Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Original MMORPG Concept from Fulltime Gamer

psysentionpsysention BrisbaneMember Posts: 19 Uncommon

Hi there,

Its Atlantix.. i'm 30yrs old full-time gamer.. I play online games since 97.. Played high-end in every major MMO since Ultima online.. Cleared every major raid content created by different Devs in every major game, some of them regular kills, some of them World first, some of them server first, some of them EU first..

 

I am not a creative person, but I have come up with truly unique, original, never been done style MMORPG concept..

I would like to share this concept with a Publisher or Designer... I do not look for money, or i do not intend to sell this concept..

I will give this unique concept to a decent Publisher or Designer for totally free..

I prefer spending my time with gaming, its a major part of my life.. This concept i found can be the key to next-generation MMORPG.. It would be nice to play it.. In order to play it if i have to give this idea away, than so be it.. Because not only me, every MMO player would play something truly Original and Basic..

 

If there are any decent Publisher or Designer out there who are looking for fresh and unique ideas.. please contact me via e-mail: aakgur@gmail.com

 

Cheers

Atlantix

«1

Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member Posts: 16,742 Epic

    The basic problem with this is that everyone in the entire world who is able and willing to create a game has ideas of his own that he likes better than your ideas.  That's why his ideas are his ideas and your ideas are not his ideas.  It doesn't mean that your ideas are bad; just that everyone likes his own ideas the best.

    Ideas for the broad strokes of a game really don't have much value.  The number of good ideas for a game exceed the number of games that can be made by an an enormous ratio.  And that's even if we restrict to good ideas; if you're willing to include bad ideas, it's more lopsided yet.

    What does have value is filling in the fine details for games that are going to be made anyway.  Indeed, that's what professionals who create games are paid to do.  Make a model for this character, for that building, or whatever.  Write up quest text for this quest, or fill in the details of how many of which monsters or whatever you have to kill for it.  But the key is that ideas have to fit into the particular game that they're already making.

    But go ahead and post your ideas so that we can rip them to shreds.  Or maybe even say that this or that sounds cool.  That's what forums like this are for.

  • psysentionpsysention BrisbaneMember Posts: 19 Uncommon
    Originally posted by Quizzical
    The basic problem with this is that everyone in the entire world who is able and willing to create a game has ideas of his own that he likes better than your ideas.  That's why his ideas are his ideas and your ideas are not his ideas.  It doesn't mean that your ideas are bad; just that everyone likes his own ideas the best. Ideas for the broad strokes of a game really don't have much value.  The number of good ideas for a game exceed the number of games that can be made by an an enormous ratio.  And that's even if we restrict to good ideas; if you're willing to include bad ideas, it's more lopsided yet. What does have value is filling in the fine details for games that are going to be made anyway.  Indeed, that's what professionals who create games are paid to do.  Make a model for this character, for that building, or whatever.  Write up quest text for this quest, or fill in the details of how many of which monsters or whatever you have to kill for it.  But the key is that ideas have to fit into the particular game that they're already making. But go ahead and post your ideas so that we can rip them to shreds.  Or maybe even say that this or that sounds cool.  That's what forums like this are for.

    I didn't wrote i have the best idea in the World.. I announced that i have unique and never been done style mmorpg concept.. if anybody serious who is interested of listening, i might willing to share it.. thats all..

     

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAMember Posts: 14,247 Rare
    Originally posted by psysention

    I am not a creative person, but I have come up with truly unique, original, never been done style MMORPG concept.. I would like to share this concept with a Publisher or Designer... I do not look for money, or i do not intend to sell this concept.. I will give this unique concept to a decent Publisher or Designer for totally free..

    They have it already, probably in a dozen different versions, each create by someone with experience in game design.

     

    See, this is the actual test of your agenda and motive here. If you simply want to give it away for free and do want to see it made, post it to a website and regularly share a link to it on game forums, with members of your top tier guilds (several of which who probably already work in the industry) and get the word out there. The more developers that know about it and attempt to build on it, the better chance there is of you getting the game you want.

     

    But that's not what you really want, is it?   ;)

     

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member Posts: 16,742 Epic
    Originally posted by Loktofeit But that's not what you really want, is it?   ;)

    It could also plausibly be an issue of "I have these ideas in my head, but it's something of a hassle to write them all down if no one will care."  Do note that the original poster has 10 posts as of this writing, not thousands.

