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DOA CPU or Motherboard Issue?

syntax42syntax42 Columbus, OHPosts: 1,305Member Uncommon

I have an Asus Sabertooth 990FX (revision 1, I think) with a FX-4100 CPU.  I decided to go ahead and upgrade to a FX-8350.

First, I put the new CPU in and found that it wouldn't pass POST.  So, I read the ASUS website and discovered that I needed to update the BIOS to support the new CPU.  After swapping the CPU to the old one, upgrading the BIOS and swapping back to the new CPU, it still doesn't POST.  The LEDs on the motherboard blink normally - CPU, then RAM, then CPU again - but nothing stays on to indicate a bad component and the troubleshooting LEDs don't proceed to the video card or BIOS LEDs.  I don't have a PC speaker to test, but if the CPU was bad, the manual says the LED next to it should stay on.

I also tried with only 1 stick of memory and default BIOS settings.

Is my new CPU bad, or is my motherboard not really compatible even though ASUS claims it is? 

Comments

  • mmoskimmoski plymouthPosts: 282Member
    Have you got enough power from the power supply ? 
  • Mtibbs1989Mtibbs1989 Fredericksburg, VAPosts: 2,920Member Uncommon

    Are you sure you bought the right socket type CPU for the MOBO? Never mind that I just checked all the hardware.

     

    image

    Somebody, somewhere has better skills as you have, more experience as you have, is smarter than you, has more friends as you do and can stay online longer. Just pray he's not out to get you.
  • mmoskimmoski plymouthPosts: 282Member
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989

    Are you sure you bought the right socket type CPU for the MOBO?

    I just checked it, seems ok via the Asus site.

  • AtmaDarkwolfAtmaDarkwolf Edmonton, ABPosts: 353Member
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989

    Are you sure you bought the right socket type CPU for the MOBO?

     

    .. if he has it in, yes he did, or he put it in with a hammer.

     

    Nowdays the socket types are pretty obvious if its the right or wrong one... the wrong one just won't go in.

    Its pretty easy to put a system together, the trickiest part is the thermal paste.
  • Mtibbs1989Mtibbs1989 Fredericksburg, VAPosts: 2,920Member Uncommon
    I'm going to go ahead and say it's the new processor seeing as though your old one is still working with that motherboard.

    image

    Somebody, somewhere has better skills as you have, more experience as you have, is smarter than you, has more friends as you do and can stay online longer. Just pray he's not out to get you.
  • Mtibbs1989Mtibbs1989 Fredericksburg, VAPosts: 2,920Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by AtmaDarkwolf
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989

    Are you sure you bought the right socket type CPU for the MOBO?

     

    .. if he has it in, yes he did, or he put it in with a hammer.

     

    Nowdays the socket types are pretty obvious if its the right or wrong one... the wrong one just won't go in.

    Its pretty easy to put a system together, the trickiest part is the thermal paste.

    What's so hard about applying a pea size amount of thermal paste to a processor?

    image

    Somebody, somewhere has better skills as you have, more experience as you have, is smarter than you, has more friends as you do and can stay online longer. Just pray he's not out to get you.
  • mmoskimmoski plymouthPosts: 282Member
    Originally posted by AtmaDarkwolf
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989

    Are you sure you bought the right socket type CPU for the MOBO?

     

    .. if he has it in, yes he did, or he put it in with a hammer.

     

    Nowdays the socket types are pretty obvious if its the right or wrong one... the wrong one just won't go in.

    Its pretty easy to put a system together, the trickiest part is the thermal paste.

    What ! you mean you don't cut the pins off to make it fit ! xD

    Maybe a long shot, he boots with the old cpu into bios, sets up bios to what the new cpu needs then powers down installs the new cpu and try's to boot again, updating bios can be a pain and it can mean the end of a mobo if it screws up heh.

  • AtmaDarkwolfAtmaDarkwolf Edmonton, ABPosts: 353Member
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989
    Originally posted by AtmaDarkwolf
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989

    Are you sure you bought the right socket type CPU for the MOBO?

     

    .. if he has it in, yes he did, or he put it in with a hammer.

     

    Nowdays the socket types are pretty obvious if its the right or wrong one... the wrong one just won't go in.

    Its pretty easy to put a system together, the trickiest part is the thermal paste.

    What's so hard about applying a pea size amount of thermal paste to a processor?

