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What would you like to see in a RPG?

finny174finny174 Lincoln, NEPosts: 2Member

Hi, Im creating a MMORPG game  using Unity3D and I would like to know what would you like to see in a RPG? Or what's something new that you would like to see? The more ideas the better. Thanks.

Finny174

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Comments

  • anothernameanothername CityPosts: 138Member

    *grin* Oh, seriously?

    Just a virtual replacement for the weekend pen & paper RPG session.

  • HolySaint333HolySaint333 Germantown, MDPosts: 24Member

    This wouldn't be totally new, since Aion has done it, but have more MMORPG's with cinematics to the story. Another thing is Square going back to what was cool and not weird things they do these days with their RPG's. I was so upset with FF13 due to all the freaken monsters that were half robotic. Squaresoft use to own, and now its not the same since they became Square Enix.

    If I were to make something up, how about a boss that gets stronger and stronger the more people that have defeated it in the MMORPG. Post the latest person to beat it in a board somewhere so that he can be billy badass and sip on Pina Coladas.

    If you ask my opinion I'd have to wait for my turn! :)

  • azurebonbonazurebonbon IrakleionPosts: 2Member

    RPGs have great stories, interesting characters, etc. I like turn based RPG systems because they allow for more strategic gameplay. Fast action is fun and all, but sometimes I prefer a system that makes me think instead of simply react. That's what makes the best RPG gameplay systems fun for me. Also RPG's can be anything, thats one of the greatest things about: Action, puzzles, exploration, platforming, shooting ext  and there are also turn Based RPGs, at their best, are very very strategic and challenging, even if they don't require good reflexes (a good example is Digital Devil Saga 1+2 for the PS2). I enjoyed playing Grandia 2 because of the awesome combat system, but the story was not Hemingway, to put it bluntly. Rpgs like Oblivion, however, is really awesome because you actually get to, you know, play a role instead of having to accept that my character is totally lame and can't do anything right like in Final Fantasy Whatever.

     

  • wyndstrykerwyndstryker Toronto, ONPosts: 7Member

    Try something with no levels, that would be something impressive IMO.

  • Mister_ReMister_Re Detroit, MIPosts: 142Member

    As for the best old rpg Star Ocean the second story on the playstation. you can learn alot from that one. Also final fantasy A2 for the ds had a nice skill/ ability sytsem. I'm also a game developer, but I want to see an rpg that shies away from the standard get hurt and heal system. Fallout 3 has done the best job with the health system that i've seen so far. Also a new vaariety of characters/classes/jobs.

  • legend55legend55 AntwerpenPosts: 155Member

    What I really like to see is a MMORPG with alot of focus on smithing and mining your own weapons, dunno sounds like a new killer MMORPG:D

  • TommiJyurroTommiJyurro Ruidoso, NMPosts: 51Member

    I would say, attempt to combine sandbox and theme-park gaming.  It will be tough and you won't please everyone, but definitely divide the game into "Storyline-non-storyline" areas, so that is player x wants to do their own thing in your universe, they can without feeling cut out of the loop simply because they don't want to be part of the war between Empire X and their nemesis.

    Also, strongly consider your genre's player base: fantasy mmo players by and large are way different than sci-fi mmo players.  It is very unfair to lump the two groups into the same mold.  Sci-fi-ers will need a great deal more leeway in the game than fantasy, since sci-fi itself is based upon pushing the boundaries as far as they will go, and fantasy tends more towards either "Thy will be done, my king" or "They will rue the day!".

    As for aesthetics, players can overlook graphics for a while if the gameplay is awesome, and close attention to the sounds of the game is a must -more so than graphics, as it lends background to the gameplay that helps immersion on a psychological level.

    Anything new here? Hmmm... Nope. o/

  • TommiJyurroTommiJyurro Ruidoso, NMPosts: 51Member

    Ever hear of EVE online? It's only been around since 2003...

    Anything new here? Hmmm... Nope. o/

  • Trixie9819Trixie9819 Redwood City, CAPosts: 1Member

    If you're making a game for RPers, there are certain things that need to be in the game mechanics.

     

    Chat bubbles, a simple thing that many MMOs don't implement. Why? Because chat bubbles have a much smaller range than the chat text windows. If you're in the middle of a dozen people, but only talking to one or two it's a heck of a lot easier to just watch the bubbles than the migraine inducing chat scroll.