  • tawesstawess LkpgMember Posts: 3,501 Rare

    Also a good question is... Why has it not been done before.

     

    the top five to that is usually

    1: Too costly

    2: To small consumer base

    3: Underdeveloped proposal

    4: To technically challenging

    5: Nobody is doing it (ironic i know but fairly common... It is always risky to be nr one)

     

    But i wish you the best of luck, after all kickstarter have proved that even crazy ideas can become something great.

    Tawess soapbox

    This have been a good conversation

  • psysentionpsysention BrisbaneMember Posts: 19 Uncommon

    Everybody has a right to think whatever they wish.. i can not prove my intentions virtually.. 

    To be honest i don't want to  share my ideas to public and some f2p mmo company gets this idea and make a greedy cash shop game out of it..

    i want give it to a designer or publisher who can create a real sub based mmorpg..

     

    i'm sorry if i cause any curiosity.. i didn't mean to do that.. 

     

    Thx for your opinions..

     

     

  • psysentionpsysention BrisbaneMember Posts: 19 Uncommon
    Originally posted by tawess
    Also a good question is... Why has it not been done before.   the top five to that is usually 1: Too costly 2: To small consumer base 3: Underdeveloped proposal 4: To technically challenging 5: Nobody is doing it (ironic i know but fairly common... It is always risky to be nr one)   But i wish you the best of luck, after all kickstarter have proved that even crazy ideas can become something great.

    6. its not been done. Because,  maybe nobody thought about it yet?.

    ---

    I have an original idea.. i do not wish to give to the public, but i want to give it to a person who can make something beautiful out of it.. This way i can keep in contact with the designer and develop the idea in to something further..

    As i mentioned in the Original Post.. i'm not after money.. i organize www.pakawala.com .. i'm financially stable thank to god.. I have a unique idea and only in my supervision it can be something great..

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member Posts: 16,742 Epic

    And why would any game developer want to make your game when he has ideas of his own that he likes better than yours?  Even if he loved your initial ideas and did start making your game, he'd surely soon run into many situations where he wanted to do something different from what you had in mind, and then he'd do what he wanted, not what you wanted.

    If you want your game to ever be made, you have two options:

    1)  Make it yourself.  This is only practical if both you're seriously talented and your game can be made on a shoestring budget.

    2)  Get rich and then hire other people to make it for you.

    If you want anything remotely similar to your game to be made, then the best thing to do is to get your ideas in front of as many people as you can, whether game developers or otherwise.  Maybe someone here will read it, like a few elements, and post them as his own ideas elsewhere.  Maybe a few elements of your game will be included in some others as an eventual result.  Or maybe not (okay, probably not), but that's the most that you can hope for if you're not involved in either creating or funding the game yourself.  And no, sending a proposal to a game developer doesn't count as being involved in creating the game.

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAMember Posts: 14,247 Rare
    Originally posted by psysention I have an original idea.. i do not wish to give to the public, but i want to give it to a person who can make something beautiful out of it.. This way i can keep in contact with the designer and develop the idea in to something further..

    ...and now we get to what you really want.

     

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • WhiteLanternWhiteLantern Nevada, MOMember Posts: 2,732 Uncommon

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    The basic problem with this is that everyone in the entire world who is able and willing to create a game has ideas of his own that he likes better than your ideas.  That's why his ideas are his ideas and your ideas are not his ideas.  It doesn't mean that your ideas are bad; just that everyone likes his own ideas the best. Ideas for the broad strokes of a game really don't have much value.  The number of good ideas for a game exceed the number of games that can be made by an an enormous ratio.  And that's even if we restrict to good ideas; if you're willing to include bad ideas, it's more lopsided yet. What does have value is filling in the fine details for games that are going to be made anyway.  Indeed, that's what professionals who create games are paid to do.  Make a model for this character, for that building, or whatever.  Write up quest text for this quest, or fill in the details of how many of which monsters or whatever you have to kill for it.  But the key is that ideas have to fit into the particular game that they're already making. But go ahead and post your ideas so that we can rip them to shreds.  Or maybe even say that this or that sounds cool.  That's what forums like this are for.

