PSU Question

rr2realrr2real San Luis Obispo, CAMember Posts: 448

I'm replacing my mobo, CPU and RAM in my computer and i wanted to know if my 535 watt psu

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817103512

will work with this combo

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.216527

 

i'll be using my HD4850 with those parts as well

Comments

  • DemonshankDemonshank Central, ILMember Posts: 91
    Originally posted by rr2real


    I'm replacing my mobo, CPU and RAM in my computer and i wanted to know if my 535 watt psu
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817103512
    will work with this combo
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.216527
     
    i'll be using my HD4850 with those parts as well



     

    Not knowing which hd4850 you have makes it harder to tell. That psu has a dual rail setup, each rail providing 12v@18amps.

    Not sure that is enough, depending on what hd4850 you have. I would recommend an alternative, probably www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx 12v@25amps dual rail 600w.

    or www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx 12v@22amps x2 12v@25amps x1, triple rail 650w.

    As per this below, I like this psu, good deal, free 4 port usb, $90 bucks after rebate and I like OCZ, been using one for 2.5yrs now continuously w/0 problems. www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx 12v@56amps single rail 700w

    If you are a overclocker, 535w is pretty low from my experience, but im not a pro and I spent about 15mins looking around to give you a decent amount of info. I personally would go for a 650w+ for a quad. GL rr2real

    Read here forums.pcper.com/showthread.php

    With all the hype about multiple 12-volt rails (ads claim that two rails is better than one, five is better than four, etc.), you’d think it was a better design. Unfortunately, it’s not!

    Here are the facts: A large, single 12-volt rail (without a 240VA limit) can transfer 100% of the 12-volt output from the PSU to the computer, while a multi-rail 12-volt design has distribution losses of up to 30% of the power supply’s rating. Those losses occur because power literally gets “trapped” on under-utilized rails. For example, if the 12-volt rail that powers the CPU is rated for 17 amps and the CPU only uses 7A, the remaining 10A is unusable, since it is isolated from the rest of the system.

    Since the maximum current from any one 12-volt rail of a multiple-rail PSU is limited to 20 amps (240VA / 12 volts = 20 amps), PCs with high-performance components that draw over 20 amps from the same rail are subject to over-current shutdowns. With power requirements for multiple processors and graphics cards continuing to grow, the multiple-rail design, with its 240VA limit per rail, is basically obsolete.

    PC Power and Cooling is once again leading the industry. All of our power supplies now feature a large, single 12-volt rail. The design is favored by major processor and graphics companies, complies with EPS12V specs (the 240VA limit is not a requirement) and is approved by all major safety agencies such as UL and TUV.

  • rr2realrr2real San Luis Obispo, CAMember Posts: 448
    Originally posted by Demonshank

    Originally posted by rr2real


    I'm replacing my mobo, CPU and RAM in my computer and i wanted to know if my 535 watt psu
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817103512
    will work with this combo
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.216527
     
    i'll be using my HD4850 with those parts as well



     

    Not knowing which hd4850 you have makes it harder to tell. That psu has a dual rail setup, each rail providing 12v@18amps.

    Not sure that is enough, depending on what hd4850 you have. I would recommend an alternative, probably www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx 12v@25amps dual rail 600w.

    or www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx 12v@22amps x2 12v@25amps x1, triple rail 650w.

    As per this below, I like this psu, good deal, free 4 port usb, $90 bucks after rebate and I like OCZ, been using one for 2.5yrs now continuously w/0 problems. www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx 12v@56amps single rail 700w

    If you are a overclocker, 535w is pretty low from my experience, but im not a pro and I spent about 15mins looking around to give you a decent amount of info. I personally would go for a 650w+ for a quad. GL rr2real

    Read here forums.pcper.com/showthread.php

    With all the hype about multiple 12-volt rails (ads claim that two rails is better than one, five is better than four, etc.), you’d think it was a better design. Unfortunately, it’s not!

    Here are the facts: A large, single 12-volt rail (without a 240VA limit) can transfer 100% of the 12-volt output from the PSU to the computer, while a multi-rail 12-volt design has distribution losses of up to 30% of the power supply’s rating. Those losses occur because power literally gets “trapped” on under-utilized rails. For example, if the 12-volt rail that powers the CPU is rated for 17 amps and the CPU only uses 7A, the remaining 10A is unusable, since it is isolated from the rest of the system.

    Since the maximum current from any one 12-volt rail of a multiple-rail PSU is limited to 20 amps (240VA / 12 volts = 20 amps), PCs with high-performance components that draw over 20 amps from the same rail are subject to over-current shutdowns. With power requirements for multiple processors and graphics cards continuing to grow, the multiple-rail design, with its 240VA limit per rail, is basically obsolete.