     

    Sitting in chairs/couches/ground/other surfaces.  Again, a very, very simple thing. If you really want to go the extra mile, make swivel bar stools (which I've never seen in an MMO).  Roleplayers use the screen and the pixels to show what their characters are doing, so they don't have to describe it. "Johnny walks across the room and orders a beer. He thanks the bartender and then spots an empty table so he rushes over there before anyone else can take it. His body shows every weary hour of the past fourty eight that he's spent on patrol, and he sits there with an almost rapturous expression on his face as the alcohol slides down his throat and warms his stomach"  Yeah, but he didn't have to describe where he sat, or who the bartender was or even what he was wearing because all of that is there on the screen.

     

    Emotes and animations.  One of the biggest pet peeves in MMORPGs is that the emote system is rudimentary and difficult to work with. The animations are limited and they look really stupid.  Invest in some good motion capture files that are out there. Simple emotes like waving, smiling, beckoning, surrenduring, kneeling, unconcious/dead, rude.  (my favorite) with a very simple way to trigger them. Not having to type out /emote wave_Trixie9819 

     

    Chat box tabs and colors. Let the players decide what color 'speech' is, what color 'emotions' or 'actions' are. Let there be a way to set up a chat tab with only what you are doing now, with a separate tab for guild, another for local, another for combat, etc. etc. Let them mix and match and change the colors. It's a LOT easier for the eye to track a color than a name. If I want to assign blue text to everything Johnny's saying, let me. Or at least let me assign it for my group, another color for my guild, another for combat, etc.

     

    Remember that RPers are very, very creative, if you give them the bare bones they will build on it. As they use what you've given them, you can develop more for them. Housing and decorating is very good for RPers. Being able to decorate 'public' buildings like a city hall or a bar. Cities themselves are good for Roleplayers and non-roleplayers alike.

     

    I hope I've given you something to think about, sorry for the long post, especially for my very first post over here, lol.

     

    Trixie

  • eyceleycel rolling hillz, PAPosts: 1,334Member

    The thought that comes to my mind right off the bat is what star trek online was claming to be before Crytic got ahold of it.  It looked really cool!  I think there was some good stuff there before it got handed over.  Also Stargate online was really looking like something special untill there company got caught in a scandal of some sorts and went bankrupt from court rulings.  I think there was some really good ideas in Stargate online as well, both games had good stuff to take from and add to the genre. 

    I would really like to see a non combat mmo, an adventure MMO to be honest.  Something that alot of people could play and be available to a broad audience more so then the current crop of MMO we have.  It wouldnt have to be non combat, but possibly adventure/combat mmo, maybee a mix of some sorts.   Possibly an mmo that works your brains more, on the level of something like portal but in the mmo setting, and of course compleaty different lol! 

    Or there is a ton of people loving the horror zombie scene, make a sandbox living breathing world overrun by maniac zombies.  You could code NPC characters to talk to you in real time using your own mic, changing there opinion of you how you talk to them and what you say, like if your in an intense run for your life from thousands of zombies, and there is some dude waiting at a door for you to let you in, if your acting silly with your voice cause your scared maybee he thinks your a zombie to, but if your calm and explain your self u survive and get to where its safe!

    image

  • rojoArcueidrojoArcueid hell, NJPosts: 6,765Member Uncommon

    Assassins Creed gameplay and movement mechanics in a fantasy RPG game. Anime art style preferred, but not a must.

    image
  • Loke666Loke666 MalmöPosts: 17,949Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by finny174

    Hi, Im creating a MMORPG game  using Unity3D and I would like to know what would you like to see in a RPG? Or what's something new that you would like to see? The more ideas the better. Thanks.

    There are a few things:

    1. Character customization. A RPG character should both look and be different than other players of the same class (if you have classes). Let there be plenty of coices, it is better to have few classes with many choices than the other way around.

    2. Choices. Let there be choices in the game and let them have some impact. Now I don't mean TOR type dialogue quests here. A good example is the quest series in EQ2 that lets you change from good to evil or the other way around. Also if you have quests let the players choose either what type of quests to do or have several ways for them to complete them. There should be quests you solved by being sneaky or smart instead of just killing stuff all the time.

    3. RPG tools. Stuff like emotions, formal clothing, personal houses and similar ways for players to express themselves by.

    4. Real day and night cykel. I mean one where certain or most stores close at night, farmers go home and sleep, monsters that are only active during night and so on. It adds to the feel that the world is alive.