    Originally posted by Loktofeit

    Originally posted by psysention

    I am not a creative person, but I have come up with truly unique, original, never been done style MMORPG concept.. I would like to share this concept with a Publisher or Designer... I do not look for money, or i do not intend to sell this concept.. I will give this unique concept to a decent Publisher or Designer for totally free..

    They have it already, probably in a dozen different versions, each create by someone with experience in game design.

     

    See, this is the actual test of your agenda and motive here. If you simply want to give it away for free and do want to see it made, post it to a website and regularly share a link to it on game forums, with members of your top tier guilds (several of which who probably already work in the industry) and get the word out there. The more developers that know about it and attempt to build on it, the better chance there is of you getting the game you want.

     

    But that's not what you really want, is it?   ;)

     

    Deja vu.

     

    Do you guys have canned answers for these type of threads?

    I want a mmorpg where people have gone through misery, have gone through school stuff and actually have had sex even. -sagil

  • jimdandy26jimdandy26 salem, ORMember Posts: 527

    I did battle with ignorance today, and ignorance won.

    To exercise power costs effort and demands courage. That is why so many fail to assert rights to which they are perfectly entitled - because a right is a kind of power but they are too lazy or too cowardly to exercise it. The virtues which cloak these faults are called patience and forbearance.

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAMember Posts: 14,247 Rare
    Originally posted by WhiteLantern
    Originally posted by Quizzical The basic problem with this is that everyone in the entire world who is able and willing to create a game has ideas of his own that he likes better than your ideas.  That's why his ideas are his ideas and your ideas are not his ideas.  It doesn't mean that your ideas are bad; just that everyone likes his own ideas the best. Ideas for the broad strokes of a game really don't have much value.  The number of good ideas for a game exceed the number of games that can be made by an an enormous ratio.  And that's even if we restrict to good ideas; if you're willing to include bad ideas, it's more lopsided yet. What does have value is filling in the fine details for games that are going to be made anyway.  Indeed, that's what professionals who create games are paid to do.  Make a model for this character, for that building, or whatever.  Write up quest text for this quest, or fill in the details of how many of which monsters or whatever you have to kill for it.  But the key is that ideas have to fit into the particular game that they're already making. But go ahead and post your ideas so that we can rip them to shreds.  Or maybe even say that this or that sounds cool.  That's what forums like this are for.

    Originally posted by Loktofeit

    Originally posted by psysention

    I am not a creative person, but I have come up with truly unique, original, never been done style MMORPG concept.. I would like to share this concept with a Publisher or Designer... I do not look for money, or i do not intend to sell this concept.. I will give this unique concept to a decent Publisher or Designer for totally free..

    They have it already, probably in a dozen different versions, each create by someone with experience in game design.

     

    See, this is the actual test of your agenda and motive here. If you simply want to give it away for free and do want to see it made, post it to a website and regularly share a link to it on game forums, with members of your top tier guilds (several of which who probably already work in the industry) and get the word out there. The more developers that know about it and attempt to build on it, the better chance there is of you getting the game you want.

     

    But that's not what you really want, is it?   ;)

     

    Deja vu.

     

    Do you guys have canned answers for these type of threads?

    No, but it's entirely possible that one side of my brain just starts farting out something I wrote once before just to quickly get something in the thread before the other side of my brain - the side saying "Really? You really feel the need to reply to this?" - makes me hit the Back button.

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • anemoanemo Member Posts: 1,006 Uncommon

    The moment you realize you're already in a forum of people who would love to read through your idea.

    EDIT: on a side note being a full time gamer is likely to only get you inbred ideas.   The best ideas and the most original ones come from doing other things in RL. 

    Practice doesn't make perfect, practice makes permanent.

    "At one point technology meant making tech that could get to the moon, now it means making tech that could get you a taxi."

  • RollieJoeRollieJoe Raleigh, NCMember Posts: 445 Uncommon
    Originally posted by jimdandy26
    Op, you should read this.   http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/issues/issue_221/6582-Why-Your-Game-Idea-Sucks

    I read this article and took issue with one glaring flaw in the logic behind one of its core points: that the people most qualified to design games (gameplay concepts, mechanics, etc.) are necessarily the same people who are most qualified to code / produce assets (graphics, sound, etc.) for said games.  This is simply not true in all cases, and we have absolutely no reason to think it is even true in the majority of cases (or in any cases for that matter).