    PC Power and Cooling is once again leading the industry. All of our power supplies now feature a large, single 12-volt rail. The design is favored by major processor and graphics companies, complies with EPS12V specs (the 240VA limit is not a requirement) and is approved by all major safety agencies such as UL and TUV.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102770&nm_mc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel&cm_mmc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel-_-Content-_-text-_-N82E16814102770 

    that's the video card i have

    how do you know i don't have enough power?

     

  • DemonshankDemonshank Central, ILMember Posts: 91
    Originally posted by rr2real


    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102770&nm_mc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel&cm_mmc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel-_-Content-_-text-_-N82E16814102770 
    that's the video card i have
    how do you know i don't have enough power?
     



     

    I did say im not certain, but now that I know your vid card and power needs

    This is in the system reqs. on the vid card. You have 535w

    450 Watt or greater power supply with 75 Watt 6-pin PCI Express power connector recommended 

    +

    130W Quad-Core Processor

    I can totally see that working, it just seems a little short, honestly. Bumping to a 600w would probably get you by too, but id want some security and flexibility, so 650w+ would be my choice. I dont build everyday so im sure others would have some input. Id say take some other opinions. I would not run that system with that psu. Id rather have too much than too little. Quads like their power. Good luck though rr2real, hope it works out for ya.

  • rr2realrr2real San Luis Obispo, CAMember Posts: 448
    Originally posted by Demonshank

    Originally posted by rr2real


    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102770&nm_mc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel&cm_mmc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel-_-Content-_-text-_-N82E16814102770 
    that's the video card i have
    how do you know i don't have enough power?
     



     

    I did say im not certain, but now that I know your vid card and power needs

    This is in the system reqs. on the vid card. You have 535w

    450 Watt or greater power supply with 75 Watt 6-pin PCI Express power connector recommended 

    +

    130W Quad-Core Processor

    I can totally see that working, it just seems a little short, honestly. Bumping to a 600w would probably get you by too, but id want some security and flexibility, so 650w+ would be my choice. I dont build everyday so im sure others would have some input. Id say take some other opinions. I would not run that system with that psu. Id rather have too much than too little. Quads like their power. Good luck though rr2real, hope it works out for ya.

    ok what's the worst that could happen if my system was underpowered?

  • DemonshankDemonshank Central, ILMember Posts: 91
    Originally posted by rr2real

    Originally posted by Demonshank

    Originally posted by rr2real


    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102770&nm_mc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel&cm_mmc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel-_-Content-_-text-_-N82E16814102770 
    that's the video card i have
    how do you know i don't have enough power?
     



     

    I did say im not certain, but now that I know your vid card and power needs

    This is in the system reqs. on the vid card. You have 535w

    450 Watt or greater power supply with 75 Watt 6-pin PCI Express power connector recommended 

    +

    130W Quad-Core Processor

    I can totally see that working, it just seems a little short, honestly. Bumping to a 600w would probably get you by too, but id want some security and flexibility, so 650w+ would be my choice. I dont build everyday so im sure others would have some input. Id say take some other opinions. I would not run that system with that psu. Id rather have too much than too little. Quads like their power. Good luck though rr2real, hope it works out for ya.

    ok what's the worst that could happen if my system was underpowered?



     

    What are the symptoms of having an underpowered PC?

    Random reboots, probably a hot running PSU (not always the case, though).

    It can become unstable and destroy some components.

     

    Or it can blow, destroying itself and some other components.

     

     

  • noquarternoquarter Vancouver, WAMember Posts: 1,170

    Well, if the 4850 specifically says it needs 75w on the PCI-e power connector that's only 6.25 amps so you should have no prob. The card can get about 75w just through the actual PCI-e slot if it needs to, on top of whatever it pulls off the 12v rail and a 4850 only uses like 110w total. (a 4770 is technically able to run off of just the PCIe slot but has a power connector for overclocking).


    image

    If you take a look at the '6 pin' column, where it shows '12v ex.1' that's how much power it's drawing off the 6 pin power connector.. shows just around 75w there so yea.. you should be fine!


    edit: you may find more useful information reading page 6-9 from this link:
    http://xbitlabs.com/articles/coolers/display/system-wattage_6.html

  • rr2realrr2real San Luis Obispo, CAMember Posts: 448
    Originally posted by noquarter


    Well, if the 4850 specifically says it needs 75w on the PCI-e power connector that's only 6.25 amps so you should have no prob. The card can get about 75w just through the actual PCI-e slot if it needs to, on top of whatever it pulls off the 12v rail and a 4850 only uses like 110w total. (a 4770 is technically able to run off of just the PCIe slot but has a power connector for overclocking).



    If you take a look at the '6 pin' column, where it shows '12v ex.1' that's how much power it's drawing off the 6 pin power connector.. shows just around 75w there so yea.. you should be fine!


    edit: you may find more useful information reading page 6-9 from this link:

    http://xbitlabs.com/articles/coolers/display/system-wattage_6.html

     

    so i should be fine then because the most power that should be used by my CPU and video card would be about 240 watts? then add about 100 more for USB and fans so it comes to about 340 ish? which is well under my 535 watt then right?