    5. Weather that matters. Let the players actually freeze when it is cold, get wet when it rains and so on. Bathing in the winter should be dangerous.

    6. Food and drink. Players should need to eat and drink just like in old RPGs (like Eye of the beholder). It also adds to making the game feel more alive and provides work for crafter since good cooked food should last longer than apples and iron rations.

    7, Tools for guilds to create social events. Let guilds have tournaments, dances, archery competitions and similar. Let there also be mechanics to allow players to gamble at taverns (dices or knucklebones are easiest). It brings the community closer together. Allow betting in jousts and similar events.

  • FlipTheFrogFlipTheFrog ViennaPosts: 23Member

    A good story that's like a main plot of the game, with an epic quest series as in LotRO for example - I love to have a "journey" in an MMO, not only random quests.

    Little grinding for achievements - "kill 5000 wolves" is not really motivating, better be creative.

    Optional PvP  - I hate if you have to deal with aggressive co-gamers, but pure PvE games usually lack people to play with.

    Many fractions, at least three - I think that games with at least three sections are more exciting. Two always means one will be stronger than the other, three means the two weaker can gang up agains the third one, that's fun. Things can change than, aren't static.

    Which brings me to something I would SOOO love to see in an MMO: Non-static worlds, meaning that main bosses you kill should stay dead, the world should change with the story, etc. I know this requires a lot of instancing, but it makes the experience so fucking exciting. There could be something like flashback points through which you can kill the same guys over and over again or if you plan on helping others you are drawn into their instance. If you bring this into your game you got one sure player ;D

     

  • waynejr2waynejr2 West Toluca Lake, CAPosts: 4,472Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by anothername

    *grin* Oh, seriously?

    Just a virtual replacement for the weekend pen & paper RPG session.

    This.

     

    Also, a setting like WOG.

  • KiljaedenasKiljaedenas New Westminster, BCPosts: 468Member

    There is definitely a glut of fantasy MMOs and WoW clones, and if you're going sci-fi you'll be hard-pressed competing against Eve Online if you go that futuristic...The Secret World and World of Darkness are going to have more modern-day themed stuff...

    One thing I've noticed is that there definitely seems to be a lack of steampunk-ish MMOs, so you might want to try that. One particular genre that I've seen in a couple of TV shows and the Facebook-linked game Battlestations 2 is the one where Earth has broken up into a series of flying islands, and you need airships to get between them. If you could make a full 3D MMO based on that, personally I think that would be bloody cool, but that's my personal take on it.

    For general aspects that would make an MMO good and not fall into the standard WoW clone trap:

    -Avoid mindless grind as much as possible. "Kill 20 wolves", "Collect 15 spider cloths", etc, gets very boring very fast. You'll have to have at least some PvE content regardless of whether or not your MMO focuses on PvP, so make it really meaningful.

    -Avoid stupid inflation in the player-run market. There are so many MMOs that allowed players to make those little shops with them sitting on the floor and they could put whatever price they wanted onto the items, that inflation on the "average" prices of those items got so bad that only top level players could ever afford them and the lower level players were completely screwed over. The only effective counter I have ever found to this is a fully player-run economy and fully destructable equipment as is done in Eve Online. If everything a player has on them can get blown up, and often does, if they have to regularly find replacements they're not going to buy from someone with an inflated price. If everyone is inflated, they'll just mine the necessary resources and craft it themselves.

    -Avoid quick approach to endgame. Even if you get someone who doesn't eat, sleep or poop while playing the game, they shouldn't be able to burn through it in only 2 weeks. If you can make it so that a player like that would still take at least two years to get to the "end game" content, and would have to go through meaningful, engaging content that entire time, you're going to be worshipped as a god of developers.

    -Avoid WoW-style skill hotkeying and auto-attacking. This style is very old, very boring, and even the great Eve Online uses it. Try to incorporate full twitch mechanics in your combat.

    -Incorporate real world human skill. Don't have the outcome of a fight dictated purely by difference in level, and corresponding equipment/skills. For most MMOs, if a lower level player attacked a high level one the high level player could just sit there with his thumb up his ass while everything the low level player throws at him is "dodged" or just does 0 damage. Have human real-world skill involved in determining the outcome. Example, in Eve Online a player's real-world skill in logistical and tactical planning play a major part in fights. In an FPS like Counterstrike, a player's real world skill at aiming and dodging with the mouse/keyboard play a crucial factor in determining who wins a fight. A high level idiot should be able to be stomped into the dirt by a low level badass.