     

    When you build a home you hire an architect to design it, and a carpenter (and electrician, etc.) to construct it, based on the architect's designs.  The architect themselves may have no idea how to use a planesaw properly or how to install combination drywall, just as the plumber probably knows nothing about weight distribution in a collonade. 

     

    The same is true for the engineers who designed the car you drive VS those who welded it together or installed the seats, and any number of other examples.

     

    It is undoubtedly true that there are many not just good, but *superior* game ideas that are not being made / used simply because those with these superior ideas don't have the unrelated skills needed to produce them

     

    Unfortunately it is also undoubtedly true that for every superior game idea that someone has, a hundred other people have inferior ones that are not being used for good reason, and because of this, all the ideas get lumped together and classified as "useless unless you make the game yourself."  

  • mmoguy43mmoguy43 In cyberspaaaaaaceMember Posts: 2,751 Uncommon
    Make friends with people in a game company that want to make the same kinds of games that you want to play and then bring up your idea and see what they have to say.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member Posts: 16,742 Epic
    Originally posted by RollieJoe
    Originally posted by jimdandy26
    Op, you should read this.   http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/issues/issue_221/6582-Why-Your-Game-Idea-Sucks

    I read this article and took issue with one glaring flaw in the logic behind one of its core points: that the people most qualified to design games (gameplay concepts, mechanics, etc.) are necessarily the same people who are most qualified to code / produce assets (graphics, sound, etc.) for said games.  This is simply not true in all cases, and we have absolutely no reason to think it is even true in the majority of cases (or in any cases for that matter).

     

    When you build a home you hire an architect to design it, and a carpenter (and electrician, etc.) to construct it, based on the architect's designs.  The architect themselves may have no idea how to use a planesaw properly or how to install combination drywall, just as the plumber probably knows nothing about weight distribution in a collonade. 

    And what reason is there to believe that someone who doesn't have any of the skills involved in creating a game and doesn't care to get such skills would be any good at designing games?

    Is there anyone in the world at all who is capable of filling in all of the details of how complex game mechanics ought to work, but not capable of writing the code or learning how to write it pretty quickly?  If you can write down explicit formulas for how something ought to work, then you've often (but not always) done most of the work to code it right there.  The hard part is typically going from vague, high level ideas to detailing exactly how it ought to work.

  • CoatedCoated Woodside, CAMember Posts: 391 Uncommon
    Originally posted by jimdandy26
    Op, you should read this.   http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/issues/issue_221/6582-Why-Your-Game-Idea-Sucks

    I want to back that article, but it's just so wrong. Let me tell you why,

    Companies love bad game ideas.

    Take a look at the top 10 games to be released soon. Terrible, generic  ideas so poorly thought out that any idiot on these forums could put it together. I honestly was baffled for many years at how investors were backing some of these game developers. That was, until I realized the simple truth of the matter. They love crap. It seems the worse your idea is, the more money they will throw at it. If anything, the article title should be, "Why your game idea isn't bad enough".

    I have no clue what the OP has in mind, but I can guarantee you it isn't as generic as the top 10 titles soon to be released. So people can go ahead and bash this guy for wanting to contribute, but the real bashing should be aimed at these terrible, terrible, terrible game developers who actually do produce this garbage.

    God you people suck. God these games F'ing suck.

  • RollieJoeRollieJoe Raleigh, NCMember Posts: 445 Uncommon
    Originally posted by Quizzical And what reason is there to believe that someone who doesn't have any of the skills involved in creating a game and doesn't care to get such skills would be any good at designing games? Is there anyone in the world at all who is capable of filling in all of the details of how complex game mechanics ought to work, but not capable of writing the code or learning how to write it pretty quickly?  If you can write down explicit formulas for how something ought to work, then you've often (but not always) done most of the work to code it right there.  The hard part is typically going from vague, high level ideas to detailing exactly how it ought to work.

    Reflect on this for just a few moments and the answers should be readily apparent.  First, let's be clear, we are talking about the skills needed to design a game (the gameplay mechanics, rules, etc.) VS those needed to code it (including art/sound assets, networking code, etc.)

