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MMORPG for kids concept (could be adapted for grown-ups.)

blackraistblackraist MontrPosts: 23Member

Hi all,

  I would like your opinion on this for your kids (or kids to be).

There is a lot to learn from 5 to 12 years old. No game effectively keep the kids glued to a screen to learn things, but most kids want to play games.

I thought of a MMORPG where kids would have to answer fast and basic trivia questions to effectively gain XP.

Here's how. During a basic fight, let's say you hit 10 times. During this time, you have to answer to questions. (Let's say 3 questions per non-boss fight.) Each good answer results in a 33% XP gained from the total XP the mob gives.

Here comes the tricky part. Answering questions during fights is boring and annoying. To answer that, it would be possible to fill a bar with questions, either on the PC or on a phone or tablet. This way, we could give our phone to our kid for them to answer questions for half and hour and the let them play for the same time. They learn their tables, flags, forms, colours, lakes, verbs, etc. Then, they use this to level their char.

How about that?

Thanks

Blackraist

Comments

  • mmoguy43mmoguy43 In cyberspaaaaaacePosts: 2,702Member Uncommon
    WHY?
  • RobokappRobokapp Dublin, OHPosts: 5,691Member Uncommon

    does answering questions really teach much ?

     

    -can females get prostate cancer?

    -in how many ways can you organize zero objects?

    -Who was Wellington?

    -What height is Pamir at?

     

    are you smarter and more knowledgeable already ?

     

    seems like a boring game they'd have no inerest in, tbh.

     

    if LEGO Universe couldn't make it, what chance does ... this ... have ?

    image

  • blackraistblackraist MontrPosts: 23Member

    Probably to give kids an incentive to learn. Addition tables, multiplication tables and many things kids had to learn are boring to learn by heart. This would probably help.

     

  • RobokappRobokapp Dublin, OHPosts: 5,691Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by blackraist
    Probably to give kids an incentive to learn. Addition tables, multiplication tables and many things kids had to learn are boring to learn by heart. This would probably help.  

    very different topic...but addition and multiplication can be thought in the form of a turn-based single-player game as part of trivial theorycrafting.

     

    think of simply manipulating buffs and debuffs in a turn-based combat game, picking the buffs and debuffs etc.

     

    this CAN be achieved much easier without plain asking 'what's 3 * 5 during a bossfight. :)

    image

  • blackraistblackraist MontrPosts: 23Member
    Originally posted by Robokapp
    does answering questions really teach much ?   -can females get prostate cancer? -in how many ways can you organize zero objects? -Who was Wellington? -What height is Pamir at?   are you smarter and more knowledgeable already ?   seems like a boring game they'd have no inerest in, tbh.   if LEGO Universe couldn't make it, what chance does ... this ... have ?

    I get what you mean. The game itself must be good. This question option needs to be activated upon parent's choice. Finally, the questions must be fast and with a choice of answer on the screen like "6 x 7?" or "Which picture is the flag of Sweeden?"

    But I get that if the game is boring, no concept can help it.

  • blackraistblackraist MontrPosts: 23Member
    Originally posted by Robokapp
    Originally posted by blackraist
    Probably to give kids an incentive to learn. Addition tables, multiplication tables and many things kids had to learn are boring to learn by heart. This would probably help.  

    very different topic...but addition and multiplication can be thought in the form of a turn-based single-player game as part of trivial theorycrafting.

     

    think of simply manipulating buffs and debuffs in a turn-based combat game, picking the buffs and debuffs etc.

     

    this CAN be achieved much easier without plain asking 'what's 3 * 5 during a bossfight. :)

    This would be a very good idea, I agree, but the main point would be to add a second device (i.e tablet, phone, etc.) to farm answers while not playing the game of for a friend to farm answers while you play and vice versa after a while.

    Thanks for your input.

  • RobokappRobokapp Dublin, OHPosts: 5,691Member Uncommon

    take a quick look at Urban Rivals. it's probably not a game that'd hold a kid's attention but at math level it might be somewhere in the area of what you're thinking.

     

    each card has abilities like +8atk, -12 op atk, +3 power...and then you have pills, 12 per game, and each pilli multiplies the attack of your card by +1.

     

    I played it for a while and often times I found myself going "okay...how many pills do I need ? I hav 6 atk, a +2 atk power effect, he does a -12 atk and had a 5 atk... so (6+2)*#pills-5*hispills-12... uh...uh...he'll probably go 3 pills...so effectively 32...so I need 4 pills to tie him...my monster's lower level so wins ties...okay. 4 pills. let's try.

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVj0TWC2Ang

     

    crappy example of what I mean.

    image

  • blackraistblackraist MontrPosts: 23Member
    Thanks. I'll sure have a look at this.
  • mmoguy43mmoguy43 In cyberspaaaaaacePosts: 2,702Member Uncommon
    I'm sorry but I think what you are trying to do is wrong. Are you tryring to educate kids with the game or give them something to waste valuable growing-up time on? If you are trying to get them to learn, reward curiousity to learn more. Let them use and apply what they learn. A quiz game with battles? No, just no.
  • blackraistblackraist MontrPosts: 23Member
    Originally posted by mmoguy43
    I'm sorry but I think what you are trying to do is wrong. Are you tryring to educate kids with the game or give them something to waste valuable growing-up time on? If you are trying to get them to learn, reward curiousity to learn more. Let them use and apply what they learn. A quiz game with battles? No, just no.

