the norm and you've got 2 4GB sticks in your system?  Best to buy a reputable, no fluff 8GB stick so you can get a second one to run dual channel if you see any performance issues and never have to throw a stick away.  as long as it's the same make/model RAM, it will run in dual-channel mode just fine.  bundled matched pairs is just a gimmick.

    That isn't likely to happen.  The speed at which gaming PCs need more RAM is not increasing as fast as you're making it sound.  Back in 2004, when Windows XP was the go-to OS for gaming, using 4GB of RAM was suggested and anything more than that was wasted.  Ten years later, the suggested amount for gaming is 8GB and even that is far more than average games are taking advantage of.  Even if we do need 16GB in the next 5 years, DDR4 will be the standard by then.  Don't expect to need 32GB for at least ten years, if not more.

    By the time 32GB is needed, you won't be able to buy 8GB DDR3 DIMMs from retailers.  Going with 2 x 4GB DIMMs is good for now, and leaves room for expanding to 16GB total RAM to extend the life of the PC if it is needed before the technology is replaced by the next iteration of computers.

     

    I hope that signature is intended to be sarcasm.  It is quite obvious who your ISP is.

  • syntax42syntax42 USAMember UncommonPosts: 1,378
    As for the original build, the OP may want to consider using a SSD for the OS and game drives.  I find responsiveness of Windows, fast boot time, and fast loading times very well worth the money spent on a SSD.  Going with ~240GB gives you plenty of room for games without having to uninstall things.
  • prowessprowess st louis, MOMember UncommonPosts: 165
    Originally posted by syntax42
    Originally posted by prowess
    Originally posted by zevian
    Originally posted by prowess
    Also, protip: Don't buy "fancy" RAM...  Especially not 2x4GB for a new build...  Get 1 stick at 8GB so you never have to throw those suckers away.  fill all your slots with the highest capacity and highest speed available and absolutely avoid anything that looks fancy.

     

     

    This is not a protip,   its a notip.

     

    You always want to buy 2 sticks of ram so they run in dual channel mode, you will get more FPS, with 2x matching sticks of ram, than 1x.   You especially dont want different sticks of ram.   i.e. 1x kingston 1x corsair.   You want MATCHING PAIRS FOR BEST PERFORMANCE AND COMPATIBILITY.

    That's correct.  You want two sticks for dual channel mode, and they must be matching in order to take advantage of dual channel mode..  However, that doesn't speak to my point, which is if you buy a pair of 4GB sticks, you can upgrade to 2 8GB sticks and then what will you do with the 4GB sticks?  What happens in 3 years when 32GB is the norm and you've got 2 4GB sticks in your system?  Best to buy a reputable, no fluff 8GB stick so you can get a second one to run dual channel if you see any performance issues and never have to throw a stick away.  as long as it's the same make/model RAM, it will run in dual-channel mode just fine.  bundled matched pairs is just a gimmick.

    That isn't likely to happen.  The speed at which gaming PCs need more RAM is not increasing as fast as you're making it sound.  Back in 2004, when Windows XP was the go-to OS for gaming, using 4GB of RAM was suggested and anything more than that was wasted.  Ten years later, the suggested amount for gaming is 8GB and even that is far more than average games are taking advantage of.  Even if we do need 16GB in the next 5 years, DDR4 will be the standard by then.  Don't expect to need 32GB for at least ten years, if not more.

    By the time 32GB is needed, you won't be able to buy 8GB DDR3 DIMMs from retailers.  Going with 2 x 4GB DIMMs is good for now, and leaves room for expanding to 16GB total RAM to extend the life of the PC if it is needed before the technology is replaced by the next iteration of computers.

     

    I hope that signature is intended to be sarcasm.  It is quite obvious who your ISP is.

    Who is my ISP?

    I will paypal you 100 USD if you can correctly guess my ISP.

    my system has 32GB of RAM right now..  Sure, you'll have to buy a whole new computer when DDR4 comes out, ya know with a solid state array capable of 100000 IOps and a 188 nano-core processor..  So, I guess you're right? 

    image
    I chose the Xfinity speed test because it does not reveal my ISP.

  • zevianzevian toledo, OHMember UncommonPosts: 403

    If i have extra RAM (from an upgrade) i typically try to use it in a different box, or upgrade a friends computer with it for some cash.

     

    Not buying 2x sticks of RAM is doing yourself a disservice just to save a couple bucks in a few years when you hypothetically will need more RAM.  

     

    OP buy 2x4 sticks of matching ram.  8gb of RAM is going to be plenty for games for the next few years to come, if your worried about some future proofing then get 2x8gb of ram.   Dont worry too much about futre proofing though, odds are very likely your processor will be out of date before your ram is, and your going to need a whole new motherboard at that point because the socket is sure to change by that point.

  • prowessprowess st louis, MOMember UncommonPosts: 165

    I think it's important to note that dual channel is only going to increase performance in games by roughly 5%...  if at all.  Games depend on your GPU's memory much more than the system memory and will typically only call RAM/cache for things that are not performance impacting, like items and stats..

     

    Now, if you're going to query a database or compile a build, you're going to see performance increases of almost 20%.

     

    The claim that it will "double your performance" is not based on actual computer science.

     

    Not that I don't recommend buying RAM in pairs...  Only that I would not recommend buying 4GB sticks.

    image
    I chose the Xfinity speed test because it does not reveal my ISP.

  • syntax42syntax42 USAMember UncommonPosts: 1,378
    Originally posted by prowess Who is my ISP? I will paypal you 100 USD if you can correctly guess my ISP. my system has 32GB of RAM right now..  Sure, you'll have to buy a whole new computer when DDR4 comes out, ya know with a solid state array capable of 100000 IOps and a 188 nano-core processor..  So, I guess you're right? 