     

    Now let's pick one example (out of dozens or even hundreds) that addresses all the questions you ask.  Take the card game "Magic: The Gathering" created by Richard Garfield.   By his own admission, Mr. Garfield is neither a competent programmer, nor artist (despite having now been a part of several actual video game projects).  So here we have someone who does not have the skills and doesn't care to get the skills needed to actually code/create a game, yet is clearly fantastic at designing games by any measure.  Furthermore he is fully capable of filling in all the complex game mechanics including explicit formulas for a daunting set of rules.

     

    Now in this case the game in question was well-suited to a non-digital format and so he was able to successfully create a game with Zero actual programming, and then use this success to hire programmers to create the also very successful Magic Online.  But imagine if it had been an amazing, revolutionary idea for an MMO, rather than an amazing, revolutionary idea for a card game.  Now being one of the world's greatest game designers means nothing, because he isn't a programmer his idea gets ignored.

     

    As I said in my original post, due to the far higher volume of *bad* ideas from non-programmers, there is no easy solution to this problem.  But that doesn't change the fact that it is both incorrect and completely irrational to think that a good programmer makes a good game designer, or that a good game designer *has* to be a competent programmer. 

  • anemoanemo Member Posts: 1,006 Uncommon

    I would happily work with a designer that has a published board, pen and paper, or cardgame.   Essentially the margin for getting there is even smaller than it is for indy games(physical product, lower profit margins, and higher risk), this means the person is a combination of:  really good, insanely persistent, amazingly connected, intouch with the business, or lottery-style lucky.

    The design skill you're seeing with even new-style kids games like "King of Tokyo" tend to be leagues above of what you see in even most indy games.   

    Practice doesn't make perfect, practice makes permanent.

    "At one point technology meant making tech that could get to the moon, now it means making tech that could get you a taxi."

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAMember Posts: 14,247 Rare
    Originally posted by RollieJoe
    Originally posted by Quizzical And what reason is there to believe that someone who doesn't have any of the skills involved in creating a game and doesn't care to get such skills would be any good at designing games? Is there anyone in the world at all who is capable of filling in all of the details of how complex game mechanics ought to work, but not capable of writing the code or learning how to write it pretty quickly?  If you can write down explicit formulas for how something ought to work, then you've often (but not always) done most of the work to code it right there.  The hard part is typically going from vague, high level ideas to detailing exactly how it ought to work.

    Reflect on this for just a few moments and the answers should be readily apparent.  First, let's be clear, we are talking about the skills needed to design a game (the gameplay mechanics, rules, etc.) VS those needed to code it (including art/sound assets, networking code, etc.)

    Now let's pick one example (out of dozens or even hundreds) that addresses all the questions you ask.  Take the card game "Magic: The Gathering" created by Richard Garfield.   By his own admission, Mr. Garfield is neither a competent programmer, nor artist (despite having now been a part of several actual video game projects).  So here we have someone who does not have the skills and doesn't care to get the skills needed to actually code/create a game, yet is clearly fantastic at designing games by any measure.  Furthermore he is fully capable of filling in all the complex game mechanics including explicit formulas for a daunting set of rules.

    Now in this case the game in question was well-suited to a non-digital format and so he was able to successfully create a game with Zero actual programming, and then use this success to hire programmers to create the also very successful Magic Online.  But imagine if it had been an amazing, revolutionary idea for an MMO, rather than an amazing, revolutionary idea for a card game.  Now being one of the world's greatest game designers means nothing, because he isn't a programmer his idea gets ignored.

    As I said in my original post, due to the far higher volume of *bad* ideas from non-programmers, there is no easy solution to this problem.  But that doesn't change the fact that it is both incorrect and completely irrational to think that a good programmer makes a good game designer, or that a good game designer *has* to be a competent programmer. 

    Your post is a great example of what Quizzical is talking about. You see no difference between designing a physical card game, where play surface, player communication, player technical limitations and other factors do not have to be accounted for and a client/server-based persistent state virtual environment such as the one the OP presents.