    Hi, I will not take for granted that you have no kids or that you were born in 1943, but kids do play games with fights. They also play outdoor, practice sports and play tag, soccer and many movie and videogames related games in the schoolyard.

    What I want to do that will raise hell upon me is to take some of the videogame play time and make it "useful" while interesting.

    As you probably know, the game is not finished (not started yet) and I ask for inputs here. Some kids will lose childhood minutes-hours-days, but if I remembers correctly, kids have a lot of spare time and don't continuously use it to make something useful out of it, which is perfecly ok as is.

    Thanks

     

    On a side not, the "could be adapted for grown-ups" was regarding the phone and tablets parts. I think it is time that we have a game that has some content for times when we are not on the PC. Answering question would be a bad idea for adults, but what about crafting, gathering, shopping (Blizzard started something basic, I know).

    I think it could be nice to have something to do while on the tablet or on the phone that is useful for the PC game. I know reading is nice on the bus, but we're talking gaming, ain't we?

  • ghstwolfghstwolf hampstead, NHPosts: 386Member
    Originally posted by blackraist
    On a side not, the "could be adapted for grown-ups" was regarding the phone and tablets parts. I think it is time that we have a game that has some content for times when we are not on the PC. Answering question would be a bad idea for adults, but what about crafting, gathering, shopping (Blizzard started something basic, I know). I think it could be nice to have something to do while on the tablet or on the phone that is useful for the PC game. I know reading is nice on the bus, but we're talking gaming, ain't we?

    This is the strongest part of your idea.  An app or "facebook" game that gives some benefit for players would be a good move.  Multiple clients synergizing in a single world is almost neccessary for the genre to advance (at least in a virtual world sense).

    Gathering and basic crafting could be well served by a "farmville".  Certain skills would be better advanced by app style minigames than in game repetition (lock picking comes to mind as nearly universal, but there are many others that are setting dependent).  A "stock market" app (likely included in the farmvillesque game) could work, as could a Base/Lair Tycoon (which would create/modify the MMO players' world).  Dust514 was a good idea that made almost every mistake possible, however, starting with a multiclient design should fix many of those deficiencies.

    The Edutainment MMO for kids is a terrible idea (I'm talking "Jump to conclusions mat" bad).  I can usually offer a structured and usable breakdown to support a statement like that, but on this, it's just landmine after landmine.  There is no market and trivia is weak as a learning tool.  Any degree of salvaging this would require going single player and moving to skills (speed reading, memory, spacial reasoning and math). 

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAPosts: 14,247Member Rare
    Originally posted by blackraist
    Probably to give kids an incentive to learn. Addition tables, multiplication tables and many things kids had to learn are boring to learn by heart. This would probably help.

    In that age range you have three completely different learning styles. I think what you need to do first is identify the group you want to teach, research how they learn, and then build your learning game from there. Maybe at the high end (tweens) you'll find interest in your question thing, so if you're tied to that process, go for tween.

     

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 16,647Member Epic

    If an idea starts with, "I'm sure that adults will hate this, but maybe kids would like it better," they won't.  If a game isn't a good MMORPG at all, then it won't be a good MMORPG for kids, either.

    Some educational things are easier to teach in games than others.  Geography is probably the easiest:  just use as your game map a map of whatever part of the world you want players to learn.  Trying to teach grammar in a game, on the other hand, is basically impossible.

  • ironoreironore Utah, UTPosts: 957Member Common

    I am involved in education and I have actually created table-top multiplayer games and simulations for use by an entire classroom full of 12 year olds.  I have also thought a lot about gaming and education and how they work together.  Providing incentives for academic performance and connecting that with leveling up in a game, that is one thing, but if you are talking about having the educational aspects be PART of the game then there is one thing you must know and where most 'educational games' fail:

    That is that you must make the thing you are trying to teach through the game BE intrisically part of the game.  You can't just take the educational content and wrap it in the packaging of a game or you will acheive nothing.

    In teaching there is basic knowlege, then there are higher order skills and abilities to synthesize and formulate new connections.  In your basic RTS game a player soon knows the names and attributes of various buildings, units, resources and how they come in to play together.  

    If you want to teach math facts, the game must be based on units that interact with values that are real.  Units with value 3 are better against multiples of 3, etc.  If the game is about single cell organisms, then they should be called by actual names, represent the actual entities (at least in the relevent aspects) and behave and interact with other elements in the game in a way that simply playing the game causes the player to learn certain vocubulary and have some idea of how these systems interact.   What about a astrophysics sandbox game where you could tweak planet size, orbital diameter, moon number and sizes, axial tilt and then observe how the tides are affected, weather and seasons are messed with, 

    The challenge is making this happen and having the gameplay be fun.  It can be done, but it takes an approach from both the education and game design persepectives.  Most educational game companies have expertise in neither area, and when a education with no game design experience tries they might not get it right.  Also a game designer with no educational background will struggle as well.  These things could all be brought together, but for some reason, at this point they rarely are.

    IronOre - Forging the Future

  • steelheartxsteelheartx Biloxi, MSPosts: 434Member Uncommon
    It's a really interesting idea, but wonder if it should be geared to actual problem solving in a game.  Could put an educational spin on delivery quests (math problems) and creative thinking problems.

    Looking for a family that you can game with for life? Check out Grievance at https://www.grievancegaming.org !

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