  • noquarternoquarter Vancouver, WAMember Posts: 1,170

    Yep you're right on.. you'll have almost exactly the same system as the high-end PC 1 in that review (371W) except a 4850 (110W) instead of a GTX 260 (130W) so you should be right around 350W which is a perfect fit for a 535W PSU since 50%-75% load is the most efficient range on a PSU.


    The Enermax Whisper is a good quality PSU too so I don't see any problems.

  • rr2realrr2real San Luis Obispo, CAMember Posts: 448
    Originally posted by noquarter


    Yep you're right on.. you'll have almost exactly the same system as the high-end PC 1 in that review (371W) except a 4850 (110W) instead of a GTX 260 (130W) so you should be right around 350W which is a perfect fit for a 535W PSU since 50%-75% load is the most efficient range on a PSU.


    The Enermax Whisper is a good quality PSU too so I don't see any problems.

     

    ah ok good :D

    also  my psu is about 3 years old

    should that factor in at all?

  • noquarternoquarter Vancouver, WAMember Posts: 1,170


    Originally posted by rr2real
    Originally posted by noquarter Yep you're right on.. you'll have almost exactly the same system as the high-end PC 1 in that review (371W) except a 4850 (110W) instead of a GTX 260 (130W) so you should be right around 350W which is a perfect fit for a 535W PSU since 50%-75% load is the most efficient range on a PSU.The Enermax Whisper is a good quality PSU too so I don't see any problems.
     
    ah ok good :D
    also  my psu is about 3 years old
    should that factor in at all?


    It does, the capacitors in a PSU dry out over the years and it reduces the max wattage it can produce. There's no simple way to determine how much aging has effected a PSU because it depends on how much it's been used and at what temperatures, and the quality of the parts constructed with.


    So a quality brand with decent overhead of wattage will help against this problem because of lower temperature it will be running at if you don't have it at max load.


    3 years isn't that old though I don't think it should be a problem. Also a lot of brands carry lifetime warranties, Enermax only has a 3 year warranty though.. but that's one thing to consider when buying a PSU.

  • rr2realrr2real San Luis Obispo, CAMember Posts: 448
    Originally posted by noquarter


     

    Originally posted by rr2real


    Originally posted by noquarter
     
    Yep you're right on.. you'll have almost exactly the same system as the high-end PC 1 in that review (371W) except a 4850 (110W) instead of a GTX 260 (130W) so you should be right around 350W which is a perfect fit for a 535W PSU since 50%-75% load is the most efficient range on a PSU.
    The Enermax Whisper is a good quality PSU too so I don't see any problems.

     

    ah ok good :D

    also  my psu is about 3 years old

    should that factor in at all?

     



    It does, the capacitors in a PSU dry out over the years and it reduces the max wattage it can produce. There's no simple way to determine how much aging has effected a PSU because it depends on how much it's been used and at what temperatures, and the quality of the parts constructed with.



    So a quality brand with decent overhead of wattage will help against this problem because of lower temperature it will be running at if you don't have it at max load.



    3 years isn't that old though I don't think it should be a problem. Also a lot of brands carry lifetime warranties, Enermax only has a 3 year warranty though.. but that's one thing to consider when buying a PSU.

     

    haha ok i see

    i just wanted to be sure

    i'd have to have my new i7 system get shorted out cause of my PSU being "old"

  • noquarternoquarter Vancouver, WAMember Posts: 1,170


    Originally posted by rr2realhaha ok i see
    i just wanted to be sure
    i'd have to have my new i7 system get shorted out cause of my PSU being "old"


    Ya I know what you mean, I seriously don't see that happening though. If the PSU is overloaded what you should see is system instability + the PSU running really hot then shutting down due to heat. Just feel the air blowing out of the PSU with a game running and if the fan is max with really hot air blowing out then you're probably pushing it too much.


    I had a PSU that was dying on me have the fan go out and my PSU was scorching hot to the touch and it still lasted a week of being on 24/7 before it finally gave out lol.. then they warrantied it and upgraded me to their top model :)

  • rr2realrr2real San Luis Obispo, CAMember Posts: 448
    Originally posted by noquarter


     

    Originally posted by rr2real
     
    haha ok i see

    i just wanted to be sure

    i'd have to have my new i7 system get shorted out cause of my PSU being "old"

     



    Ya I know what you mean, I seriously don't see that happening though. If the PSU is overloaded what you should see is system instability + the PSU running really hot then shutting down due to heat. Just feel the air blowing out of the PSU with a game running and if the fan is max with really hot air blowing out then you're probably pushing it too much.



    I had a PSU that was dying on me have the fan go out and my PSU was scorching hot to the touch and it still lasted a week of being on 24/7 before it finally gave out lol.. then they warrantied it and upgraded me to their top model :)

    haha worked out pretty well for you :)

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