    Light takes about 4ms to travel through 500 miles of fiber, leaving only 4ms for switching and routing.  Your ISP is either Comcast or a company that connects directly into their network.

     

    How much of that 32GB of RAM does your system actually use for gaming?  The OP could be spending the money on other components instead of wasting it on RAM that won't get used for the reason they bought the PC.

     

    I'm starting to think you're just trolling.  Putting SSDs in a RAID is only going to slow them down, for all but the most expensive SSDs.  Your obscure CPU probably sucks at single-threaded performance, which games typically thrive on.  Your efforts to insist on 32GB of RAM for gaming have no real argument to support your point.  

    You might have a $10,000 computer, but your advice is worthless to people seeking to build a gaming system.

    Now that I think about it, that speed test is probably not even connected to a residential network.  It is probably a machine in a data center.

  • jdnewelljdnewell Spring Hill, TNMember UncommonPosts: 2,204

    OP

    Get a better PSU. A good solid 550-600w should be enough. I would not go with anything less than 500w.

    Consider an SSD over an HDD. You will be glad you did.

    Buy two sticks of RAM, not just one as was suggested earlier. 2 x 4g or 2 x 8g will be plenty. I have 16gb in my PC and it is wasted on gaming. 8gb would be plenty, especially on a budget where the money can be put to better use.

    Make sure to match your CPU & Mobo socket #s. Otherwise they will not work together.

    Personally I would go with a better GPU. But thats up to you.

    List your budget and people can suggest builds for you. If you on a more limited budget you may can look at some AMD builds instead of intel. Switching to AMD may leave more room for a better PSU & GPU in the budget.

     

    Edit:

    No way in hell 32gb of RAM will be the norm anytime soon, especially not before DDR4 becomes the norm. Buying 1 x 8gb stick of RAM to go in a new system is bad advice. Buy matching pairs to take advantage of the dual channel on the mobo. There are some instances where 16g or 32g are needed, gaming or most consumer home applications are not one of them.

  • prowessprowess st louis, MOMember UncommonPosts: 165
    Originally posted by syntax42
    Originally posted by prowess Who is my ISP? I will paypal you 100 USD if you can correctly guess my ISP. my system has 32GB of RAM right now..  Sure, you'll have to buy a whole new computer when DDR4 comes out, ya know with a solid state array capable of 100000 IOps and a 188 nano-core processor..  So, I guess you're right? 

    Light takes about 4ms to travel through 500 miles of fiber, leaving only 4ms for switching and routing.  Your ISP is either Comcast or a company that connects directly into their network.

     

    How much of that 32GB of RAM does your system actually use for gaming?  The OP could be spending the money on other components instead of wasting it on RAM that won't get used for the reason they bought the PC.

     

    I'm starting to think you're just trolling.  Putting SSDs in a RAID is only going to slow them down, for all but the most expensive SSDs.  Your obscure CPU probably sucks at single-threaded performance, which games typically thrive on.  Your efforts to insist on 32GB of RAM for gaming have no real argument to support your point.  

    You might have a $10,000 computer, but your advice is worthless to people seeking to build a gaming system.

    Now that I think about it, that speed test is probably not even connected to a residential network.  It is probably a machine in a data center.

     

    I take 3 hops through another backbone provider's network before reaching the comcast network and if this isn't a residence, I better put some pants on :-P

     

    You're right, games will RARELY utilize more than 4GB of system RAM and that's not really going to change for quite a while..   So, there is your confused argument...  Dual channel increases performance for things that are memory intensive, which games are not.  Best practice: get 2x8GB.  There's no sense in being a cheapo and buying 2x4GB rather than 1x8GB just to have a 2% increase in performance in games..  It's not about future proofing, it's about not wasting money.  get a solid 8GB stick and buy a second when you have the cash to boost your performance a bit..  or buy 2 8GB sticks..  8GB is good but 16GB is obviously better..

    I'm the type of guy who doesn't like to worry about my browser tabs affecting the performance of my games or tools..  I also don't like to decommission my old systems, I'd much rather repurpose them...  So, in 15 years, when I'd want to maximize a system to be capable of being a media-center or a server of some kind, I don't want to have to throw away RAM.

     

    The only virtue of buying 4GB sticks instead of 8GB sticks is that they're cheaper.  8GB sticks will never be a wasted investment, however.

    image
    I chose the Xfinity speed test because it does not reveal my ISP.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member EpicPosts: 18,164

    You want a DVD burner, not a DVD-ROM drive.  The former can both read and write, while the latter can only read.  Even if you don't care about burning DVDs, it's cheaper to get one that can both read and write than one that is read-only.

    You definitely want 2 memory modules of whatever capacity, not one.  I could understand getting two 8 GB modules back when it cost about $70 a year and a half ago, but not now that it costs double that.  Two 4 GB modules for 8 GB in total is already about double what you really need today, so that's plenty of future-proofing right there.

    Don't get one of the lower clock speed Intel quad core processors.  You lose too much performance and don't save enough money to justify it.  Either spend what it takes to get a Core i5-4670 (or 4670K if you're looking to overclock) or else save some money and go AMD.

    Unless you're really sensitive to power consumption for some strange reason, don't get that video card unless you picked it largely for the free game credit.  It's barely faster than a Radeon R7 260X, but a lot more expensive:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131564

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814150688

    On the other side, a GeForce GTX 660 is massively faster without being much more expensive:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130826

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125508

    The problem with the power supply is not the wattage so much that at least some of Cooler Master's GX series power supplies are junk.  It can be hard to know what to look for in a power supply, so it's probably easier if I just pick one for you:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182066

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151136

    Okay, so that was two.  Pick one of the two.

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