    Take something as simple as sound. Not just the creation of great sounds for the game, but which sounds have priority, how many sounds to play at once, and managing the performance hit all while balancing audible cues with atmosphere. Sound is one of the many problems that do not exist in a tabletop game because you have the direct interaction of the players and, well, a player is usually aware of what he touched and if he acted on the object in the manner he wished to.

    That's just the tip of the iceberg. Anyone can create a crappy MMO. Anyone. However to create a stable, engaging, visually pleasing and enjoyable MMO takes a wide range of talents. Each aspect that the game designer is unfamiliar with is an aspect that will be out of his control. That invariable means it will be incomplete, not to spec or simply absent. This is not to say he needs to be more knowledgeable about user interfaces than the UI guy or more knowledgeable about the graphics pipeline than the technical artist, but lack of familiarity with each of these things means he won't know to figure them into development and won't be able to identify if they - or any other systems - are failing, absent or negatively impacting work.

    To suggest that someone who has only driven cars, but knows nothing of engineering or automotive mechanics, can build a car would be silly, no? One could suggest hiring all the right talent to make the car a reality, but with an inexperienced lead, that really doesn't work out well.

     

    Without at least a basic understanding of the various aspects of creating something as massive as an MMO there's no way to tell if a game idea is decent or crap. You can bank on crap, though. The issue here is that he wants to 'give' his game idea to a developer but wants control over how to develop it.

    That's simply ridiculous. image

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member Posts: 16,742 Epic
    Originally posted by RollieJoe
    Originally posted by Quizzical And what reason is there to believe that someone who doesn't have any of the skills involved in creating a game and doesn't care to get such skills would be any good at designing games? Is there anyone in the world at all who is capable of filling in all of the details of how complex game mechanics ought to work, but not capable of writing the code or learning how to write it pretty quickly?  If you can write down explicit formulas for how something ought to work, then you've often (but not always) done most of the work to code it right there.  The hard part is typically going from vague, high level ideas to detailing exactly how it ought to work.

    Reflect on this for just a few moments and the answers should be readily apparent.  First, let's be clear, we are talking about the skills needed to design a game (the gameplay mechanics, rules, etc.) VS those needed to code it (including art/sound assets, networking code, etc.)

     

    Now let's pick one example (out of dozens or even hundreds) that addresses all the questions you ask.  Take the card game "Magic: The Gathering" created by Richard Garfield.   By his own admission, Mr. Garfield is neither a competent programmer, nor artist (despite having now been a part of several actual video game projects).  So here we have someone who does not have the skills and doesn't care to get the skills needed to actually code/create a game, yet is clearly fantastic at designing games by any measure.  Furthermore he is fully capable of filling in all the complex game mechanics including explicit formulas for a daunting set of rules.

     

    Now in this case the game in question was well-suited to a non-digital format and so he was able to successfully create a game with Zero actual programming, and then use this success to hire programmers to create the also very successful Magic Online.  But imagine if it had been an amazing, revolutionary idea for an MMO, rather than an amazing, revolutionary idea for a card game.  Now being one of the world's greatest game designers means nothing, because he isn't a programmer his idea gets ignored.

     

    As I said in my original post, due to the far higher volume of *bad* ideas from non-programmers, there is no easy solution to this problem.  But that doesn't change the fact that it is both incorrect and completely irrational to think that a good programmer makes a good game designer, or that a good game designer *has* to be a competent programmer. 

    Suppose that someone has the talent to be a phenomenally good game designer.  But he's unwilling to learn any of the skills needed to actually make a game.  Now suppose that you run a game company.  Do you hire him?  (Don't hold your breath waiting for an application, as he doesn't much want to work for you.)

    Let's take an analogy.  Let's suppose that a player has all of the football talent of Peyton Manning.  But he doesn't much like football and isn't willing to work out or practice very much.  You run an NFL team.  Do you hire him?

    Let's suppose that Richard Garfield has the talent to be an incredibly good MMORPG designer.  But let's suppose that he doesn't have any of the skills needed to actually make an MMORPG and isn't interested in learning them.  Would you go chase him and try to hire him anyway?