    -Avoid players going into self-contained bubbles. Most MMOs give every player the exact same PvE chain of quests. Every single player saves Mindy from the orc, kills the evil demon overlord Kraz with a band of adventurers in a dungeon, and supplies the starving village with sacks of grain. Mindy needs to die for being stupid enough to get caught that many times, Kraz is probably sick of having to resurrect so much and that village probably has enough food now to feed a country for a decade...and every player can do all of this either on their own or with a limited group of friends. Try to have UNIQUE PvE content that truly forces a large number of players (100+) to work together to overcome the content, and once the final enemy is beaten, that's it. That event ends, no one else can do it. Another event may spawn somewhere else in a few days, but that first one is completely done. This is similar to Eve Online's Incursion system, or Rift's Rift system, though please don't ram it down people's throats every couple of hours like Rift seems to.

    -Don't release something that's not ready! Please, please PLEASE for the love of god listen to this one! Make sure the damn thing works properly at least 90% before you unleash it on the masses! No matter what the content is, if it's riddled with bugs up down and sideways it's still a crappy game. Test the thing, to death, before a single customer sees it.

    Where's the any key?

  • FlipTheFrogFlipTheFrog ViennaPosts: 23Member

    Originally posted by Kiljaedenas

    There is definitely a glut of fantasy MMOs and WoW clones, and if you're going sci-fi you'll be hard-pressed competing against Eve Online if you go that futuristic...The Secret World and World of Darkness are going to have more modern-day themed stuff...

    One thing I've noticed is that there definitely seems to be a lack of steampunk-ish MMOs, so you might want to try that. One particular genre that I've seen in a couple of TV shows and the Facebook-linked game Battlestations 2 is the one where Earth has broken up into a series of flying islands, and you need airships to get between them. If you could make a full 3D MMO based on that, personally I think that would be bloody cool, but that's my personal take on it.

    For general aspects that would make an MMO good and not fall into the standard WoW clone trap:

    -Avoid mindless grind as much as possible. "Kill 20 wolves", "Collect 15 spider cloths", etc, gets very boring very fast. You'll have to have at least some PvE content regardless of whether or not your MMO focuses on PvP, so make it really meaningful.

    -Avoid stupid inflation in the player-run market. There are so many MMOs that allowed players to make those little shops with them sitting on the floor and they could put whatever price they wanted onto the items, that inflation on the "average" prices of those items got so bad that only top level players could ever afford them and the lower level players were completely screwed over. The only effective counter I have ever found to this is a fully player-run economy and fully destructable equipment as is done in Eve Online. If everything a player has on them can get blown up, and often does, if they have to regularly find replacements they're not going to buy from someone with an inflated price. If everyone is inflated, they'll just mine the necessary resources and craft it themselves.

    -Avoid quick approach to endgame. Even if you get someone who doesn't eat, sleep or poop while playing the game, they shouldn't be able to burn through it in only 2 weeks. If you can make it so that a player like that would still take at least two years to get to the "end game" content, and would have to go through meaningful, engaging content that entire time, you're going to be worshipped as a god of developers.

    -Avoid WoW-style skill hotkeying and auto-attacking. This style is very old, very boring, and even the great Eve Online uses it. Try to incorporate full twitch mechanics in your combat.

    -Incorporate real world human skill. Don't have the outcome of a fight dictated purely by difference in level, and corresponding equipment/skills. For most MMOs, if a lower level player attacked a high level one the high level player could just sit there with his thumb up his ass while everything the low level player throws at him is "dodged" or just does 0 damage. Have human real-world skill involved in determining the outcome. Example, in Eve Online a player's real-world skill in logistical and tactical planning play a major part in fights. In an FPS like Counterstrike, a player's real world skill at aiming and dodging with the mouse/keyboard play a crucial factor in determining who wins a fight. A high level idiot should be able to be stomped into the dirt by a low level badass.

    -Avoid players going into self-contained bubbles. Most MMOs give every player the exact same PvE chain of quests. Every single player saves Mindy from the orc, kills the evil demon overlord Kraz with a band of adventurers in a dungeon, and supplies the starving village with sacks of grain. Mindy needs to die for being stupid enough to get caught that many times, Kraz is probably sick of having to resurrect so much and that village probably has enough food now to feed a country for a decade...and every player can do all of this either on their own or with a limited group of friends. Try to have UNIQUE PvE content that truly forces a large number of players (100+) to work together to overcome the content, and once the final enemy is beaten, that's it. That event ends, no one else can do it. Another event may spawn somewhere else in a few days, but that first one is completely done. This is similar to Eve Online's Incursion system, or Rift's Rift system, though please don't ram it down people's throats every couple of hours like Rift seems to.