    LOL thats not the hard part. The hard part is when you have to take the heatsink OFF, or (in 2 of the systems i built last year) where the bloody cpu power connectors and/or mobo screws were right next to the cpu socket(And would be below the heatsink when in place)

     

    Its really NOT a bad thing, but like i said, and I shall repeat, the 'trickiest part' of building a system TODAY, is applying the thermal gel. EVERYTHING else about system building(the physical part anyways) is easy, like paint by numbers easy. 10 years ago u had USB, firewire, gaming ports, serial ports, all which had identical pin arrangements on the mobo, and u connect one wrong/backwards/etc and u get a nice fireworks show and that mobo is fried forever... or u get the row of pins for the LED lights(power, hard drive activity, etc) and power/reset switches, case speakers, etc, and you would have to CAREFULLY read the manual to see which pin goes with which connector. Nowdays most are removed from the rest and clearly labled on the mobo(hell, I can't remember exactly how long ago i actually had to look at the manual at all to assemble a system)

     

    hmm one thought though, that might be above my thermal paste example, would be installing the new gpu's... bloody things are freaking HUGE and heavy(And have their own 'support' braces) and those can be a pain. LOL

  • Mtibbs1989Mtibbs1989 Fredericksburg, VAPosts: 2,920Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by AtmaDarkwolf
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989
    Originally posted by AtmaDarkwolf
    Originally posted by Mtibbs1989

    Are you sure you bought the right socket type CPU for the MOBO?

     

    .. if he has it in, yes he did, or he put it in with a hammer.

     

    Nowdays the socket types are pretty obvious if its the right or wrong one... the wrong one just won't go in.

    Its pretty easy to put a system together, the trickiest part is the thermal paste.

    What's so hard about applying a pea size amount of thermal paste to a processor?

    LOL thats not the hard part. The hard part is when you have to take the heatsink OFF, or (in 2 of the systems i built last year) where the bloody cpu power connectors and/or mobo screws were right next to the cpu socket(And would be below the heatsink when in place)

     

    Its really NOT a bad thing, but like i said, and I shall repeat, the 'trickiest part' of building a system TODAY, is applying the thermal gel. EVERYTHING else about system building(the physical part anyways) is easy, like paint by numbers easy. 10 years ago u had USB, firewire, gaming ports, serial ports, all which had identical pin arrangements on the mobo, and u connect one wrong/backwards/etc and u get a nice fireworks show and that mobo is fried forever... or u get the row of pins for the LED lights(power, hard drive activity, etc) and power/reset switches, case speakers, etc, and you would have to CAREFULLY read the manual to see which pin goes with which connector. Nowdays most are removed from the rest and clearly labled on the mobo(hell, I can't remember exactly how long ago i actually had to look at the manual at all to assemble a system)

     

    hmm one thought though, that might be above my thermal paste example, would be installing the new gpu's... bloody things are freaking HUGE and heavy(And have their own 'support' braces) and those can be a pain. LOL

      Yeah, my major fear when it comes to new hardware are the sizes of the GPU's. I'm afraid that one day they won't fit into my machine and on that day I will not be a happy gamer. I personally don't see what you're getting at with the whole thermal compound really. I think it's one of the easiest parts. I guess I'm lucky enough to not have to deal with those types of MOBOs.

    image

    Somebody, somewhere has better skills as you have, more experience as you have, is smarter than you, has more friends as you do and can stay online longer. Just pray he's not out to get you.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,772Member Uncommon

    The hardest part of building a new computer depends on whether it's an AMD or Intel system.  If Intel, it's getting those stupid push pins for the CPU heatsink to stay put.  AMD has a better mounting mechanism, so the hardest part is probably connecting the front of the case to the motherboard so that the power and reset buttons and lights and such work.

    Anyway, a BIOS update is definitely necessary, as the motherboard probably launched long before the processor.  Have you been able to get into the BIOS or check as the computer does the POST with the old CPU to make sure that it shows the new BIOS version?

  • syntax42syntax42 Columbus, OHPosts: 1,305Member Uncommon
    I swapped back and forth between my old and new CPUs, trying different things.  BIOS settings were at default.  The correct BIOS version for the 8350 was showing.  I forget what else I tried, but nothing would let the 8350 POST.  Old CPU is back in and the new one is going through the RMA process.
  • syntax42syntax42 Columbus, OHPosts: 1,305Member Uncommon

    I finally got a new FX-8350 from Newegg, but not without some trouble from their RMA department.

     

    After reading other reviews of the FX-8350, it seemed possible that Newegg was claiming customers bent pins, rendering the RMA invalid and leaving customers $200 in the hole.  Sure enough, when my processor arrived at Newegg's RMA facility to be inspected, they sent me an email claiming I had bent pins.  I was smart enough to take pictures of the processor before shipping it, just so I could argue my case with their customer service.  After over an hour of arguing and threatening to charge back my credit card, they gave in to my demand to replace the processor.

     

    Just as a warning to other buyers, beware of shady corporate tactics like this.  I'm sure Newegg isn't the only one, so be prepared to defend yourself if a company decides to be dishonest or if their employees are incompetent and bend your processor pins when removing them from the packaging.  You have 30 days to dispute credit card charges, so don't let them delay your RMA.

     

    I don't appreciate being forced to pay for RMA shipping on a part that was sent to me DOA.  I probably won't buy from Newegg again after their dishonesty or employee who bends processor pins.

     

    The new processor works without issues.

  • SomeOldBlokeSomeOldBloke Lancaster, UKPosts: 2,141Member Uncommon
    The last two ASUS boards I bought were faulty out of the box so I stopped buying them and switched to MSI instead, had no problems at all with them.
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