    God-given talent isn't the only thing that matters.  The key to my first sentence that you quoted is not merely "doesn't have the skills", but also "doesn't care to get such skills".  If Richard Garfield decided that he really wanted to get into the MMORPG industry and was willing to learn whatever skills game companies wanted him to learn, he probably could get a job in the industry--and could have some role in designing the games.  (I'm not saying that he should; he's done pretty well for himself without making MMORPGs.)

  • anemoanemo Member Posts: 1,006 Uncommon

    The legend of zelda games are really good examples of design and production skill if you take even one small part pushing a boulder(a core-ish mechanic).  

    You see link exerting himself with different animations(sheathing sword, the pushing itself), you get new sounds(link huffing and puffing, the sound of the boulder, the sound of unlocking a door, background noises becoming quieter), you see the boulder itself moving, you're going to see some particles of dust/grass getting disrupted and that's before you take the puzzle itself into play.  

    There's a lot going on there with just one or two button presses, even then I'm missing a lot.  Which is kinda silly since I'm working on a zelda-alike.

    ____________

    Design work is just as tedious as anything else you're not willing to learn.

    Practice doesn't make perfect, practice makes permanent.

    "At one point technology meant making tech that could get to the moon, now it means making tech that could get you a taxi."

  • xaritscinxaritscin CaliMember Posts: 350 Uncommon
    Originally posted by anemo
    The legend of zelda games are really good examples of design and production skill if you take even one small part pushing a boulder(a core-ish mechanic).   You see link exerting himself with different animations(sheathing sword, the pushing itself), you get new sounds(link huffing and puffing, the sound of the boulder, the sound of unlocking a door, background noises becoming quieter), you see the boulder itself moving, you're going to see some particles of dust/grass getting disrupted and that's before you take the puzzle itself into play.   There's a lot going on there with just one or two button presses, even then I'm missing a lot.  Which is kinda silly since I'm working on a zelda-alike. ____________ Design work is just as tedious as anything else you're not willing to learn.

    QFT

  • RollieJoeRollieJoe Raleigh, NCMember Posts: 445 Uncommon

    There still seems to be a lack of distinction drawn between "designing" and "creating" perhaps due to vague word choice.  For any major MMO, hundreds of people with completely different skillsets are involved in the final product.   Voice actors, graphic artists, writers, network coders, sound design, etc. etc.

     

    The point is that there is absolutely no reason to think that the person (or persons) contributing in the role of "game designer," in other words, the person(s) who are coming up with the core game principles, mechanics, features, rules, etc. need to be competent in a programming language.  It makes no more sense than requiring all your voice actors to be fluent in Javascript.  Furthermore, there's no reason to think that someone who is a very good programmer, efficient and knowledgeable when it comes to coding, would be a good game designer (we see the proof this is not the case on a weekly basis).

     

    If I am a company looking to make an MMO, requiring my lead game designer to be able to program, or be a good voice actor, or be a talented 3D artist would be a ridiculous qualification.  The problem, as I stated, is that aside from past success, there is no way for a company to separate good potential game designers from bad ones.  And so in some cases they simply hire people with unrelated skills (such as coding) because they lack a better filter.

     

    Again, the notion that in order to be a good game designer you need to be a good programmer is absurd.  However, if you actually want to be involved in making an MMO with no prior experience creating a successful game, then yes, in practice you likely need to learn how to program.  This won't make you a good game designer, but it will help your chances of getting hired to work on a game where, if you actually *are* a good game designer, that might be noticed. 

  • AntiquatedAntiquated Member Posts: 1,411 Rare
    Originally posted by psysention
    I prefer spending my time with gaming, its a major part of my life.. If there are any decent Publisher or Designer out there who are looking for fresh and unique ideas.. please contact me via e-mail: aakgur@gmail.com

    Sure you can spare the time from your busy gaming schedule to write it up?

    Oh, up to the publlishers to contact you. That'll work :nod nod:

    Is there a company that will pay me for my ideas?
    The good news is that your great ideas are a fabulous start and you may be able to turn your creative ideas into cold, hard cash!!!  The bad news (if you want to call it that) is that it is nearly impossible to sell ideas. I wish we could tell you that such companies (those that would buy unprotected ideas) exist, but we know of no one who buys ideas. The problem is that there are many people with lots of good ideas.

    What should I do after I get a great idea?
    Follow through!

    Sounds like you need to...

«1
Sign In or Register to comment.