    -Don't release something that's not ready! Please, please PLEASE for the love of god listen to this one! Make sure the damn thing works properly at least 90% before you unleash it on the masses! No matter what the content is, if it's riddled with bugs up down and sideways it's still a crappy game. Test the thing, to death, before a single customer sees it.

    I basically agree with every single point of this.

    Especially the no grinding and the incorporation of player skill.

  • nicole1nicole1 Bensalem, PAPosts: 3Member

    I have not played a lot of  RPG's but I guess majority of these games have the most basic concept and the same blueprint, such as quests and player versus player though these have become an important factor in the popularity of an RPG game... Maybe you can make a game that has a twist in it? Quests are fine... you just have to create it into something remarkable. Personally, i would like to see the "real world" and "magical world" combined in a game.. if you know what I mean. And for me a game is more engaging if it stimulates the power of teamwork! :)

  • FrostWyrmFrostWyrm Tempe, AZPosts: 1,036Member

    Originally posted by Kiljaedenas

    There is definitely a glut of fantasy MMOs and WoW clones, and if you're going sci-fi you'll be hard-pressed competing against Eve Online if you go that futuristic...The Secret World and World of Darkness are going to have more modern-day themed stuff...

    One thing I've noticed is that there definitely seems to be a lack of steampunk-ish MMOs, so you might want to try that. One particular genre that I've seen in a couple of TV shows and the Facebook-linked game Battlestations 2 is the one where Earth has broken up into a series of flying islands, and you need airships to get between them. If you could make a full 3D MMO based on that, personally I think that would be bloody cool, but that's my personal take on it.

    A steampunk MMO might be interesting. The big problem, as I see it, with Sci-Fi is that melee combat makes no sense and would have to be forced because everyone has guns. There's also the need to explain everything. "Its magic!" is a much easier fall-back for why things are possible than technology, which is based in logic.

  • BartDaCatBartDaCat Renton, WAPosts: 819Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by Kiljaedenas

    One thing I've noticed is that there definitely seems to be a lack of steampunk-ish MMOs, so you might want to try that. One particular genre that I've seen in a couple of TV shows and the Facebook-linked game Battlestations 2 is the one where Earth has broken up into a series of flying islands, and you need airships to get between them. If you could make a full 3D MMO based on that, personally I think that would be bloody cool, but that's my personal take on it.

    That reminds me of an incredible game that came out for the SEGA Dreamcast, called "Skies of Arcadia".  Google it, and take a look at some of the screenshots (the look was a little Japanimation, but it was still great).  That game was amazing.

  • gomiller43gomiller43 Altmar, NYPosts: 23Member

    I want to see a game that's stripped down to the basics so Role Playing is actually possible. I'm a pretty serious role player, and even I get lost in trying to get my stats to be higher than everyone elses. So what you gotta do is create a world that is elegantly simple to shape by the will of the players, and make Role Playing the best way to advance in the game.

    Step I: Create your shell game world. This includes all the things that players need to make characters, all the monsters you want in your game, all the skills and stats you want to work with (make sure that you don't put too much focus on that one), make your game world and set up your cities and your powers that be, like lords and city guards and everything. Write a library of lore for your world to give it depth, from how the world was created, to all the different religious groups and cults, to the legends and myths of the races, to history of all the different empires that exist, to what kinds of plants you can find in the world, to the things you can make out of the resources in the world... EVERYTHING!

    Step II: Beta test and work out the mistakes. Make sure you get some good feedback to fix all the mistakes and add things that would make the game better. In choosing your testers, put some emphasis on the fact that you intend to focus the game on role playing but balance that with regular MMORPG gameplay to attract other crowds.

    Step III: Take your beta testers and find friendly players who have experience in roleplaying and have time to dick off on your game. Appoint them as your personal army of Game Masters/Dungeon Masters. Have them all develop storylines for a specific region of your world map and give them everything they need to make the stories come to life; the power to spawn monsters, control the actions of the Bot's around the cities, the ability to plant traps and obstacles for the player characters to overcome in the quests. Also give them the power to control the tactics and triggers for their NPC's and Monsters. For example, allow them to set a bunch of Highwaymen Mobs to hide in the trees by a road until some one passes by and then ambush them and demand money. If the highwaymen get their way or kill the player, they stay there. If they all die, then that encounter cannot be triggered again unless the local GM tells the system to reset the encounter. The GM would be able to control how the highwaymen fight as well. Will they strike from afar or fight melee, and under what conditions? Will they try to flank or attack head on? Will they use the trees for cover or not? If they find out they're losing, will they flee?

    Step IV: Keep your GM's on the same page. Meet with them for a video chat or something every now and then, and encourage them to follow the same system of development in their quests- I'd go with making sure that players know how to make the right decisions and to make sure they know that they can't get away with the same rash behavior of theirs from other MMO's. For instance, if a player walks into the ambush with the highwaymen and they're outnumbered with no way to possibly take them all, he'd do well to just give them their money and make it out alive. I'd also say that in the newbie region, there should be something to save your ass when you screw up, like a bunch of elf scouts taking out your highwaymen if you get too close to death, who will take you back to their camp and heal you and tell you not to screw up again. Or, if you're an enemy of the elves, they might hold you captive and you might have to come up with an escape plan.

    The GM's would have to make sure that each encounter had a potential for success though. People get pissed off when they're hopeless. Permanent Death is the way to go when you're not in the newbie area. People will take their characters more seriously. Plus, a low level cap (20?) would be great too. People would max out their characters and then have to go exploring the game world for new powers instead of leveling.

  • GorweGorwe ZagrebPosts: 2,472Member Uncommon
    Just one thing:

    Warhammer Fantasy RP Video-Game done right. I'd kill to see Ulthuan in all the glory of Skyrim's engine(I guess that Oblivion's engine could work too). And I MEAN THAT!!!
  • aesperusaesperus Hamshire, NVPosts: 5,128Member Uncommon

    Originally posted by finny174

    Hi, Im creating a MMORPG game  using Unity3D and I would like to know what would you like to see in a RPG? Or what's something new that you would like to see? The more ideas the better. Thanks.

    Finny174

    Wow, that isn't a short list. A decent, engaging story for one (there's really only a couple MMOs I feel really do that right).

    - Different combat mechanics. The old D&D, aggro table is just too stale nowadays. Plus I know there are more interesting ways to handle combat, just few studios willing to try them.

    - Improved character customization. Looks are nice, but I would take more options in how you setup how your character plays over looks any day. I'd also like to see a balanced system in which players can create their own skills. (not unlike some of the old skyrim games, but I feel it can be done better). Also, no pre-defined classes would be awesome

    - Better crafting. Most games, again, fail to make crafting all that meaningful.

    - Voice overs. I feel this is almost necessary with the new generation of MMOs. It's just too hard to go back from that.

    - Interesting bosses & boss fights. Sick of tank & spank. Either more bosses with environmental factors, or more interesting fights, period.

    ** Probably the most important thing, though is just a solid base of an MMO for which you can expand upon in a lot of different ways. Sadly, most games fail to do even this.

  • robinklerobinkle TønsbergPosts: 3Member

    I would like an RPG with extreme sandbox features.

    You create race, choose type of land. Race would need to fit the climate of the land. 

    Once the game starts, it's you and the empty land where you need to build, craft and  hunt to survive.

    When you build, NPCs will show up trying to do the same as you. At the end after many hours of gameplay, you will have allies, enemies and dusins of kingdoms around you. So the game sort of build it self through smart scripting. As things happen history will write it self, and quests and new npc's will be dynamically generated.

    In an online perspective others make their races and lands, and will be connected together and make the even world bigger.

    Game need to include, dungeons and reasons to build them, same with faith/religion, economy currency policies across kingdoms/lands/people. politics between kingdoms/lands/people.

     

    edit: important, needs to be in medieval/fantasy setting.

     

    I guess you get the point. :) It's more like having the players complete the game. And every server/game would be very different from another.

  • WizardryWizardry Ontario, CanadaPosts: 8,432Member Uncommon

    First thing that EVERY game should have is an ECO system.Resources should be seasonal as well,not re-spawns every 30 seconds after harvested.Mobs should only drop what they are using/carrying.EVERYTHING should be discovered from scratch,no npc's selling stuff out of thin air .Bosses should NOT be stagnant predictable spawns,they should appear anywhere,anytime.

    I could go on and on but most devs don't like to put in the effort i want to see.


    Samoan Diamond

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